OK: Found an XML parser.
OK: Support for GZIP encoding.
OK: Support for character munging.

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Example Output

Channel: First Media Marketing

RSS URL:

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      ["title"]=>
      string(67) "Survivors of trauma struggle to move on from the loss of loved ones"
      ["link"]=>
      string(100) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/survivors-of-trauma-struggle-to-move-on-from-the-loss-of-loved-ones/"
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      string(714) "Journal Reference: Kristin A. Glad, Synne Stensland, Nikolai O. Czajkowski, Paul A. Boelen and Grete Dyb. The Longitudinal Association Between Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress and Complicated Grief. A Random Intercepts Cross-Lag Analysis. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy, 2021 DOI: 10.1037/tra0001087 “Grief is a normal response to the loss of someone close, but traumatic ... Read more"
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Journal Reference:

  1. Kristin A. Glad, Synne Stensland, Nikolai O. Czajkowski, Paul A. Boelen and Grete Dyb. The Longitudinal Association Between Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress and Complicated Grief. A Random Intercepts Cross-Lag Analysis. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy, 2021 DOI: 10.1037/tra0001087

“Grief is a normal response to the loss of someone close, but traumatic losses may severely harm survivors for years,” said Kristin Alve Glad, PhD, a researcher at the Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies and lead author of the study. “Our findings suggest that when treating trauma survivors, targeting symptoms of PTSD early might help them avoid complicated grief later on.”

For most people who experience grief, feelings of distress and bereavement tend to diminish over time, according to Glad. In the case of complicated grief, instead of fading, symptoms can often linger or worsen and can impair or prevent people from living their normal lives.

“Complicated grief has been defined as a persistent, intense yearning, longing and sadness, usually accompanied by insistent thoughts or images of the deceased and a sense of disbelief or an inability to accept the painful reality of the person’s death,” said Glad.

In the study, published in the journal Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy, researchers interviewed survivors of a 2011 domestic terrorist attack on Utøya, an island in Norway, who lost someone close to them in the attack. Of the 275 participants, 256 lost a close friend, six lost a family member and 13 lost a close friend and a family member/partner.

Participants took part in individual, face-to-face interviews with experienced health care personnel three times following the attack on Utøya: 4-5 months, 14-15 months and 30-32 months after the attack. The interviews included questions about the post-traumatic stress symptoms and complicated grief reactions (e.g., trouble accepting the death of their loved one, interference of grief in their daily life, troubling thoughts relating to death, avoidance of reminders of the loss and feelings of isolation or distance from others).

Researchers found that participants who reported symptoms of PTSD were significantly more likely to report symptoms of complicated grief as well. They also found that participants who experienced early symptoms of PTSD a year after the attack experienced even greater symptoms of complicated grief years later.

“The fact that we found that PTSD symptoms predicted complicated grief reactions at a subsequent time point, but complicated grief did not predict the development of PTSD, is interesting, because it suggests that targeting PTSD symptoms may hinder later development of complicated grief,” said Glad. “This may have important implications for clinicians working with bereaved trauma survivors.”

The researchers believe that the effects of the terrorist attack on the survivors were particularly severe because they did not just lose a loved one — they were directly exposed to the attack as well. This dual burden of the unexpected loss and the survivors’ high exposure to trauma may result in a different trajectory of PTSD symptoms and complicated grief than for bereaved who are not directly exposed to the trauma.

These findings could apply to anyone who has lost a loved one in a potentially traumatizing way, according to Glad. Knowledge about the relationship between symptoms of PTSD and complicated grief over time may help clinicians develop more effective treatment strategies and formulate better treatment plans for the survivors who struggle the most to cope, the researchers said.

We wish to give thanks to the writer of this short article for this awesome material

Survivors of trauma struggle to move on from the loss of loved ones

" } ["summary"]=> string(714) "Journal Reference: Kristin A. Glad, Synne Stensland, Nikolai O. Czajkowski, Paul A. Boelen and Grete Dyb. The Longitudinal Association Between Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress and Complicated Grief. A Random Intercepts Cross-Lag Analysis. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy, 2021 DOI: 10.1037/tra0001087 “Grief is a normal response to the loss of someone close, but traumatic ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4511) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Kristin A. Glad, Synne Stensland, Nikolai O. Czajkowski, Paul A. Boelen and Grete Dyb. The Longitudinal Association Between Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress and Complicated Grief. A Random Intercepts Cross-Lag Analysis. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy, 2021 DOI: 10.1037/tra0001087

“Grief is a normal response to the loss of someone close, but traumatic losses may severely harm survivors for years,” said Kristin Alve Glad, PhD, a researcher at the Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies and lead author of the study. “Our findings suggest that when treating trauma survivors, targeting symptoms of PTSD early might help them avoid complicated grief later on.”

For most people who experience grief, feelings of distress and bereavement tend to diminish over time, according to Glad. In the case of complicated grief, instead of fading, symptoms can often linger or worsen and can impair or prevent people from living their normal lives.

“Complicated grief has been defined as a persistent, intense yearning, longing and sadness, usually accompanied by insistent thoughts or images of the deceased and a sense of disbelief or an inability to accept the painful reality of the person’s death,” said Glad.

In the study, published in the journal Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy, researchers interviewed survivors of a 2011 domestic terrorist attack on Utøya, an island in Norway, who lost someone close to them in the attack. Of the 275 participants, 256 lost a close friend, six lost a family member and 13 lost a close friend and a family member/partner.

Participants took part in individual, face-to-face interviews with experienced health care personnel three times following the attack on Utøya: 4-5 months, 14-15 months and 30-32 months after the attack. The interviews included questions about the post-traumatic stress symptoms and complicated grief reactions (e.g., trouble accepting the death of their loved one, interference of grief in their daily life, troubling thoughts relating to death, avoidance of reminders of the loss and feelings of isolation or distance from others).

Researchers found that participants who reported symptoms of PTSD were significantly more likely to report symptoms of complicated grief as well. They also found that participants who experienced early symptoms of PTSD a year after the attack experienced even greater symptoms of complicated grief years later.

“The fact that we found that PTSD symptoms predicted complicated grief reactions at a subsequent time point, but complicated grief did not predict the development of PTSD, is interesting, because it suggests that targeting PTSD symptoms may hinder later development of complicated grief,” said Glad. “This may have important implications for clinicians working with bereaved trauma survivors.”

The researchers believe that the effects of the terrorist attack on the survivors were particularly severe because they did not just lose a loved one — they were directly exposed to the attack as well. This dual burden of the unexpected loss and the survivors’ high exposure to trauma may result in a different trajectory of PTSD symptoms and complicated grief than for bereaved who are not directly exposed to the trauma.

These findings could apply to anyone who has lost a loved one in a potentially traumatizing way, according to Glad. Knowledge about the relationship between symptoms of PTSD and complicated grief over time may help clinicians develop more effective treatment strategies and formulate better treatment plans for the survivors who struggle the most to cope, the researchers said.

We wish to give thanks to the writer of this short article for this awesome material

Survivors of trauma struggle to move on from the loss of loved ones

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1643305255) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(74) "Eurimages to support 30 films, including Margarethe von Trotta Bergman doc" ["link"]=> string(106) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/eurimages-to-support-30-films-including-margarethe-von-trotta-bergman-doc/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Sally Scully" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 27 Jan 2022 17:23:22 +0000" ["category"]=> string(85) "Movie Production CompaniesBergmanDocEurimagesFilmsincludingMargarethesupportTrottavon" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=10199" ["description"]=> string(666) "Eurimages have announced co-production funding for a number of new projects, at a total of over €5.5m. The Board of Management of the Council of Europe’s Eurimages Fund agreed to fund 22 fiction, seven documentaries and one animation. The biggest grants from the total €5,598,535 were given to France’s Girls of The Sun by Eva ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(9542) "

Eurimages have announced co-production funding for a number of new projects, at a total of over €5.5m.

The Board of Management of the Council of Europe’s Eurimages Fund agreed to fund 22 fiction, seven documentaries and one animation.

The biggest grants from the total €5,598,535 were given to France’s Girls of The Sun by Eva Husson (€500,000), Irish project Sweetness In The Belly by Zeresenay Mehari (€480,000) and Keep Going by Joachim Lafosse from Belgium (€460,000).

Also receiving funding are The Extraordinary Voyage Of Marona from Romania’s Anca Damian (€432,000) and The Hummingbird Project from Canada’s Kim Nguyen (€360,000).

35% of directors given grants were female (€1,990,768), after 32% of the projects analysed by the Board were female-helmed.

Some notable directors included in the selections include Germany’s Margarethe von Trotta (for her Bergman doc Ingmar Bergman – Legacy Of A Defining Genius) and Russia’s Yuri Bykov (The Factory).

The Board have also agreed to provide marketing and publicity costs for its Distribution Support Programme, supporting 33 requests for payment submitted by 16 distributors at a total of €309,832.

The full list of grants is as follows:

Distribution suppprt programme

SWITZERLAND

Trigon-Film:

Frenetic Films:

Filmcoopi Zurich:

Xenix Filmdistribution:

Now Films:

Impuls Pictures:

Cinerworx:

RUSSIAN FEDERATION:

Luxor Distribution:

Exponenta Plus:

Volgafilm:

Capella Film:

Cinema Prestige :

TURKEY

Mars Production:

Movies:

Fabula Media:

A New Movie:

We would love to thank the writer of this write-up for this remarkable web content

Eurimages to support 30 films, including Margarethe von Trotta Bergman doc

" } ["summary"]=> string(666) "Eurimages have announced co-production funding for a number of new projects, at a total of over €5.5m. The Board of Management of the Council of Europe’s Eurimages Fund agreed to fund 22 fiction, seven documentaries and one animation. The biggest grants from the total €5,598,535 were given to France’s Girls of The Sun by Eva ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(9542) "

Eurimages have announced co-production funding for a number of new projects, at a total of over €5.5m.

The Board of Management of the Council of Europe’s Eurimages Fund agreed to fund 22 fiction, seven documentaries and one animation.

The biggest grants from the total €5,598,535 were given to France’s Girls of The Sun by Eva Husson (€500,000), Irish project Sweetness In The Belly by Zeresenay Mehari (€480,000) and Keep Going by Joachim Lafosse from Belgium (€460,000).

Also receiving funding are The Extraordinary Voyage Of Marona from Romania’s Anca Damian (€432,000) and The Hummingbird Project from Canada’s Kim Nguyen (€360,000).

35% of directors given grants were female (€1,990,768), after 32% of the projects analysed by the Board were female-helmed.

Some notable directors included in the selections include Germany’s Margarethe von Trotta (for her Bergman doc Ingmar Bergman – Legacy Of A Defining Genius) and Russia’s Yuri Bykov (The Factory).

The Board have also agreed to provide marketing and publicity costs for its Distribution Support Programme, supporting 33 requests for payment submitted by 16 distributors at a total of €309,832.

The full list of grants is as follows:

Distribution suppprt programme

SWITZERLAND

Trigon-Film:

Frenetic Films:

Filmcoopi Zurich:

Xenix Filmdistribution:

Now Films:

Impuls Pictures:

Cinerworx:

RUSSIAN FEDERATION:

Luxor Distribution:

Exponenta Plus:

Volgafilm:

Capella Film:

Cinema Prestige :

TURKEY

Mars Production:

Movies:

Fabula Media:

A New Movie:

We would love to thank the writer of this write-up for this remarkable web content

Eurimages to support 30 films, including Margarethe von Trotta Bergman doc

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1643304202) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(128) "Covid-19 : sous la pression de l’opinion publique, le Québec assouplit les sévères restrictions imposées à la population" ["link"]=> string(149) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/covid-19-sous-la-pression-de-lopinion-publique-le-quebec-assouplit-les-severes-restrictions-imposees-a-la-population/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Paula Hooper" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 27 Jan 2022 17:14:39 +0000" ["category"]=> string(104) "World NewsassouplitCovid19imposéesleslopinionpopulationpressionpubliqueQuébecrestrictionssévèressous" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=10193" ["description"]=> string(818) "Un magasin fermé, dans un centre commercial de Montréal, le 2 janvier 2022. GRAHAM HUGHES / AP Depuis que la cinquième vague de Covid a frappé de plein fouet le Québec, avec près de 6 000 nouveaux cas quotidiens déclarés à la mi-janvier, mais surtout un pic de 3 425 hospitalisations dans une province de moins 8,5 millions ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5508) "

Depuis que la cinquième vague de Covid a frappé de plein fouet le Québec, avec près de 6 000 nouveaux cas quotidiens déclarés à la mi-janvier, mais surtout un pic de 3 425 hospitalisations dans une province de moins 8,5 millions d’habitants, le premier ministre François Legault (Coalition Avenir Québec, centre droit nationaliste) croyait pouvoir tenir droit dans ses bottes : « On ne peut pas se permettre d’assouplir davantage » répétait-il encore le 20 janvier.

Il avait annoncé dans l’urgence, la veille du jour de l’an, un nouveau tour de vis, avec interdiction des rassemblements privés hors bulle familiale, fermeture immédiate des bars et restaurants et même retour du couvre-feu, un dispositif unique sur tout le territoire nord-américain. Des restrictions sévères qui ne faisaient que confirmer la place de champion mondial qu’occupe le Québec, avec plus de 400 jours de confinement imposés à sa population depuis le déclenchement de la pandémie.

Lire aussi Article réservé à nos abonnés « Enfin, les Français vont revenir » : Montréal compte beaucoup sur le retour des touristes

Mais mardi 25 janvier a eu lieu un revirement total, malgré une situation épidémiologique inchangée : le chef du gouvernement a dévoilé les premières étapes d’un lent déconfinement à partir de la fin du mois, avec réouverture des restaurants puis des salles de spectacle à la clé.

Incohérence des mesures gouvernementales

« Nous n’étions pas la Chine qui reconfine des millions d’habitants pour quelques cas de Covid, mais nous n’en étions pas si loin », commente en plaisantant Benoît Barbeau, spécialiste en virologie à l’Université du Québec à Montréal. Selon lui « la fragilité du système de soins québécois, en manque de lits et de personnels depuis des décennies, ajoutée au traumatisme de l’hécatombe survenue dans les résidences de personnes âgées lors de la première vague [4 000 décès au printemps 2020] » explique que le gouvernement de François Legault ait été tétanisé à l’idée d’assouplir sa politique.

Pour autant ajoute-t-il, « la question de l’acceptabilité sociale d’une telle politique a fini par se poser. Il est difficile de continuer à imposer des sacrifices sans fin à une population, qui a par ailleurs pleinement joué le jeu de la vaccination [82,6 % de la population éligible a reçu deux doses de vaccin] ».

Lire le décryptage : Article réservé à nos abonnés Au Québec, la pandémie révélatrice d’un système de santé exsangue

Pour la première fois depuis le début de l’épidémie, la réticence des Québécois à observer les consignes sanitaires a en effet débordé du petit cercle des antivax. Une pâtissière de la région du Saguenay, située au nord de la province, est devenue le visage de la désobéissance civile. Cette Française installée au Québec depuis 1999 a bravé l’interdit en rouvrant son salon de thé à sa clientèle en début d’année. Malgré l’intervention de la police et le constat d’infraction dressé — qui lui vaudra une amende quotidienne comprise entre 1 000 et 6 000 dollars, soit entre 700 et 4 230 euros —, elle n’en démordait pas : il en allait désormais de la survie de son commerce et de la santé mentale de tous.

Il vous reste 43.5% de cet article à lire. La suite est réservée aux abonnés.

We want to thank the writer of this short article for this remarkable material

Covid-19 : sous la pression de l’opinion publique, le Québec assouplit les sévères restrictions imposées à la population

" } ["summary"]=> string(818) "Un magasin fermé, dans un centre commercial de Montréal, le 2 janvier 2022. GRAHAM HUGHES / AP Depuis que la cinquième vague de Covid a frappé de plein fouet le Québec, avec près de 6 000 nouveaux cas quotidiens déclarés à la mi-janvier, mais surtout un pic de 3 425 hospitalisations dans une province de moins 8,5 millions ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(5508) "

Depuis que la cinquième vague de Covid a frappé de plein fouet le Québec, avec près de 6 000 nouveaux cas quotidiens déclarés à la mi-janvier, mais surtout un pic de 3 425 hospitalisations dans une province de moins 8,5 millions d’habitants, le premier ministre François Legault (Coalition Avenir Québec, centre droit nationaliste) croyait pouvoir tenir droit dans ses bottes : « On ne peut pas se permettre d’assouplir davantage » répétait-il encore le 20 janvier.

Il avait annoncé dans l’urgence, la veille du jour de l’an, un nouveau tour de vis, avec interdiction des rassemblements privés hors bulle familiale, fermeture immédiate des bars et restaurants et même retour du couvre-feu, un dispositif unique sur tout le territoire nord-américain. Des restrictions sévères qui ne faisaient que confirmer la place de champion mondial qu’occupe le Québec, avec plus de 400 jours de confinement imposés à sa population depuis le déclenchement de la pandémie.

Lire aussi Article réservé à nos abonnés « Enfin, les Français vont revenir » : Montréal compte beaucoup sur le retour des touristes

Mais mardi 25 janvier a eu lieu un revirement total, malgré une situation épidémiologique inchangée : le chef du gouvernement a dévoilé les premières étapes d’un lent déconfinement à partir de la fin du mois, avec réouverture des restaurants puis des salles de spectacle à la clé.

Incohérence des mesures gouvernementales

« Nous n’étions pas la Chine qui reconfine des millions d’habitants pour quelques cas de Covid, mais nous n’en étions pas si loin », commente en plaisantant Benoît Barbeau, spécialiste en virologie à l’Université du Québec à Montréal. Selon lui « la fragilité du système de soins québécois, en manque de lits et de personnels depuis des décennies, ajoutée au traumatisme de l’hécatombe survenue dans les résidences de personnes âgées lors de la première vague [4 000 décès au printemps 2020] » explique que le gouvernement de François Legault ait été tétanisé à l’idée d’assouplir sa politique.

Pour autant ajoute-t-il, « la question de l’acceptabilité sociale d’une telle politique a fini par se poser. Il est difficile de continuer à imposer des sacrifices sans fin à une population, qui a par ailleurs pleinement joué le jeu de la vaccination [82,6 % de la population éligible a reçu deux doses de vaccin] ».

Lire le décryptage : Article réservé à nos abonnés Au Québec, la pandémie révélatrice d’un système de santé exsangue

Pour la première fois depuis le début de l’épidémie, la réticence des Québécois à observer les consignes sanitaires a en effet débordé du petit cercle des antivax. Une pâtissière de la région du Saguenay, située au nord de la province, est devenue le visage de la désobéissance civile. Cette Française installée au Québec depuis 1999 a bravé l’interdit en rouvrant son salon de thé à sa clientèle en début d’année. Malgré l’intervention de la police et le constat d’infraction dressé — qui lui vaudra une amende quotidienne comprise entre 1 000 et 6 000 dollars, soit entre 700 et 4 230 euros —, elle n’en démordait pas : il en allait désormais de la survie de son commerce et de la santé mentale de tous.

Il vous reste 43.5% de cet article à lire. La suite est réservée aux abonnés.

We want to thank the writer of this short article for this remarkable material

Covid-19 : sous la pression de l’opinion publique, le Québec assouplit les sévères restrictions imposées à la population

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1643303679) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(82) "Muere el actor Sidney Poitier; abrió las puertas del cine para los afroamericanos" ["link"]=> string(113) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/muere-el-actor-sidney-poitier-abrio-las-puertas-del-cine-para-los-afroamericanos/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Sally Scully" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 27 Jan 2022 16:42:21 +0000" ["category"]=> string(76) "CelebrityabrióactorafroamericanosCinedellaslosMuereparaPoitierpuertasSidney" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=10187" ["description"]=> string(726) "Sidney Poitier, cuya interpretación de héroes decididos y dignos en películas como “To Sir With Love”, “In the Heat of the Night” y “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” lo estableció como el primer ídolo afroamericano de Hollywood y ayudó a abrir la puerta de la industria cinematográfica, ha fallecido a los 94 años. Su muerte ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6317) "

Sidney Poitier, cuya interpretación de héroes decididos y dignos en películas como “To Sir With Love”, “In the Heat of the Night” y “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” lo estableció como el primer ídolo afroamericano de Hollywood y ayudó a abrir la puerta de la industria cinematográfica, ha fallecido a los 94 años.

Su muerte fue confirmada por Eugene Torchon-Newry, director general interino del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores en las Bahamas, donde creció el Sr. Poitier. No se proporcionaron otros detalles de inmediato.

El Sr. Poitier, cuyo premio de la Academia por la película de 1963 “Lilies of the Field” lo convirtió en el primer artista afroamericano en ganar en la categoría de mejor actor, saltó a la fama cuando el movimiento de derechos civiles comenzaba a progresar en los Estados Unidos. Sus roles tendían a reflejar los objetivos integracionistas pacíficos de la lucha. Aunque a menudo hervía a fuego lento con ira reprimida, sus personajes respondieron a la injusticia con una resolución tranquila. Encontraron el odio con la razón y el perdón, enviando un mensaje tranquilizador a las audiencias blancas y exponiendo al Sr. Poitier a un ataque como un tío Tom cuando el movimiento de derechos civiles tomó un giro más militante a fines de la década de 1960.

“Es una elección, una elección clara”, dijo Poitier sobre sus papeles cinematográficos en una entrevista de 1967. “Si el tejido de la sociedad fuera diferente, gritaría a las alturas para interpretar a los villanos y tratar con diferentes imágenes de la vida de los negros que serían más dimensionales. Pero que me condenen si hago eso en esta etapa del juego “.

En ese momento, Poitier era uno de los actores mejor pagados de Hollywood y uno de los principales sorteos de taquilla, ocupando el quinto lugar entre los actores masculinos en la encuesta de propietarios y críticos de cines de la revista Box Office, detrás de Richard Burton, Paul Newman, Lee Marvin. y John Wayne. Sin embargo, la aprensión racial no permitiría que Hollywood lo eligiera como un protagonista romántico, a pesar de su buena apariencia.

“Pensar en el hombre negro estadounidense en circunstancias socio-sexuales románticas es difícil, ya sabes”, le dijo a un entrevistador. “Y las razones por las que son legión y demasiadas para analizar”.

Poitier a menudo se encontraba en papeles limitados y santos que, sin embargo, representaban un avance importante en los papeles degradantes ofrecidos por Hollywood en el pasado. En “No Way Out” (1950), su primer papel importante en una película, interpretó a un médico perseguido por un paciente racista, y en “Cry, the Beloved Country” (1952), basada en la novela de Alan Paton sobre el racismo en Sudáfrica. , apareció como un joven sacerdote. Su personaje en “Blackboard Jungle” (1955), un estudiante con problemas en una dura escuela pública de la ciudad de Nueva York, ve la luz y finalmente se pone del lado de Glenn Ford, el maestro que intenta comunicarse con él.

En “The Defiant Ones” (1958), una fábula racial que lo consagró como una estrella y le valió una nominación al Premio de la Academia al mejor actor, era un prisionero fugitivo, esposado a un compañero convicto (y racista virulento) interpretado por Tony Curtis. El premio al mejor actor llegó en 1964 por su actuación en la película de bajo presupuesto “Lilies of the Field”, como un manitas itinerante que ayudaba a un grupo de monjas alemanas a construir una iglesia en el desierto del suroeste.

En 1967, Poitier apareció en tres de las películas más taquilleras de Hollywood, lo que lo elevó a la cima de su popularidad. “In the Heat of Night” lo colocó frente a Rod Steiger, como un sheriff indolente e intolerante, con quien Virgil Tibbs, el detective de Filadelfia interpretado por Poitier, debe trabajar en una investigación de asesinato en Mississippi. (En una línea indeleble, el detective insiste en el respeto del sheriff cuando declara: “¡Me llaman Sr. Tibbs!”) En “To Sir, With Love” era un profesor preocupado en una dura escuela secundaria de Londres, y en ” Adivina quién viene a cenar ”interpretó a un médico cuya carrera pone a prueba los principios liberales de sus futuros suegros, interpretados por Spencer Tracy y Katharine Hepburn. 

A lo largo de su carrera, un gran peso de importancia racial se apoderó de Poitier y de los personajes que interpretó. “Me sentí como si estuviera representando a 15, 18 millones de personas con cada movimiento que hice”, escribió una vez.

We would like to give thanks to the author of this post for this awesome material

Muere el actor Sidney Poitier; abrió las puertas del cine para los afroamericanos

" } ["summary"]=> string(726) "Sidney Poitier, cuya interpretación de héroes decididos y dignos en películas como “To Sir With Love”, “In the Heat of the Night” y “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” lo estableció como el primer ídolo afroamericano de Hollywood y ayudó a abrir la puerta de la industria cinematográfica, ha fallecido a los 94 años. Su muerte ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(6317) "

Sidney Poitier, cuya interpretación de héroes decididos y dignos en películas como “To Sir With Love”, “In the Heat of the Night” y “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” lo estableció como el primer ídolo afroamericano de Hollywood y ayudó a abrir la puerta de la industria cinematográfica, ha fallecido a los 94 años.

Su muerte fue confirmada por Eugene Torchon-Newry, director general interino del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores en las Bahamas, donde creció el Sr. Poitier. No se proporcionaron otros detalles de inmediato.

El Sr. Poitier, cuyo premio de la Academia por la película de 1963 “Lilies of the Field” lo convirtió en el primer artista afroamericano en ganar en la categoría de mejor actor, saltó a la fama cuando el movimiento de derechos civiles comenzaba a progresar en los Estados Unidos. Sus roles tendían a reflejar los objetivos integracionistas pacíficos de la lucha. Aunque a menudo hervía a fuego lento con ira reprimida, sus personajes respondieron a la injusticia con una resolución tranquila. Encontraron el odio con la razón y el perdón, enviando un mensaje tranquilizador a las audiencias blancas y exponiendo al Sr. Poitier a un ataque como un tío Tom cuando el movimiento de derechos civiles tomó un giro más militante a fines de la década de 1960.

“Es una elección, una elección clara”, dijo Poitier sobre sus papeles cinematográficos en una entrevista de 1967. “Si el tejido de la sociedad fuera diferente, gritaría a las alturas para interpretar a los villanos y tratar con diferentes imágenes de la vida de los negros que serían más dimensionales. Pero que me condenen si hago eso en esta etapa del juego “.

En ese momento, Poitier era uno de los actores mejor pagados de Hollywood y uno de los principales sorteos de taquilla, ocupando el quinto lugar entre los actores masculinos en la encuesta de propietarios y críticos de cines de la revista Box Office, detrás de Richard Burton, Paul Newman, Lee Marvin. y John Wayne. Sin embargo, la aprensión racial no permitiría que Hollywood lo eligiera como un protagonista romántico, a pesar de su buena apariencia.

“Pensar en el hombre negro estadounidense en circunstancias socio-sexuales románticas es difícil, ya sabes”, le dijo a un entrevistador. “Y las razones por las que son legión y demasiadas para analizar”.

Poitier a menudo se encontraba en papeles limitados y santos que, sin embargo, representaban un avance importante en los papeles degradantes ofrecidos por Hollywood en el pasado. En “No Way Out” (1950), su primer papel importante en una película, interpretó a un médico perseguido por un paciente racista, y en “Cry, the Beloved Country” (1952), basada en la novela de Alan Paton sobre el racismo en Sudáfrica. , apareció como un joven sacerdote. Su personaje en “Blackboard Jungle” (1955), un estudiante con problemas en una dura escuela pública de la ciudad de Nueva York, ve la luz y finalmente se pone del lado de Glenn Ford, el maestro que intenta comunicarse con él.

En “The Defiant Ones” (1958), una fábula racial que lo consagró como una estrella y le valió una nominación al Premio de la Academia al mejor actor, era un prisionero fugitivo, esposado a un compañero convicto (y racista virulento) interpretado por Tony Curtis. El premio al mejor actor llegó en 1964 por su actuación en la película de bajo presupuesto “Lilies of the Field”, como un manitas itinerante que ayudaba a un grupo de monjas alemanas a construir una iglesia en el desierto del suroeste.

En 1967, Poitier apareció en tres de las películas más taquilleras de Hollywood, lo que lo elevó a la cima de su popularidad. “In the Heat of Night” lo colocó frente a Rod Steiger, como un sheriff indolente e intolerante, con quien Virgil Tibbs, el detective de Filadelfia interpretado por Poitier, debe trabajar en una investigación de asesinato en Mississippi. (En una línea indeleble, el detective insiste en el respeto del sheriff cuando declara: “¡Me llaman Sr. Tibbs!”) En “To Sir, With Love” era un profesor preocupado en una dura escuela secundaria de Londres, y en ” Adivina quién viene a cenar ”interpretó a un médico cuya carrera pone a prueba los principios liberales de sus futuros suegros, interpretados por Spencer Tracy y Katharine Hepburn. 

A lo largo de su carrera, un gran peso de importancia racial se apoderó de Poitier y de los personajes que interpretó. “Me sentí como si estuviera representando a 15, 18 millones de personas con cada movimiento que hice”, escribió una vez.

We would like to give thanks to the author of this post for this awesome material

Muere el actor Sidney Poitier; abrió las puertas del cine para los afroamericanos

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1643301741) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(39) "California mice eat monarch butterflies" ["link"]=> string(72) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/california-mice-eat-monarch-butterflies/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Tony Grantly" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 27 Jan 2022 16:23:27 +0000" ["category"]=> string(53) "Health And SciencebutterfliesCaliforniaeatmicemonarch" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=10182" ["description"]=> string(617) "Journal Reference: Sara B. Weinstein, M. Denise Dearing. Harvest mice ( Reithrodontomys megalotis) consume monarch butterflies ( Danaus plexippus ). Ecology, 2021; DOI: 10.1002/ecy.3607 In a new study, University of Utah biologists found that mice at California monarch overwintering sites can also consume monarch butterflies. Working at one of the largest monarch aggregations outside of ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4762) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Sara B. Weinstein, M. Denise Dearing. Harvest mice ( Reithrodontomys megalotis) consume monarch butterflies ( Danaus plexippus ). Ecology, 2021; DOI: 10.1002/ecy.3607

In a new study, University of Utah biologists found that mice at California monarch overwintering sites can also consume monarch butterflies. Working at one of the largest monarch aggregations outside of Mexico, Pismo State Beach Monarch Butterfly Grove, the researchers discovered that the western harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys megalotis) also ate the grounded monarchs. However, with the precipitous decline in western monarch populations, this butterfly buffet may be in jeopardy.

The authors do not think that rodents are contributing to the western monarch decline, nor that the monarchs are the only thing that mice can eat. Rather, documenting this new feeding behavior is a reminder of how little we know about the interactions that may be lost as insect populations decline.

“We are in an insect apocalypse right now. There are estimates that 40% of studied invertebrate species are threatened and that over 70% of flying insect biomass is already gone. This is devastating on its own and is also going to have enormous impacts on the other organisms that feed on insects,” said Sara Weinstein, the postdoctoral researcher who led the study.

“Western monarchs and other western butterflies need conservation attention and part of that awareness-raising is illuminating the many ways these animals are interconnected to other insects, birds, mammals, as well as our human communities. This study helps us appreciate more deeply how fewer butterflies means less food for other native animals” said Emma Pelton, senior conservation biologist at the Xerces Society.

The study published in the journal Ecology on Dec. 12, 2021.

To study mouse-monarch interactions, the researchers first trapped rodents in the grove in February 2020. The rodents were released, but their feces were kept to screen for monarch DNA — which they found in one sample. This first survey occurred in late winter as monarchs were leaving the aggregation and few remained for mice to munch. Weinstein and colleagues intended to return the following fall during peak monarch season. However, after years of decline, the western monarch population crashed.

“At a site where 100,000 butterflies used to roost, in 2020 there where were fewer than 200 monarchs. So, we had to change tactics,” Weinstein said. “We tested whether rodents would feed on the butterflies using captive-reared monarchs.”

Weinstein set up lab-reared monarch carcasses under camera traps and captured footage of wild harvest miceeating butterflies. She also caught a half dozen mice and offered them monarchs. The mice ate monarchs, typically favoring the abdomen or thorax, high-calorie parts with fewer toxins.

“Many rodent species are likely to have some resistance to cardenolides in monarchs, due to genetic changes at the site where these toxins bind,” said Weinstein. “The Pismo Grove is one of hundreds of western monarch aggregation sites, and it seems likely that, at least in the past, rodents throughout the western monarch range may have supplemented their winter diets with monarchs. If you can handle the cardenolides in a monarch, their bodies are full of fat and offer a pretty good meal.”

This meal will be a lot harder to find, as over 90% of western monarchs have disappeared in the last 40 years. The missing beauties will surely impact the ecosystem that depends on them for food.

“When monarch numbers crashed last year and the project started to go sideways, Sara cleverly rescued it by growing her own monarchs and obtaining frozen ones from researchers,” said Denise Dearing, senior author of the study and Distinguished Professor of biology at the U. “Her creative solution advanced our understanding of the interactions between mice and monarchs, even during a time of limited monarch numbers. It lays the groundwork for future research in this area.”

We wish to say thanks to the writer of this post for this awesome content

California mice eat monarch butterflies

" } ["summary"]=> string(617) "Journal Reference: Sara B. Weinstein, M. Denise Dearing. Harvest mice ( Reithrodontomys megalotis) consume monarch butterflies ( Danaus plexippus ). Ecology, 2021; DOI: 10.1002/ecy.3607 In a new study, University of Utah biologists found that mice at California monarch overwintering sites can also consume monarch butterflies. Working at one of the largest monarch aggregations outside of ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4762) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Sara B. Weinstein, M. Denise Dearing. Harvest mice ( Reithrodontomys megalotis) consume monarch butterflies ( Danaus plexippus ). Ecology, 2021; DOI: 10.1002/ecy.3607

In a new study, University of Utah biologists found that mice at California monarch overwintering sites can also consume monarch butterflies. Working at one of the largest monarch aggregations outside of Mexico, Pismo State Beach Monarch Butterfly Grove, the researchers discovered that the western harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys megalotis) also ate the grounded monarchs. However, with the precipitous decline in western monarch populations, this butterfly buffet may be in jeopardy.

The authors do not think that rodents are contributing to the western monarch decline, nor that the monarchs are the only thing that mice can eat. Rather, documenting this new feeding behavior is a reminder of how little we know about the interactions that may be lost as insect populations decline.

“We are in an insect apocalypse right now. There are estimates that 40% of studied invertebrate species are threatened and that over 70% of flying insect biomass is already gone. This is devastating on its own and is also going to have enormous impacts on the other organisms that feed on insects,” said Sara Weinstein, the postdoctoral researcher who led the study.

“Western monarchs and other western butterflies need conservation attention and part of that awareness-raising is illuminating the many ways these animals are interconnected to other insects, birds, mammals, as well as our human communities. This study helps us appreciate more deeply how fewer butterflies means less food for other native animals” said Emma Pelton, senior conservation biologist at the Xerces Society.

The study published in the journal Ecology on Dec. 12, 2021.

To study mouse-monarch interactions, the researchers first trapped rodents in the grove in February 2020. The rodents were released, but their feces were kept to screen for monarch DNA — which they found in one sample. This first survey occurred in late winter as monarchs were leaving the aggregation and few remained for mice to munch. Weinstein and colleagues intended to return the following fall during peak monarch season. However, after years of decline, the western monarch population crashed.

“At a site where 100,000 butterflies used to roost, in 2020 there where were fewer than 200 monarchs. So, we had to change tactics,” Weinstein said. “We tested whether rodents would feed on the butterflies using captive-reared monarchs.”

Weinstein set up lab-reared monarch carcasses under camera traps and captured footage of wild harvest miceeating butterflies. She also caught a half dozen mice and offered them monarchs. The mice ate monarchs, typically favoring the abdomen or thorax, high-calorie parts with fewer toxins.

“Many rodent species are likely to have some resistance to cardenolides in monarchs, due to genetic changes at the site where these toxins bind,” said Weinstein. “The Pismo Grove is one of hundreds of western monarch aggregation sites, and it seems likely that, at least in the past, rodents throughout the western monarch range may have supplemented their winter diets with monarchs. If you can handle the cardenolides in a monarch, their bodies are full of fat and offer a pretty good meal.”

This meal will be a lot harder to find, as over 90% of western monarchs have disappeared in the last 40 years. The missing beauties will surely impact the ecosystem that depends on them for food.

“When monarch numbers crashed last year and the project started to go sideways, Sara cleverly rescued it by growing her own monarchs and obtaining frozen ones from researchers,” said Denise Dearing, senior author of the study and Distinguished Professor of biology at the U. “Her creative solution advanced our understanding of the interactions between mice and monarchs, even during a time of limited monarch numbers. It lays the groundwork for future research in this area.”

We wish to say thanks to the writer of this post for this awesome content

California mice eat monarch butterflies

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1643300607) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(100) "Italia’s Got Talent: Mara Maionchi regala il golden buzzer a Davide, trombettista 14enne di Napoli" ["link"]=> string(128) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/italias-got-talent-mara-maionchi-regala-il-golden-buzzer-a-davide-trombettista-14enne-di-napoli/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Tom Pauler" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 27 Jan 2022 16:04:55 +0000" ["category"]=> string(80) "Hobbies14ennebuzzerDavideGoldenItaliasMaionchiMaraNapoliregalaTalenttrombettista" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=10176" ["description"]=> string(779) "Italia’s Got Talent: Mara Maionchi regala il golden buzzer a Davide, trombettista 14enne di Napoli. Nello show prodotto da Fremantle per Sky, durante la puntata di mercoledì è arrivata la prima ospite, Bebe Vio, la “studentessa con una straordinaria passione per la scherma” vincitrice di Europei, Mondiali e Paralimpiadi, che seduta al tavolo è stata per alcuni ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6770) "

Italia’s Got Talent: Mara Maionchi regala il golden buzzer a Davide, trombettista 14enne di Napoli. Nello show prodotto da Fremantle per Sky, durante la puntata di mercoledì è arrivata la prima ospite, Bebe Vio, la “studentessa con una straordinaria passione per la scherma” vincitrice di Europei, Mondiali e Paralimpiadi, che seduta al tavolo è stata per alcuni minuti quinto giudice dando i suoi commenti ai concorrenti sul palco.

 

Leggi anche > Torna Italia’s Got Talent: in giuria arriva Elio. Ecco tutte le novità della nuova stagione

 

Elio aveva rotto il ghiaccio nel primo appuntamento, mercoledì 26 gennaio è stata Mara Maionchi a premere il pulsantone dorato di Italia’s Got Talent: il suo Golden Buzzer è il giovanissimo trombettista Davide Battista, 14 anni di Melito di Napoli, che ha proposto la sua versione di “Voce”, hit dello scorso anno di Madame.

 

Oltre alla confermata “rivalità” tra Elio e Frank, ai due estremi del tavolo ma sempre prontissimi a punzecchiarsi a vicenda, tenuti distanti senza successo da Mara Maionchi e Federica Pellegrini, anche la seconda serata si è svolta con l’alternanza tra forti emozioni, risate trascinanti e prove adrenaliniche. A tenere a bada i giudici e ad accompagnare prima e dopo la performance i concorrenti Lodovica Comello, che anche ieri ha conservato il suo inedito superpotere del Golden Buzzer, lasciando la pioggia di coriandoli d’oro alla sola Mara. Quest’ultima è stata protagonista di un altro momento irresistibile della serata, un attacco di “ridarola” senza freni mentre sul palco il gruppo dei Branco Ottico, cinque appassionati di fotografia marchigiani, scattava una foto a Elio con una enorme macchina fotografica d’epoca: l’immagine poi rimasta impressa sulla pellicola, non particolarmente bella, non le ha lasciato scampo (per i concorrenti, 3 sì e turno superato).

 

Al contrario, 4 sì convinti per Christine Azzolini, 23enne della provincia di Parma, atleta Strong Woman (in poche parole, lo sport delle donne più forti del mondo), che ha dimostrato di saper sollevare senza troppa fatica, con i suoi soli 64 chili, anche un ragazzone alto e piazzato come Frank Matano; e per Andrea e Samuele della compagnia bergamasca Sabbie Luminose, rispettivamente disegnatore di sabbia e ballerino, che hanno commosso tutti unendo le loro due arti per creare con i granelli di sabbia e una coreografia una performance dal vivo ispirata alla strage alla stazione di Bologna del 2 agosto 1980.

Sì unanime per Elom, 33enne originario di Accra (Ghana) e ora a Mentana, a pochi chilometri da Roma: ha cantato “True Colors” di Cyndi Lauper per dimostrare che i colori che abbiamo dentro sono più importanti di quelli che si vedono fuori; e per i robot umanoidi di Manuel Catalano e Maria Fossati, rispettivamente ricercatore e designer dell’Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia di Genova, che si sono letteralmente sfidati per dimostrare di poter operare anche in ambienti remoti o in ambienti domestici.

 

Hanno strappato grandi applausi due performance acrobatiche: quella del 16enne Leonardo Togni di Verona, che si è esibito con un numero di salti su un tappeto elastico “nascosto” nella struttura di un letto, riuscendo anche a mettersi il pigiama in questa maniera spettacolare; e quella delle due atlete ucraine Maryna e Tetiana, funamboliche e straordinarie nel sollevarsi a diversi metri di altezza reggendosi a vicenda tramite delle cinghie, in un numero che richiedeva totale fiducia reciproca. Bottino pieno anche per Lorenzo Maragoni, comico 36enne di Padova che ha recitato un monologo ricco di giochi di parole; e per Tyrone Laner, da Madrid, che si è esibito – insieme alla sua partner lavorativa Coral – in un numero che spaziava dal lazo al lancio dei coltelli.

Il 73enne musicista napoletano Roberto Rossini, molto abile nell’uso dell’armonica nasale, ha eseguito proprio “La Terra dei cachi” degli Elio e le Storie Tese, ha ottenuto 4 sì; lo stesso dicasi per la crew anti-standard della H Family, composta da 10 ballerini – un uomo e nove donne, tutti contrari all’omologazione e agli stereotipi sia nella danza sia nella vita – tra i 12 e i 26 anni, che ha proposto una coreografia trascinante e potentissima capace di strappare 4 sì convinti. Il palermitano Giuseppe Pecoraro, ballerino autodidatta di break dance di 55 anni: il suo «talento naturale, rimasto nascosto per anni» ha sorpreso tutti e il suo ipnotico movimento di pancia ha conquistato il tavolo.

 

Non hanno convinto invece il 45enne Francesco Pandolfi, maestro di arti marziali di Quartu Sant’Elena (Cagliari) che ha portato in scena una dimostrazione di difesa personale che ha raccolto i sì solo da Frank ed Elio; e la coreografia dei Les Culitas, una crew che deve il suo nome proprio alla parte del corpo protagonista della scena. I Sit Ballet, due ballerini romani tra i 18 e i 35 anni che hanno presentato un nuovo stile di danza, il “sitcom ballet”, non sono riusciti ad andare oltre al sì del solo Elio.

 

Risate ed emozioni, ma soprattutto le parrucche di Elio, torneranno nelle prossime puntate di Italia’s Got Talent: il 2 febbraio ci sarà un best of delle audizioni, il nuovo appuntamento inedito è atteso per mercoledì 9 febbraio, sempre su Sky Uno e in streaming su NOW. Il secondo appuntamento della nuova stagione di Italia’s Got Talent, ieri su Sky Uno/+1 e on demand, ha registrato 482.000 spettatori medi e una share dell’1,4%, in crescita del +5% rispetto all’esordio e del +26% rispetto al dato pay dell’omologa puntata dello scorso anno. 


Ultimo aggiornamento: Giovedì 27 Gennaio 2022, 14:18

© RIPRODUZIONE RISERVATA

We want to say thanks to the writer of this short article for this amazing content

Italia’s Got Talent: Mara Maionchi regala il golden buzzer a Davide, trombettista 14enne di Napoli

" } ["summary"]=> string(779) "Italia’s Got Talent: Mara Maionchi regala il golden buzzer a Davide, trombettista 14enne di Napoli. Nello show prodotto da Fremantle per Sky, durante la puntata di mercoledì è arrivata la prima ospite, Bebe Vio, la “studentessa con una straordinaria passione per la scherma” vincitrice di Europei, Mondiali e Paralimpiadi, che seduta al tavolo è stata per alcuni ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(6770) "

Italia’s Got Talent: Mara Maionchi regala il golden buzzer a Davide, trombettista 14enne di Napoli. Nello show prodotto da Fremantle per Sky, durante la puntata di mercoledì è arrivata la prima ospite, Bebe Vio, la “studentessa con una straordinaria passione per la scherma” vincitrice di Europei, Mondiali e Paralimpiadi, che seduta al tavolo è stata per alcuni minuti quinto giudice dando i suoi commenti ai concorrenti sul palco.

 

Leggi anche > Torna Italia’s Got Talent: in giuria arriva Elio. Ecco tutte le novità della nuova stagione

 

Elio aveva rotto il ghiaccio nel primo appuntamento, mercoledì 26 gennaio è stata Mara Maionchi a premere il pulsantone dorato di Italia’s Got Talent: il suo Golden Buzzer è il giovanissimo trombettista Davide Battista, 14 anni di Melito di Napoli, che ha proposto la sua versione di “Voce”, hit dello scorso anno di Madame.

 

Oltre alla confermata “rivalità” tra Elio e Frank, ai due estremi del tavolo ma sempre prontissimi a punzecchiarsi a vicenda, tenuti distanti senza successo da Mara Maionchi e Federica Pellegrini, anche la seconda serata si è svolta con l’alternanza tra forti emozioni, risate trascinanti e prove adrenaliniche. A tenere a bada i giudici e ad accompagnare prima e dopo la performance i concorrenti Lodovica Comello, che anche ieri ha conservato il suo inedito superpotere del Golden Buzzer, lasciando la pioggia di coriandoli d’oro alla sola Mara. Quest’ultima è stata protagonista di un altro momento irresistibile della serata, un attacco di “ridarola” senza freni mentre sul palco il gruppo dei Branco Ottico, cinque appassionati di fotografia marchigiani, scattava una foto a Elio con una enorme macchina fotografica d’epoca: l’immagine poi rimasta impressa sulla pellicola, non particolarmente bella, non le ha lasciato scampo (per i concorrenti, 3 sì e turno superato).

 

Al contrario, 4 sì convinti per Christine Azzolini, 23enne della provincia di Parma, atleta Strong Woman (in poche parole, lo sport delle donne più forti del mondo), che ha dimostrato di saper sollevare senza troppa fatica, con i suoi soli 64 chili, anche un ragazzone alto e piazzato come Frank Matano; e per Andrea e Samuele della compagnia bergamasca Sabbie Luminose, rispettivamente disegnatore di sabbia e ballerino, che hanno commosso tutti unendo le loro due arti per creare con i granelli di sabbia e una coreografia una performance dal vivo ispirata alla strage alla stazione di Bologna del 2 agosto 1980.

Sì unanime per Elom, 33enne originario di Accra (Ghana) e ora a Mentana, a pochi chilometri da Roma: ha cantato “True Colors” di Cyndi Lauper per dimostrare che i colori che abbiamo dentro sono più importanti di quelli che si vedono fuori; e per i robot umanoidi di Manuel Catalano e Maria Fossati, rispettivamente ricercatore e designer dell’Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia di Genova, che si sono letteralmente sfidati per dimostrare di poter operare anche in ambienti remoti o in ambienti domestici.

 

Hanno strappato grandi applausi due performance acrobatiche: quella del 16enne Leonardo Togni di Verona, che si è esibito con un numero di salti su un tappeto elastico “nascosto” nella struttura di un letto, riuscendo anche a mettersi il pigiama in questa maniera spettacolare; e quella delle due atlete ucraine Maryna e Tetiana, funamboliche e straordinarie nel sollevarsi a diversi metri di altezza reggendosi a vicenda tramite delle cinghie, in un numero che richiedeva totale fiducia reciproca. Bottino pieno anche per Lorenzo Maragoni, comico 36enne di Padova che ha recitato un monologo ricco di giochi di parole; e per Tyrone Laner, da Madrid, che si è esibito – insieme alla sua partner lavorativa Coral – in un numero che spaziava dal lazo al lancio dei coltelli.

Il 73enne musicista napoletano Roberto Rossini, molto abile nell’uso dell’armonica nasale, ha eseguito proprio “La Terra dei cachi” degli Elio e le Storie Tese, ha ottenuto 4 sì; lo stesso dicasi per la crew anti-standard della H Family, composta da 10 ballerini – un uomo e nove donne, tutti contrari all’omologazione e agli stereotipi sia nella danza sia nella vita – tra i 12 e i 26 anni, che ha proposto una coreografia trascinante e potentissima capace di strappare 4 sì convinti. Il palermitano Giuseppe Pecoraro, ballerino autodidatta di break dance di 55 anni: il suo «talento naturale, rimasto nascosto per anni» ha sorpreso tutti e il suo ipnotico movimento di pancia ha conquistato il tavolo.

 

Non hanno convinto invece il 45enne Francesco Pandolfi, maestro di arti marziali di Quartu Sant’Elena (Cagliari) che ha portato in scena una dimostrazione di difesa personale che ha raccolto i sì solo da Frank ed Elio; e la coreografia dei Les Culitas, una crew che deve il suo nome proprio alla parte del corpo protagonista della scena. I Sit Ballet, due ballerini romani tra i 18 e i 35 anni che hanno presentato un nuovo stile di danza, il “sitcom ballet”, non sono riusciti ad andare oltre al sì del solo Elio.

 

Risate ed emozioni, ma soprattutto le parrucche di Elio, torneranno nelle prossime puntate di Italia’s Got Talent: il 2 febbraio ci sarà un best of delle audizioni, il nuovo appuntamento inedito è atteso per mercoledì 9 febbraio, sempre su Sky Uno e in streaming su NOW. Il secondo appuntamento della nuova stagione di Italia’s Got Talent, ieri su Sky Uno/+1 e on demand, ha registrato 482.000 spettatori medi e una share dell’1,4%, in crescita del +5% rispetto all’esordio e del +26% rispetto al dato pay dell’omologa puntata dello scorso anno. 


Ultimo aggiornamento: Giovedì 27 Gennaio 2022, 14:18

© RIPRODUZIONE RISERVATA

We want to say thanks to the writer of this short article for this amazing content

Italia’s Got Talent: Mara Maionchi regala il golden buzzer a Davide, trombettista 14enne di Napoli

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1643299495) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(51) "Gratitude is the key to happiness – Food Pharmacy" ["link"]=> string(80) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/gratitude-is-the-key-to-happiness-food-pharmacy/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Paula Hooper" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 27 Jan 2022 16:02:42 +0000" ["category"]=> string(42) "LifestyleFoodgratitudehappinesskeyPharmacy" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=10170" ["description"]=> string(610) "Food Pharmacy Store ABs integritetspolicy Food Pharmacy Store AB (“Food Pharmacy”) works to ensure that your privacy is protected when using our services. Food Pharmacy is responsible for the personal data you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). In this privacy policy, we inform you about why and in what ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6196) "

Food Pharmacy Store ABs integritetspolicy

Food Pharmacy Store AB (“Food Pharmacy”) works to ensure that your privacy is protected when using our services. Food Pharmacy is responsible for the personal data you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

In this privacy policy, we inform you about why and in what way we process personal data and how we use cookies. Here you can also read about what you as a registered person have for rights and where you can turn to with questions or comments related to Food Pharmacy’s personal data processing. The privacy policy was last updated in September 2019.

What kind of personal data do we collect?

Customer
We collect personal information that you send to us, e.g. when you place orders and contact our customer service. The personal information that you send to us can e.g. include contact information, date of birth and payment information. In addition, we may collect certain personal data from external sources, e.g. credit information and address updates. When we do customer surveys, all user information is anonymized. Our legal basis for this personal data processing is to be able to fulfill the agreement against you as a customer or to be able to fulfill obligations according to law. Personal data is stored for 3 years.

Newsletters and offers
Personal information is also collected when registering our newsletter. If you have bought an item from us before, we also process your contact information in order to be able to send out offers to you. Such personal data processing is based on our legitimate interest. If you have been reached by unwanted mailings from us, you have, in accordance with the GDPR and the Marketing Act, always the right to oppose further mailings. You do this by clicking on the link in the email itself or by contacting us at info@foodpharmacy.se.

Membership
If you are a member of Food Pharmacy, we process your contact information and the information you provide in your profile. This processing of your personal data is required for us to be able to fulfill our obligations under the agreement / terms of membership. Personal data is stored until membership ends.

How do we use your personal information?
For the following purposes:

Where is your personal information stored?
The data are stored within the European Economic Area (EEA).

What are your rights?
You have the right to request information about the personal information we have about you. If your information is incorrect, incomplete or irrelevant, you can request that it be corrected or deleted. However, we can not delete your data in cases where there is a statutory requirement for storage for e.g. accounting rules, or when there are other legal reasons why the data must be saved. You also have the right to contact Datainspektionen at datainspektionen@datainspektionen.se to submit a complaint.

Who has access to your personal information?
We never sell, exchange or pass on your personal information for marketing purposes to third parties outside of Food Pharmacy. Information passed on to third parties is only used to provide the above services to you, e.g. carriers in connection with the delivery of goods, media agencies for the distribution of newsletters and credit information or debt collection agencies for information checks to verify identity, credit or debt collection.

We protect your personal information
We have technical and organizational measures to protect your data from unauthorized access. We continuously adapt our security measures. Our payment agents process your card and personal data in accordance with the international security standard. You can read more about these standards on our suppliers’ websites – Klarna.se and Stripe.com.

Cookies
A cookie is a text file that is saved on your computer or mobile device and is retrieved from it on later visits to our website. Food Pharmacy uses cookies to improve and simplify your visit. We do not use cookies to store personal information or to spread information to third parties. You can easily delete cookies from your computer or mobile device via the browser, or surf in anonymous mode.

We use cookies from third parties to collect statistics in aggregate form in analysis tools such as Google Analytics. The cookies used are both permanent and temporary cookies (session cookies). Permanent cookies are stored as files on your computer or mobile device for a maximum of 24 months. Temporary cookies are deleted when you close the browser.

To get more information about cookies and the Electronic Communications Act, you can visit the Swedish Post and Telecom Agency’s website.

Personal data manager
Food Pharmacy Store AB is responsible for the personal data that you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Ordinance (GDPR).

Food Pharmacy AB
Riddargatan 20
114 51 Stockholm
E-mail: info@foodpharmacy.se, jonna.andersson@foodpharmacy.se

We would like to say thanks to the author of this post for this remarkable material

Gratitude is the key to happiness – Food Pharmacy

" } ["summary"]=> string(610) "Food Pharmacy Store ABs integritetspolicy Food Pharmacy Store AB (“Food Pharmacy”) works to ensure that your privacy is protected when using our services. Food Pharmacy is responsible for the personal data you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). In this privacy policy, we inform you about why and in what ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(6196) "

Food Pharmacy Store ABs integritetspolicy

Food Pharmacy Store AB (“Food Pharmacy”) works to ensure that your privacy is protected when using our services. Food Pharmacy is responsible for the personal data you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

In this privacy policy, we inform you about why and in what way we process personal data and how we use cookies. Here you can also read about what you as a registered person have for rights and where you can turn to with questions or comments related to Food Pharmacy’s personal data processing. The privacy policy was last updated in September 2019.

What kind of personal data do we collect?

Customer
We collect personal information that you send to us, e.g. when you place orders and contact our customer service. The personal information that you send to us can e.g. include contact information, date of birth and payment information. In addition, we may collect certain personal data from external sources, e.g. credit information and address updates. When we do customer surveys, all user information is anonymized. Our legal basis for this personal data processing is to be able to fulfill the agreement against you as a customer or to be able to fulfill obligations according to law. Personal data is stored for 3 years.

Newsletters and offers
Personal information is also collected when registering our newsletter. If you have bought an item from us before, we also process your contact information in order to be able to send out offers to you. Such personal data processing is based on our legitimate interest. If you have been reached by unwanted mailings from us, you have, in accordance with the GDPR and the Marketing Act, always the right to oppose further mailings. You do this by clicking on the link in the email itself or by contacting us at info@foodpharmacy.se.

Membership
If you are a member of Food Pharmacy, we process your contact information and the information you provide in your profile. This processing of your personal data is required for us to be able to fulfill our obligations under the agreement / terms of membership. Personal data is stored until membership ends.

How do we use your personal information?
For the following purposes:

Where is your personal information stored?
The data are stored within the European Economic Area (EEA).

What are your rights?
You have the right to request information about the personal information we have about you. If your information is incorrect, incomplete or irrelevant, you can request that it be corrected or deleted. However, we can not delete your data in cases where there is a statutory requirement for storage for e.g. accounting rules, or when there are other legal reasons why the data must be saved. You also have the right to contact Datainspektionen at datainspektionen@datainspektionen.se to submit a complaint.

Who has access to your personal information?
We never sell, exchange or pass on your personal information for marketing purposes to third parties outside of Food Pharmacy. Information passed on to third parties is only used to provide the above services to you, e.g. carriers in connection with the delivery of goods, media agencies for the distribution of newsletters and credit information or debt collection agencies for information checks to verify identity, credit or debt collection.

We protect your personal information
We have technical and organizational measures to protect your data from unauthorized access. We continuously adapt our security measures. Our payment agents process your card and personal data in accordance with the international security standard. You can read more about these standards on our suppliers’ websites – Klarna.se and Stripe.com.

Cookies
A cookie is a text file that is saved on your computer or mobile device and is retrieved from it on later visits to our website. Food Pharmacy uses cookies to improve and simplify your visit. We do not use cookies to store personal information or to spread information to third parties. You can easily delete cookies from your computer or mobile device via the browser, or surf in anonymous mode.

We use cookies from third parties to collect statistics in aggregate form in analysis tools such as Google Analytics. The cookies used are both permanent and temporary cookies (session cookies). Permanent cookies are stored as files on your computer or mobile device for a maximum of 24 months. Temporary cookies are deleted when you close the browser.

To get more information about cookies and the Electronic Communications Act, you can visit the Swedish Post and Telecom Agency’s website.

Personal data manager
Food Pharmacy Store AB is responsible for the personal data that you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Ordinance (GDPR).

Food Pharmacy AB
Riddargatan 20
114 51 Stockholm
E-mail: info@foodpharmacy.se, jonna.andersson@foodpharmacy.se

We would like to say thanks to the author of this post for this remarkable material

Gratitude is the key to happiness – Food Pharmacy

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1643299362) } [7]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(72) "Realistic portraits of squishy layer that’s key to battery performance" ["link"]=> string(102) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/realistic-portraits-of-squishy-layer-thats-key-to-battery-performance/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Tony Grantly" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 27 Jan 2022 15:06:23 +0000" ["category"]=> string(69) "Health And SciencebatterykeylayerperformancePortraitsRealisticsquishy" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=10165" ["description"]=> string(674) "Journal Reference: Zewen Zhang, Yuzhang Li, Rong Xu, Weijiang Zhou, Yanbin Li, Solomon T. Oyakhire, Yecun Wu, Jinwei Xu, Hansen Wang, Zhiao Yu, David T. Boyle, William Huang, Yusheng Ye, Hao Chen, Jiayu Wan, Zhenan Bao, Wah Chiu, Yi Cui. Capturing the swelling of solid-electrolyte interphase in lithium metal batteries. Science, 2022; 375 (6576): 66 ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(7675) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Zewen Zhang, Yuzhang Li, Rong Xu, Weijiang Zhou, Yanbin Li, Solomon T. Oyakhire, Yecun Wu, Jinwei Xu, Hansen Wang, Zhiao Yu, David T. Boyle, William Huang, Yusheng Ye, Hao Chen, Jiayu Wan, Zhenan Bao, Wah Chiu, Yi Cui. Capturing the swelling of solid-electrolyte interphase in lithium metal batteries. Science, 2022; 375 (6576): 66 DOI: 10.1126/science.abi8703

But one of the hurdles that stand in the way is a silent battle between two of the battery’s parts. The liquid between the battery electrodes, known as the electrolyte, corrodes the surface of the lithium metal anode, coating it in a thin layer of gunk called the solid-electrolyte interphase, or SEI.

Although formation of SEI is believed to be inevitable, researchers hope to stabilize and control the growth of this layer in a way that maximizes the battery’s performance. But until now they have never had a clear picture of what the SEI looks like when it’s saturated with electrolyte, as it would be in a working battery.

Now, researchers from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have made the first high-res images of this layer in its natural plump, squishy state. This advance was made possible by cryogenic electron microscopy, or cryo-EM, a revolutionary technology that reveals details as small as atoms.

The results, they said, suggest that the right electrolyte can minimize the swelling and improve the battery’s performance — giving scientists a potential new way to tweak and improve battery design. They also give researchers a new tool for studying batteries in their everyday working environments.

The team described their work in a paper published in Science today.

“There are no other technologies that can look at this interface between the electrode and the electrolyte with such high resolution,” said Zewen Zhang, a Stanford PhD student who led the experiments with SLAC and Stanford professors Yi Cui and Wah Chiu. “We wanted to prove that we could image the interface at these previously inaccessible scales and see the pristine, native state of these materials as they are in batteries.”

Cui added, “We find this swelling is almost universal. Its effects have not been widely appreciated by the battery research community before, but we found that it has a significant impact on battery performance.”

A ‘thrilling’ tool for energy research

This is the latest in a series of groundbreaking results over the past five years that show cryo-EM, which was developed as a tool for biology, opens “thrilling opportunities” in energy research, the team wrote in a separate review of the field published in July in Accounts of Chemical Research.

Cryo-EM is a form of electron microscopy, which uses electrons rather than light to observe the world of the very small. By flash-freezing their samples into a clear, glassy state, scientists can look at the cellular machines that carry out life’s functions in their natural state and at atomic resolution. Recent improvements in cryo-EM have transformed it into a highly sought method for revealing biological structure in unprecedented detail, and three scientists were awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry for their pioneering contributions to its development.

Inspired by many success stories in biological cryo-EM, Cui teamed up with Chiu to explore whether cryo-EM could be as useful a tool for studying energy-related materials as it was for studying living systems.

One of the first things they looked at was one of those pesky SEI layers on a battery electrode. They published the first atomic-scale images of this layer in 2017, along with images of finger-like growths of lithium wire that can puncture the barrier between the two halves of the battery and cause short circuits or fires.

But to make those images they had to take the battery parts out of the electrolyte, so that the SEI dried into a shrunken state. What it looked like in a wet state inside a working battery was anyone’s guess.

Blotter paper to the rescue

To capture the SEI in its soggy native environment, the researchers came up with a way to make and freeze very thin films of the electrolyte liquid that contained tiny lithium metal wires, which offered a surface for corrosion and the formation of SEI.

First, they inserted a metal grid used for holding cryo-EM samples into a coin cell battery. When they removed it, thin films of electrolyte clung to tiny circular holes within the grid, held in place by surface tension just long enough to perform the remaining steps.

However, those films were still too thick for the electron beam to penetrate and produce sharp images. So Chiu suggested a fix: sopping up the excess liquid with blotter paper. The blotted grid was immediately plunged into liquid nitrogen to freeze the little films into a glassy state that perfectly preserved the SEI. All this took place in a closed system that protected the films from exposure to air.

The results were dramatic, Zhang said. In these wet environments, SEIs absorbed electrolyte and swelled to about twice their previous thickness.

When the team repeated the process with half a dozen other electrolytes of varying chemical compositions, they found that some produced much thicker SEI layers than others — and that the layers that swelled the most were associated with the worst battery performance.

“Right now that connection between SEI swelling behavior and performance applies to lithium metal anodes,” Zhang said, “but we think it should apply as a general rule to other metallic anodes, as well.”

The team also used the super-fine tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) to probe the surfaces of SEI layers and verify that they were more squishy in their wet, swollen state than in their dry state.

In the years since the 2017 paper revealed what cryo-EM can do for energy materials, it’s been used to zoom in on materials for solar cells and cage-like molecules called metal-organic frameworks that can be used in fuel cells, catalysis and gas storage.

As far as next steps, the researchers say they’d like to find a way to image these materials in 3D — and to image them while they’re still inside a working battery, for the most realistic picture yet.

Yi Cui is director of Stanford’s Precourt Institute for Energy and an investigator with the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES) at SLAC. Wah Chiu is co-director of the Stanford-SLAC Cryo-EM Facilities, where the cryo-EM imaging work for this study took place. Part of this work was performed at the Stanford Nano Shared Facilities (SNSF) and Stanford Nanofabrication Facility (SNF). The research was funded by the DOE Office of Science.

We would love to say thanks to the writer of this short article for this remarkable web content

Realistic portraits of squishy layer that’s key to battery performance

" } ["summary"]=> string(674) "Journal Reference: Zewen Zhang, Yuzhang Li, Rong Xu, Weijiang Zhou, Yanbin Li, Solomon T. Oyakhire, Yecun Wu, Jinwei Xu, Hansen Wang, Zhiao Yu, David T. Boyle, William Huang, Yusheng Ye, Hao Chen, Jiayu Wan, Zhenan Bao, Wah Chiu, Yi Cui. Capturing the swelling of solid-electrolyte interphase in lithium metal batteries. Science, 2022; 375 (6576): 66 ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(7675) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Zewen Zhang, Yuzhang Li, Rong Xu, Weijiang Zhou, Yanbin Li, Solomon T. Oyakhire, Yecun Wu, Jinwei Xu, Hansen Wang, Zhiao Yu, David T. Boyle, William Huang, Yusheng Ye, Hao Chen, Jiayu Wan, Zhenan Bao, Wah Chiu, Yi Cui. Capturing the swelling of solid-electrolyte interphase in lithium metal batteries. Science, 2022; 375 (6576): 66 DOI: 10.1126/science.abi8703

But one of the hurdles that stand in the way is a silent battle between two of the battery’s parts. The liquid between the battery electrodes, known as the electrolyte, corrodes the surface of the lithium metal anode, coating it in a thin layer of gunk called the solid-electrolyte interphase, or SEI.

Although formation of SEI is believed to be inevitable, researchers hope to stabilize and control the growth of this layer in a way that maximizes the battery’s performance. But until now they have never had a clear picture of what the SEI looks like when it’s saturated with electrolyte, as it would be in a working battery.

Now, researchers from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have made the first high-res images of this layer in its natural plump, squishy state. This advance was made possible by cryogenic electron microscopy, or cryo-EM, a revolutionary technology that reveals details as small as atoms.

The results, they said, suggest that the right electrolyte can minimize the swelling and improve the battery’s performance — giving scientists a potential new way to tweak and improve battery design. They also give researchers a new tool for studying batteries in their everyday working environments.

The team described their work in a paper published in Science today.

“There are no other technologies that can look at this interface between the electrode and the electrolyte with such high resolution,” said Zewen Zhang, a Stanford PhD student who led the experiments with SLAC and Stanford professors Yi Cui and Wah Chiu. “We wanted to prove that we could image the interface at these previously inaccessible scales and see the pristine, native state of these materials as they are in batteries.”

Cui added, “We find this swelling is almost universal. Its effects have not been widely appreciated by the battery research community before, but we found that it has a significant impact on battery performance.”

A ‘thrilling’ tool for energy research

This is the latest in a series of groundbreaking results over the past five years that show cryo-EM, which was developed as a tool for biology, opens “thrilling opportunities” in energy research, the team wrote in a separate review of the field published in July in Accounts of Chemical Research.

Cryo-EM is a form of electron microscopy, which uses electrons rather than light to observe the world of the very small. By flash-freezing their samples into a clear, glassy state, scientists can look at the cellular machines that carry out life’s functions in their natural state and at atomic resolution. Recent improvements in cryo-EM have transformed it into a highly sought method for revealing biological structure in unprecedented detail, and three scientists were awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry for their pioneering contributions to its development.

Inspired by many success stories in biological cryo-EM, Cui teamed up with Chiu to explore whether cryo-EM could be as useful a tool for studying energy-related materials as it was for studying living systems.

One of the first things they looked at was one of those pesky SEI layers on a battery electrode. They published the first atomic-scale images of this layer in 2017, along with images of finger-like growths of lithium wire that can puncture the barrier between the two halves of the battery and cause short circuits or fires.

But to make those images they had to take the battery parts out of the electrolyte, so that the SEI dried into a shrunken state. What it looked like in a wet state inside a working battery was anyone’s guess.

Blotter paper to the rescue

To capture the SEI in its soggy native environment, the researchers came up with a way to make and freeze very thin films of the electrolyte liquid that contained tiny lithium metal wires, which offered a surface for corrosion and the formation of SEI.

First, they inserted a metal grid used for holding cryo-EM samples into a coin cell battery. When they removed it, thin films of electrolyte clung to tiny circular holes within the grid, held in place by surface tension just long enough to perform the remaining steps.

However, those films were still too thick for the electron beam to penetrate and produce sharp images. So Chiu suggested a fix: sopping up the excess liquid with blotter paper. The blotted grid was immediately plunged into liquid nitrogen to freeze the little films into a glassy state that perfectly preserved the SEI. All this took place in a closed system that protected the films from exposure to air.

The results were dramatic, Zhang said. In these wet environments, SEIs absorbed electrolyte and swelled to about twice their previous thickness.

When the team repeated the process with half a dozen other electrolytes of varying chemical compositions, they found that some produced much thicker SEI layers than others — and that the layers that swelled the most were associated with the worst battery performance.

“Right now that connection between SEI swelling behavior and performance applies to lithium metal anodes,” Zhang said, “but we think it should apply as a general rule to other metallic anodes, as well.”

The team also used the super-fine tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) to probe the surfaces of SEI layers and verify that they were more squishy in their wet, swollen state than in their dry state.

In the years since the 2017 paper revealed what cryo-EM can do for energy materials, it’s been used to zoom in on materials for solar cells and cage-like molecules called metal-organic frameworks that can be used in fuel cells, catalysis and gas storage.

As far as next steps, the researchers say they’d like to find a way to image these materials in 3D — and to image them while they’re still inside a working battery, for the most realistic picture yet.

Yi Cui is director of Stanford’s Precourt Institute for Energy and an investigator with the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES) at SLAC. Wah Chiu is co-director of the Stanford-SLAC Cryo-EM Facilities, where the cryo-EM imaging work for this study took place. Part of this work was performed at the Stanford Nano Shared Facilities (SNSF) and Stanford Nanofabrication Facility (SNF). The research was funded by the DOE Office of Science.

We would love to say thanks to the writer of this short article for this remarkable web content

Realistic portraits of squishy layer that’s key to battery performance

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1643295983) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(122) "On Sky the documentary “Being Hikikomori. My life in a room”, twenty year olds who live in the darkness of their lives" ["link"]=> string(147) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/on-sky-the-documentary-being-hikikomori-my-life-in-a-room-twenty-year-olds-who-live-in-the-darkness-of-their-lives/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Sally Scully" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 27 Jan 2022 14:37:11 +0000" ["category"]=> string(54) "ShowsdarknessdocumentaryHikikomoriLifelivelivesoldsSky" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=10159" ["description"]=> string(838) "His Sky Original the documentary “Being Hikikomori. My life in a room“, the story of four twenty-year-olds living in the dark of their lives, broadcast on Saturday 29 January at 9.15pm on Sky Documentaries and also available on demand and streaming on NOW On Sky the documentary “Being Hikikomori. My life in a room” “Being ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4824) "

His Sky Original the documentary “Being Hikikomori. My life in a room“, the story of four twenty-year-olds living in the dark of their lives, broadcast on Saturday 29 January at 9.15pm on Sky Documentaries and also available on demand and streaming on NOW

On Sky the documentary “Being Hikikomori. My life in a room”

Being Hikikomori. My life in a room“, the story of four twenty-year-olds living in the dark of their lives, broadcast on Saturday 29 January at 9.15pm on Sky Documentaries and available on demand and streaming on NOW. To stay on the sidelines, to isolate oneself, cutting out the world and reality. This is the Japanese translation of the term Hikikomori. This word refers in jargon to those children who decide to withdraw from social life for long periods, from a few months up to several years, locking themselves up in their own bedroom, without having any kind of direct contact with the outside world, sometimes not even with their parents.

The documentary follows four Italian boys: Eva, Alessio, Alessandro and Davide who have chosen never to leave their room again. They don’t have a purpose in life. They no longer think about the future. They have no dates on the calendar. They live for the day. Their world is their bedrooms and their computers are their windows. During the day, they sleep. At night, they live, isolating themselves from normal rhythms. Failing to have relationships with real people, but only online relationships where they feel less judged.

“Being Hikikomori. My life in a room” it is the story of 4 in their early twenties, of their hopes, their aspirations, their difficult relationships with their families and their courageous attempts to get out of it. Complicated lives stuck in the darkness of their rooms. The documentary traces a personal narrative path to tell the social-family-character causes of their isolation, the characteristics of their daily life, living in the dark as vampires, not eating, the loss of the perception of time, the addiction to the internet and finally , the hopes of personal rebirth. Space also for other fundamental points of view. That of the parents who will tell their dramatic testimonies and their difficult attempts to create a dialogue with their children, in an attempt to help them get out, and that of Marco Crepaldi, founder of the national association “Hikikomori Italia”, which has been involved in raising awareness for years , support and training on the subject of voluntary youth social isolation.

EH 05 EVA 27124449

Being Hikikomori. My life in a room“is a Sky Original documentary, produced by Sky and Fidelio, written and directed by Michele Bertini Malgarini and Ugo Piva, broadcast on Saturday 29 January at 9.15pm on Sky Documentaries, also available on demand and streaming on NOW. The documentary features presence of graphic animations: a graphic novel entitled “Deep”, divided into four chapters that alternate with the stories of the four boys, born during a series of online and in-person meetings with the 4 protagonists.


Last updated: Thursday 27 January 2022, 13:09

© REPRODUCTION RESERVED

We want to say thanks to the writer of this post for this amazing material

On Sky the documentary “Being Hikikomori. My life in a room”, twenty year olds who live in the darkness of their lives

" } ["summary"]=> string(838) "His Sky Original the documentary “Being Hikikomori. My life in a room“, the story of four twenty-year-olds living in the dark of their lives, broadcast on Saturday 29 January at 9.15pm on Sky Documentaries and also available on demand and streaming on NOW On Sky the documentary “Being Hikikomori. My life in a room” “Being ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4824) "

His Sky Original the documentary “Being Hikikomori. My life in a room“, the story of four twenty-year-olds living in the dark of their lives, broadcast on Saturday 29 January at 9.15pm on Sky Documentaries and also available on demand and streaming on NOW

On Sky the documentary “Being Hikikomori. My life in a room”

Being Hikikomori. My life in a room“, the story of four twenty-year-olds living in the dark of their lives, broadcast on Saturday 29 January at 9.15pm on Sky Documentaries and available on demand and streaming on NOW. To stay on the sidelines, to isolate oneself, cutting out the world and reality. This is the Japanese translation of the term Hikikomori. This word refers in jargon to those children who decide to withdraw from social life for long periods, from a few months up to several years, locking themselves up in their own bedroom, without having any kind of direct contact with the outside world, sometimes not even with their parents.

The documentary follows four Italian boys: Eva, Alessio, Alessandro and Davide who have chosen never to leave their room again. They don’t have a purpose in life. They no longer think about the future. They have no dates on the calendar. They live for the day. Their world is their bedrooms and their computers are their windows. During the day, they sleep. At night, they live, isolating themselves from normal rhythms. Failing to have relationships with real people, but only online relationships where they feel less judged.

“Being Hikikomori. My life in a room” it is the story of 4 in their early twenties, of their hopes, their aspirations, their difficult relationships with their families and their courageous attempts to get out of it. Complicated lives stuck in the darkness of their rooms. The documentary traces a personal narrative path to tell the social-family-character causes of their isolation, the characteristics of their daily life, living in the dark as vampires, not eating, the loss of the perception of time, the addiction to the internet and finally , the hopes of personal rebirth. Space also for other fundamental points of view. That of the parents who will tell their dramatic testimonies and their difficult attempts to create a dialogue with their children, in an attempt to help them get out, and that of Marco Crepaldi, founder of the national association “Hikikomori Italia”, which has been involved in raising awareness for years , support and training on the subject of voluntary youth social isolation.

EH 05 EVA 27124449

Being Hikikomori. My life in a room“is a Sky Original documentary, produced by Sky and Fidelio, written and directed by Michele Bertini Malgarini and Ugo Piva, broadcast on Saturday 29 January at 9.15pm on Sky Documentaries, also available on demand and streaming on NOW. The documentary features presence of graphic animations: a graphic novel entitled “Deep”, divided into four chapters that alternate with the stories of the four boys, born during a series of online and in-person meetings with the 4 protagonists.


Last updated: Thursday 27 January 2022, 13:09

© REPRODUCTION RESERVED

We want to say thanks to the writer of this post for this amazing material

On Sky the documentary “Being Hikikomori. My life in a room”, twenty year olds who live in the darkness of their lives

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1643294231) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(50) "New insights into the timeline of mammal evolution" ["link"]=> string(83) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/new-insights-into-the-timeline-of-mammal-evolution/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Tony Grantly" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 27 Jan 2022 13:49:26 +0000" ["category"]=> string(49) "Health And ScienceEvolutioninsightsmammaltimeline" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=10154" ["description"]=> string(683) "Journal Reference: Sandra Álvarez-Carretero, Asif U. Tamuri, Matteo Battini, Fabrícia F. Nascimento, Emily Carlisle, Robert J. Asher, Ziheng Yang, Philip C. J. Donoghue, Mario dos Reis. A Species-Level Timeline of Mammal Evolution Integrating Phylogenomic Data. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04341-1 The research describes a new and fast computational approach to obtain precisely dated evolutionary trees, known ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5807) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Sandra Álvarez-Carretero, Asif U. Tamuri, Matteo Battini, Fabrícia F. Nascimento, Emily Carlisle, Robert J. Asher, Ziheng Yang, Philip C. J. Donoghue, Mario dos Reis. A Species-Level Timeline of Mammal Evolution Integrating Phylogenomic Data. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04341-1

The research describes a new and fast computational approach to obtain precisely dated evolutionary trees, known as ‘timetrees’. The authors used the novel method to analyse a mammal genomic dataset and answer a long-standing question around whether modern placental mammal groups originated before or after the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction, which wiped out over 70 per cent of all species, including all dinosaurs.

The findings confirm the ancestors of modern placental mammal groups postdate the K-Pg extinction that occurred 66 million years ago, settling a controversy around the origins of modern mammals. Placental mammals are the most diverse group of living mammals, and include groups such as primates, rodents, cetaceans, carnivorans, chiropterans (bats) as well as humans.

The research team was led by Dr Mario dos Reis (Queen Mary University of London) and Professor Phil Donoghue (University of Bristol), and included scientists from Queen Mary, University of Bristol, UCL, Imperial College London, and the University of Cambridge.

Dr Sandra Álvarez-Carretero, lead author of the paper from UCL (then at Queen Mary), says: “By integrating complete genomes in the analysis and the necessary fossil information, we were able to reduce uncertainties and obtain a precise evolutionary timeline. Did modern mammal groups co-exist with the dinosaurs, or did they originate after the mass extinction? We now have a definite answer.”

“The timeline of mammal evolution is perhaps one of the most contentious topics in evolutionary biology. Early studies provided origination estimates for modern placental groups deep in the Cretaceous, in the dinosaur era. The past two decades had seen studies moving back and forth between post- and pre-K-Pg diversification scenarios. Our precise timeline settles the issue.” adds Prof Donoghue, co-senior author of the paper.

With worldwide sequencing projects now producing hundreds to thousands of genome sequences, and with imminent plans to sequence more than a million species, evolutionary biologists will soon have a wealth of information at their hands. However, current methods to analyse the vast genomic datasets available and create evolutionary timelines are inefficient and computationally expensive.

“Inferring evolutionary timelines is a fundamental goal of biology. However, state-of-the-art methods rely on using computers to simulate evolutionary timelines and assess the most plausible ones. In our case, this was difficult due to the gigantic dataset analysed, involving genetic data from almost 5,000 mammal species and 72 complete genomes,” Dr dos Reis says.

In this study, the researchers developed a new, fast Bayesian approach to analyse large numbers of genome sequences, whilst also accounting for uncertainties within the data. “We solved the computational hurdles by dividing the analysis in sub-steps: first simulating timelines using the 72 genomes and then using the results to guide the simulations on the remaining species. Using genomes reduces uncertainty because it allows rejection of unplausible timelines from the simulations,” says Dr dos Reis.

“Our data processing pipeline sourced as much genomic data for as many mammal species as possible. This was challenging because genetic databases contain inaccuracies and we had to develop a strategy to identify poor quality samples or mislabelled data that had to be removed,” adds Dr Asif Tamuri, co-lead author of the paper from UCL, who was responsible for assembling the mammal genomic dataset.

Using their novel approach, the team were able to reduce computation time for this complex analysis from decades to months. “If we had tried to analyse this large mammal dataset in a supercomputer without using the Bayesian method we have developed, we would have had to wait decades to infer the mammal timetree. Just imagine how long this analysis could take if we were to use our own PCs,” says Dr Álvarez-Carretero. “In addition, we managed to reduce computation time by a factor of 100. This new approach not only allows the analysis of genomic datasets, but also, by being more efficient, substantially reduces the CO2 emissions released due to computing,” Dr Álvarez-Carretero continues.

The method developed in the study could be used to tackle other contentious evolutionary timelines that require analysis of large datasets. By integrating the novel Bayesian approach with the forthcoming genomes from the Darwin Tree of Life and Earth BioGenome projects, the idea of estimating a reliable evolutionary timescale for the Tree of Life now seems within reach.

The research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.

We would like to say thanks to the writer of this post for this outstanding web content

New insights into the timeline of mammal evolution

" } ["summary"]=> string(683) "Journal Reference: Sandra Álvarez-Carretero, Asif U. Tamuri, Matteo Battini, Fabrícia F. Nascimento, Emily Carlisle, Robert J. Asher, Ziheng Yang, Philip C. J. Donoghue, Mario dos Reis. A Species-Level Timeline of Mammal Evolution Integrating Phylogenomic Data. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04341-1 The research describes a new and fast computational approach to obtain precisely dated evolutionary trees, known ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(5807) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Sandra Álvarez-Carretero, Asif U. Tamuri, Matteo Battini, Fabrícia F. Nascimento, Emily Carlisle, Robert J. Asher, Ziheng Yang, Philip C. J. Donoghue, Mario dos Reis. A Species-Level Timeline of Mammal Evolution Integrating Phylogenomic Data. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04341-1

The research describes a new and fast computational approach to obtain precisely dated evolutionary trees, known as ‘timetrees’. The authors used the novel method to analyse a mammal genomic dataset and answer a long-standing question around whether modern placental mammal groups originated before or after the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction, which wiped out over 70 per cent of all species, including all dinosaurs.

The findings confirm the ancestors of modern placental mammal groups postdate the K-Pg extinction that occurred 66 million years ago, settling a controversy around the origins of modern mammals. Placental mammals are the most diverse group of living mammals, and include groups such as primates, rodents, cetaceans, carnivorans, chiropterans (bats) as well as humans.

The research team was led by Dr Mario dos Reis (Queen Mary University of London) and Professor Phil Donoghue (University of Bristol), and included scientists from Queen Mary, University of Bristol, UCL, Imperial College London, and the University of Cambridge.

Dr Sandra Álvarez-Carretero, lead author of the paper from UCL (then at Queen Mary), says: “By integrating complete genomes in the analysis and the necessary fossil information, we were able to reduce uncertainties and obtain a precise evolutionary timeline. Did modern mammal groups co-exist with the dinosaurs, or did they originate after the mass extinction? We now have a definite answer.”

“The timeline of mammal evolution is perhaps one of the most contentious topics in evolutionary biology. Early studies provided origination estimates for modern placental groups deep in the Cretaceous, in the dinosaur era. The past two decades had seen studies moving back and forth between post- and pre-K-Pg diversification scenarios. Our precise timeline settles the issue.” adds Prof Donoghue, co-senior author of the paper.

With worldwide sequencing projects now producing hundreds to thousands of genome sequences, and with imminent plans to sequence more than a million species, evolutionary biologists will soon have a wealth of information at their hands. However, current methods to analyse the vast genomic datasets available and create evolutionary timelines are inefficient and computationally expensive.

“Inferring evolutionary timelines is a fundamental goal of biology. However, state-of-the-art methods rely on using computers to simulate evolutionary timelines and assess the most plausible ones. In our case, this was difficult due to the gigantic dataset analysed, involving genetic data from almost 5,000 mammal species and 72 complete genomes,” Dr dos Reis says.

In this study, the researchers developed a new, fast Bayesian approach to analyse large numbers of genome sequences, whilst also accounting for uncertainties within the data. “We solved the computational hurdles by dividing the analysis in sub-steps: first simulating timelines using the 72 genomes and then using the results to guide the simulations on the remaining species. Using genomes reduces uncertainty because it allows rejection of unplausible timelines from the simulations,” says Dr dos Reis.

“Our data processing pipeline sourced as much genomic data for as many mammal species as possible. This was challenging because genetic databases contain inaccuracies and we had to develop a strategy to identify poor quality samples or mislabelled data that had to be removed,” adds Dr Asif Tamuri, co-lead author of the paper from UCL, who was responsible for assembling the mammal genomic dataset.

Using their novel approach, the team were able to reduce computation time for this complex analysis from decades to months. “If we had tried to analyse this large mammal dataset in a supercomputer without using the Bayesian method we have developed, we would have had to wait decades to infer the mammal timetree. Just imagine how long this analysis could take if we were to use our own PCs,” says Dr Álvarez-Carretero. “In addition, we managed to reduce computation time by a factor of 100. This new approach not only allows the analysis of genomic datasets, but also, by being more efficient, substantially reduces the CO2 emissions released due to computing,” Dr Álvarez-Carretero continues.

The method developed in the study could be used to tackle other contentious evolutionary timelines that require analysis of large datasets. By integrating the novel Bayesian approach with the forthcoming genomes from the Darwin Tree of Life and Earth BioGenome projects, the idea of estimating a reliable evolutionary timescale for the Tree of Life now seems within reach.

The research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.

We would like to say thanks to the writer of this post for this outstanding web content

New insights into the timeline of mammal evolution

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