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The post Kratom for Opioid Withdrawal appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(19357) "

Originally Posted On: Kratom for Opioid Withdrawal

 


Kratom for Opioid Withdrawal

Opioid withdrawal is a set of symptoms caused by the abrupt cessation or reduction of opioid use after a period of heavy and prolonged use. Opioid withdrawal can last anywhere between a few days to a few weeks and cause many opioid relapses. Although many clinically proven treatment options are available to overcome opioid withdrawals, surveys indicate that many individuals don’t have access to the appropriate care they need. As a result, more and more individuals are opting for natural approaches.

One of the most controversial approaches for treating opioid withdrawal is kratom, a herb from the other side of the world. Kratom is classified as an opioid as it works on the same brain mechanisms and circuits as other opioids. While the FDA does not approve kratom for any medical use, the first indication of its use to treat OUD date back to 1836.

In August 2016, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) attempted to designate kratom as a Schedule I substance due to its high potential for misuse and dependence. However, this attempt was unsuccessful due to public backlash. Kratom remains legal in America except for six U.S. states. And for the time being, the DEA has designated kratom as a “medication of concern.”

What Is Kratom?

Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a tropical tree indigenous to Southeast Asia and certain parts of Africa, with a long history of medical and ceremonial use. Kratom is known by many other names, including Ketum, Biak, Thang, Kakuam, and Thom. In the United States, kratom is typically sold as a dietary or nutritional supplement. And is readily available via the internet as dried or crushed leaves, capsules, tablets, liquids, and resin.

The two main compounds in kratom leaves (mitragynine and 7-α-hydroxy mitragynine) interact with opioid receptors in the brain to induce stimulating effects at low doses and sedative effects at high doses. Hence, kratom is becoming an increasingly popular alternative therapy in the United States for pain relief, digestive ailments, and opioid withdrawals.

There are currently 25 compounds identified in kratom, but since the two main compounds of kratom interact with opioid receptors in the brain, the FDA classified kratom as an opioid. While kratom produces opioid-like effects, it also has the same potential for producing tolerance, dependence, and addiction.

Kratom Effects & Uses

Kratom has a wide range of effects depending on the dosage consumed. Kratom effects activate within 5-15 minutes and last for two to five hours after being consumed. The stimulant effects of kratom at low doses can be experienced in 10 minutes and can last anywhere from 60 to 90 minutes. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), kratom effects include:

Other anecdotal uses of kratom also include:

None of these uses, however, have been clinically tested or confirmed to be safe or beneficial. They are not endorsed treatments by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration(FDA) or any other medical board.

Kratom Withdrawal – Is It the Same as Opioid Withdrawal?

Since kratom and opioids are known to generate similar effects, kratom withdrawal symptoms have also been compared to opioid withdrawal, although there are some differences. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), kratom is considered to work on opioid receptors in the brain similarly to morphine. However, kratom is regarded to be 13 times stronger than morphine.

Prolonged and regular use of kratom can cause tolerance, dependence, and addiction. Kratom dependence can occur in as little as six months, and the DEA reports that the following symptoms may be observed during kratom withdrawal (similar to opioid withdrawal).

In addition, psychotic symptoms such as hallucinations, delusions, disorientation, and seizures may also occur with severe kratom dependence. When experiencing kratom withdrawal, individuals are highly advised to seek assistance from a professional detox facility, as withdrawals can be incredibly uncomfortable and possibly life-threatening.

How Effective Is Kratom for Opioid Withdrawal?

It’s unclear how effective kratom is at relieving opioid withdrawal symptoms. But since kratom works on some of the same opioid receptors as traditional opioids, it does seem plausible that kratom could help reduce withdrawal symptoms. However, the lack of clinical studies and research on kratom’s long-term health effects and its potential as a medication for opioid use disorder and withdrawals opens up the possibility that kratom can lead towards trading one chemical dependence for another. In addition, the lack of regulatory oversight, production standard, and the sale of tainted kratom products contaminated with potentially poisonous and infectious chemicals pose a threat to all who consume kratom.

Despite the lack of medical and scientific evidence, many individuals utilize kratom to treat opioid withdrawal. It’s worth noting that kratom is a considerably weaker opioid receptor stimulator than traditional opioids. Hence someone dependent on opioids will need to use a substantial dose of kratom to alleviate withdrawal symptoms, which could be risky, as long-term consequences are not fully understood.

The safety and effectiveness of kratom have yet to be determined in a clinical setting. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expressed major concerns about the toxicity and death associated with its usage. According to the FDA, there is no scientific evidence to support the use of kratom for medical purposes. Furthermore, the FDA advises against using kratom as a substitute for prescription opioids, even if it’s to treat opioid withdrawal symptoms.

Health Risks Associated with Kratom

It’s possible that kratom, like many herbal products, could be tainted with illegal and poisonous substances. Hence consumers should avoid purchasing unfamiliar medical items over the internet. When combined with other substances, the effects of kratom are unknown and potentially harmful. Mixing prescription opioids, over-the-counter medicines, or even alcohol with kratom has been found to cause substantial negative effects.

As of April 2018, more than 130 people had contracted Salmonella after consuming kratom in 38 states. Salmonella poisoning can be lethal, and the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have linked kratom strains tainted with Salmonella to more than 199 cases in 41 states. Salmonella contamination has no visible signs, so avoiding products that may contain it is the best way to avoid becoming ill.

Kratom is most often sold as a dietary supplement in the United States. Therefore, it’s important to be aware of the following information about such products before using them:

Before taking kratom or any other herbal supplement, consult your doctor to ensure that the product is safe and appropriate for you.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Kratom for Opioid Withdrawal appeared first on Syndication Site.

" } ["summary"]=> string(201) "

The post Kratom for Opioid Withdrawal appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(19357) "

Originally Posted On: Kratom for Opioid Withdrawal

 


Kratom for Opioid Withdrawal

Opioid withdrawal is a set of symptoms caused by the abrupt cessation or reduction of opioid use after a period of heavy and prolonged use. Opioid withdrawal can last anywhere between a few days to a few weeks and cause many opioid relapses. Although many clinically proven treatment options are available to overcome opioid withdrawals, surveys indicate that many individuals don’t have access to the appropriate care they need. As a result, more and more individuals are opting for natural approaches.

One of the most controversial approaches for treating opioid withdrawal is kratom, a herb from the other side of the world. Kratom is classified as an opioid as it works on the same brain mechanisms and circuits as other opioids. While the FDA does not approve kratom for any medical use, the first indication of its use to treat OUD date back to 1836.

In August 2016, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) attempted to designate kratom as a Schedule I substance due to its high potential for misuse and dependence. However, this attempt was unsuccessful due to public backlash. Kratom remains legal in America except for six U.S. states. And for the time being, the DEA has designated kratom as a “medication of concern.”

What Is Kratom?

Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a tropical tree indigenous to Southeast Asia and certain parts of Africa, with a long history of medical and ceremonial use. Kratom is known by many other names, including Ketum, Biak, Thang, Kakuam, and Thom. In the United States, kratom is typically sold as a dietary or nutritional supplement. And is readily available via the internet as dried or crushed leaves, capsules, tablets, liquids, and resin.

The two main compounds in kratom leaves (mitragynine and 7-α-hydroxy mitragynine) interact with opioid receptors in the brain to induce stimulating effects at low doses and sedative effects at high doses. Hence, kratom is becoming an increasingly popular alternative therapy in the United States for pain relief, digestive ailments, and opioid withdrawals.

There are currently 25 compounds identified in kratom, but since the two main compounds of kratom interact with opioid receptors in the brain, the FDA classified kratom as an opioid. While kratom produces opioid-like effects, it also has the same potential for producing tolerance, dependence, and addiction.

Kratom Effects & Uses

Kratom has a wide range of effects depending on the dosage consumed. Kratom effects activate within 5-15 minutes and last for two to five hours after being consumed. The stimulant effects of kratom at low doses can be experienced in 10 minutes and can last anywhere from 60 to 90 minutes. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), kratom effects include:

Other anecdotal uses of kratom also include:

None of these uses, however, have been clinically tested or confirmed to be safe or beneficial. They are not endorsed treatments by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration(FDA) or any other medical board.

Kratom Withdrawal – Is It the Same as Opioid Withdrawal?

Since kratom and opioids are known to generate similar effects, kratom withdrawal symptoms have also been compared to opioid withdrawal, although there are some differences. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), kratom is considered to work on opioid receptors in the brain similarly to morphine. However, kratom is regarded to be 13 times stronger than morphine.

Prolonged and regular use of kratom can cause tolerance, dependence, and addiction. Kratom dependence can occur in as little as six months, and the DEA reports that the following symptoms may be observed during kratom withdrawal (similar to opioid withdrawal).

In addition, psychotic symptoms such as hallucinations, delusions, disorientation, and seizures may also occur with severe kratom dependence. When experiencing kratom withdrawal, individuals are highly advised to seek assistance from a professional detox facility, as withdrawals can be incredibly uncomfortable and possibly life-threatening.

How Effective Is Kratom for Opioid Withdrawal?

It’s unclear how effective kratom is at relieving opioid withdrawal symptoms. But since kratom works on some of the same opioid receptors as traditional opioids, it does seem plausible that kratom could help reduce withdrawal symptoms. However, the lack of clinical studies and research on kratom’s long-term health effects and its potential as a medication for opioid use disorder and withdrawals opens up the possibility that kratom can lead towards trading one chemical dependence for another. In addition, the lack of regulatory oversight, production standard, and the sale of tainted kratom products contaminated with potentially poisonous and infectious chemicals pose a threat to all who consume kratom.

Despite the lack of medical and scientific evidence, many individuals utilize kratom to treat opioid withdrawal. It’s worth noting that kratom is a considerably weaker opioid receptor stimulator than traditional opioids. Hence someone dependent on opioids will need to use a substantial dose of kratom to alleviate withdrawal symptoms, which could be risky, as long-term consequences are not fully understood.

The safety and effectiveness of kratom have yet to be determined in a clinical setting. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expressed major concerns about the toxicity and death associated with its usage. According to the FDA, there is no scientific evidence to support the use of kratom for medical purposes. Furthermore, the FDA advises against using kratom as a substitute for prescription opioids, even if it’s to treat opioid withdrawal symptoms.

Health Risks Associated with Kratom

It’s possible that kratom, like many herbal products, could be tainted with illegal and poisonous substances. Hence consumers should avoid purchasing unfamiliar medical items over the internet. When combined with other substances, the effects of kratom are unknown and potentially harmful. Mixing prescription opioids, over-the-counter medicines, or even alcohol with kratom has been found to cause substantial negative effects.

As of April 2018, more than 130 people had contracted Salmonella after consuming kratom in 38 states. Salmonella poisoning can be lethal, and the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have linked kratom strains tainted with Salmonella to more than 199 cases in 41 states. Salmonella contamination has no visible signs, so avoiding products that may contain it is the best way to avoid becoming ill.

Kratom is most often sold as a dietary supplement in the United States. Therefore, it’s important to be aware of the following information about such products before using them:

Before taking kratom or any other herbal supplement, consult your doctor to ensure that the product is safe and appropriate for you.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Kratom for Opioid Withdrawal appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1636991758) } [1]=> array(10) { ["title"]=> string(43) "How Long Does Suboxone Stay In Your System?" ["link"]=> string(71) "https://syndication.site/content-feed/how-long-suboxone-stay-in-system/" ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 15 Nov 2021 15:08:38 +0000" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(16) "Syndication Site" } ["guid"]=> string(71) "https://syndication.site/content-feed/how-long-suboxone-stay-in-system/" ["description"]=> string(223) "

The post How Long Does Suboxone Stay In Your System? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(17284) "

Originally Posted On: How Long Does Suboxone Stay In Your System?

 

How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your System?

The driving force behind the increase in substance misuse-related ER visits and overdose deaths in the U.S. are reported to be caused by synthetic opioids. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 70% of overdose deaths in 2019 involved an opioid. As a result of this growing concern, a wide range of treatment options have been put in place to curb the rising rates of opioid use disorders (OUD) in the United States.

One such increasingly utilized treatment in combating the opioid crisis is opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) or medications for use disorder (MOUD). MOUD treatment utilizes various medications in conjunction with counseling and behavioral therapies to provide a “whole-person” approach to treatment to minimize the risk of relapse and maintain long-term sobriety. MOUD programs are clinically driven and are tailored to meet each person’s unique needs. And one of the primary medications used in MOUD treatment is Suboxone.

What Is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a prescription medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat opioid use disorder (OUD). Suboxone is a schedule III controlled substance, available as tablets and sublingual film strips and contains two main ingredients, namely:

The buprenorphine and naloxone combination works together to block withdrawal symptoms associated with opioid addiction. Buprenorphine decreases withdrawal symptoms and opioid cravings without fully activating the opioid receptors, while naloxone works in the background as a deterrent to reduce relapses and overdoses during recovery.

Congress passed the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000, allowing competent physicians to prescribe narcotic medications (Schedules III through V) to treat OUD. This legislation ushered in a major paradigm shift, allowing opioid maintenance treatment to be delivered outside of methadone clinics. Nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other types of medical professionals can now prescribe Suboxone.

How Long Does it Take Suboxone to Work?

Suboxone begins to work within 20-60 minutes of the first dose. The medication reaches peak level within two to three hours and blocks opioid receptors for at least 24 hours. However, this can differ from person to person based on factors such as:

For Suboxone to work effectively, the first dose must be taken during the acute withdrawal stage. Taking Suboxone before this stage may result in precipitated withdrawal. Precipitated withdrawal is a severe form of withdrawal caused by the abrupt removal of opioids from the receptors. This reaction triggers a sudden onset of withdrawal rather than a gradual one. Precipitated withdrawal is extremely painful and can increase the likelihood of a relapse. Thus, it is important to work closely with a Suboxone doctor to prevent such risks.

How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your System?

Various factors influence the duration in which Suboxone remains in your body. And one such determining factor is Suboxone’s half-life. A half-life refers to the amount of time required for half of a substance to leave the body completely.

The buprenorphine in Suboxone has a long half-life of 24-42 hours. Since it takes about five half-lives for a substance to completely leave the body, it can take around seven to nine days for buprenorphine to leave the body completely. However, depending on the duration of treatment, traces of buprenorphine can remain detectable in the body for longer.

Naloxone, the other ingredient in Suboxone, has a half-life of around two to 12 hours and can stay in the body for up to 60 hours. But since naloxone isn’t a misused substance, doctors do not generally screen for its presence.

Factors That Influence How Long Suboxone Stay in Your System

It generally takes seven to nine days for Suboxone to leave a person’s system completely. However, this can differ from one person to another based on various factors.

Some of the factors that influence how long Suboxone stays in the system include:

How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your System - Eleanor Health

How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your Urine?

When the liver metabolizes buprenorphine, it’s broken down into metabolites called norbuprenorphine. Norbuprenorphine has a much longer half-life of up to 150 hours and is primarily excreted through urine. As such, traces of buprenorphine can remain detectable in urine tests for up to two weeks.

How Long Is Suboxone Detected in Saliva, Blood, and Hair?

Suboxone s detectable in saliva, blood, and hair for varying lengths of time. For individuals with good liver health, Suboxone is detectable in drug tests as follows:

Many individuals worry about testing positive during a drug test, but in reality, such tests generally detect the presence of opioids through morphine, as opioids, including heroin, metabolize into morphine. To detect Suboxone in your body, you may require specialized testing.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, and Washington.

The post How Long Does Suboxone Stay In Your System? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" } ["summary"]=> string(223) "

The post How Long Does Suboxone Stay In Your System? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(17284) "

Originally Posted On: How Long Does Suboxone Stay In Your System?

 

How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your System?

The driving force behind the increase in substance misuse-related ER visits and overdose deaths in the U.S. are reported to be caused by synthetic opioids. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 70% of overdose deaths in 2019 involved an opioid. As a result of this growing concern, a wide range of treatment options have been put in place to curb the rising rates of opioid use disorders (OUD) in the United States.

One such increasingly utilized treatment in combating the opioid crisis is opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) or medications for use disorder (MOUD). MOUD treatment utilizes various medications in conjunction with counseling and behavioral therapies to provide a “whole-person” approach to treatment to minimize the risk of relapse and maintain long-term sobriety. MOUD programs are clinically driven and are tailored to meet each person’s unique needs. And one of the primary medications used in MOUD treatment is Suboxone.

What Is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a prescription medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat opioid use disorder (OUD). Suboxone is a schedule III controlled substance, available as tablets and sublingual film strips and contains two main ingredients, namely:

The buprenorphine and naloxone combination works together to block withdrawal symptoms associated with opioid addiction. Buprenorphine decreases withdrawal symptoms and opioid cravings without fully activating the opioid receptors, while naloxone works in the background as a deterrent to reduce relapses and overdoses during recovery.

Congress passed the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000, allowing competent physicians to prescribe narcotic medications (Schedules III through V) to treat OUD. This legislation ushered in a major paradigm shift, allowing opioid maintenance treatment to be delivered outside of methadone clinics. Nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other types of medical professionals can now prescribe Suboxone.

How Long Does it Take Suboxone to Work?

Suboxone begins to work within 20-60 minutes of the first dose. The medication reaches peak level within two to three hours and blocks opioid receptors for at least 24 hours. However, this can differ from person to person based on factors such as:

For Suboxone to work effectively, the first dose must be taken during the acute withdrawal stage. Taking Suboxone before this stage may result in precipitated withdrawal. Precipitated withdrawal is a severe form of withdrawal caused by the abrupt removal of opioids from the receptors. This reaction triggers a sudden onset of withdrawal rather than a gradual one. Precipitated withdrawal is extremely painful and can increase the likelihood of a relapse. Thus, it is important to work closely with a Suboxone doctor to prevent such risks.

How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your System?

Various factors influence the duration in which Suboxone remains in your body. And one such determining factor is Suboxone’s half-life. A half-life refers to the amount of time required for half of a substance to leave the body completely.

The buprenorphine in Suboxone has a long half-life of 24-42 hours. Since it takes about five half-lives for a substance to completely leave the body, it can take around seven to nine days for buprenorphine to leave the body completely. However, depending on the duration of treatment, traces of buprenorphine can remain detectable in the body for longer.

Naloxone, the other ingredient in Suboxone, has a half-life of around two to 12 hours and can stay in the body for up to 60 hours. But since naloxone isn’t a misused substance, doctors do not generally screen for its presence.

Factors That Influence How Long Suboxone Stay in Your System

It generally takes seven to nine days for Suboxone to leave a person’s system completely. However, this can differ from one person to another based on various factors.

Some of the factors that influence how long Suboxone stays in the system include:

How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your System - Eleanor Health

How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your Urine?

When the liver metabolizes buprenorphine, it’s broken down into metabolites called norbuprenorphine. Norbuprenorphine has a much longer half-life of up to 150 hours and is primarily excreted through urine. As such, traces of buprenorphine can remain detectable in urine tests for up to two weeks.

How Long Is Suboxone Detected in Saliva, Blood, and Hair?

Suboxone s detectable in saliva, blood, and hair for varying lengths of time. For individuals with good liver health, Suboxone is detectable in drug tests as follows:

Many individuals worry about testing positive during a drug test, but in reality, such tests generally detect the presence of opioids through morphine, as opioids, including heroin, metabolize into morphine. To detect Suboxone in your body, you may require specialized testing.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, and Washington.

The post How Long Does Suboxone Stay In Your System? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1636988918) } [2]=> array(10) { ["title"]=> string(33) "How Long is Methadone Withdrawal?" ["link"]=> string(71) "https://syndication.site/content-feed/how-long-is-methadone-withdrawal/" ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 12 Nov 2021 16:27:54 +0000" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(16) "Syndication Site" } ["guid"]=> string(71) "https://syndication.site/content-feed/how-long-is-methadone-withdrawal/" ["description"]=> string(213) "

The post How Long is Methadone Withdrawal? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(16083) "

Originally Posted On: How Long is Methadone Withdrawal?

Overdose is the leading cause of unintentional death in the U.S. However, this issue has only worsened after the COVID-19 outbreak. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 81,230 people died of an overdose in the U.S. from June 2019 to May 2020, the highest ever recorded in 12 months. And opioid use disorder (OUD) appears to be the main cause behind such overdose deaths.

The medical community has successfully identified and initiated various measures and treatment options to help fight the opioid crisis. And one of such treatment options is medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD), such as methadone. Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has shown considerable success and is increasingly used to help individuals struggling with an OUD live healthier sober lives. However, methadone’s risk of causing dependence and withdrawals has raised serious concerns regarding its efficacy as a treatment option.

What Is Methadone?

Methadone, sold under brand names Methadose and Dolophine, is a prescription medication used to treat moderate to severe pain and opioid use disorder. Methadone was first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat OUD in the late 1970s. Methadone is a synthetic opioid medication that functions by interacting with opioid receptors in the brain to reduce symptoms of opioid withdrawals. MMT is most effective when used in conjunction with behavioral therapies and counseling.

Methadone is a highly regulated medication that can only be prescribed through a methadone clinic. It is regarded as the gold standard for opioid dependence treatment and is included in the World Health Organization’s list of essential medicines.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), methadone is a relatively safe and effective medication when used as prescribed. However, since it’s still an opioid, prolonged use increases the risk of tolerance, dependence, and addiction to the medication.

Side Effects of Methadone Withdrawal

The addictive nature of methadone may cause individuals to experience withdrawal symptoms upon quitting the medication abruptly. After prolonged use, the sudden absence of methadone triggers uncomfortable reactions while the body relearns to function without the medication again.

Symptoms of methadone withdrawal are similar to withdrawal from other opioids such as heroin and morphine but are usually moderate and flu-like. Some of the most common symptoms of methadone withdrawal are:

Methadone withdrawal can be a painful experience. Hence, individuals receiving MMT are gradually weaned off the medication at the end of their MOUD treatment under the guidance and supervision of their healthcare provider.

Methadone Withdrawal Timeline

Methadone withdrawal symptoms usually appear within 24-36 hours after the last dose due to the long-acting nature of this medication. However, some may not even experience withdrawal symptoms until several days after the last dose. Symptoms of methadone withdrawals are most distressing during the first seven to 10 days of detox.

Methadone withdrawal typically follows the below timeline:

How Long Is Methadone Withdrawal?

Methadone withdrawal is a slow and relatively long process. Withdrawal symptoms begin within 24-36 hours, peak within 7-10 days, and last anywhere between 2-3 weeks to up to six months. However, the withdrawal duration and severity can vary from person to person based on factors such as:

A person who uses methadone as prescribed for three months will generally go through a shorter withdrawal process than someone who has been using methadone for a year or misusing methadone in large doses.

Methadone Withdrawal Cold Turkey – Is It Safe?

Quitting methadone cold turkey is not life-threatening in most instances, but it’s not recommended. Methadone can cause severe withdrawal symptoms and hinder the recovery process. One of the biggest risks of quitting methadone cold turkey is its potential to cause a relapse. It can also trigger health complications that may require immediate medical attention, such as dehydration and electrolyte imbalance from vomiting, diarrhea, and aspiration from breathing stomach contents into the lungs. Thus, people are advised not to quit methadone cold-turkey and seek a healthcare provider’s services to wean off the medication safely instead.

How to Manage Methadone Withdrawal?

The safest and most efficient way to detox from methadone is to undergo a tapering-down program under the supervision of a medical professional. A tapering-down program involves reducing methadone doses over a certain period rather than quitting it cold-turkey to manage methadone withdrawals. Methadone clinics generally provide people with such services at the end of treatment to ensure that they wean off the medication safely and successfully.

Some doctors may utilize certain medications during detox to ease symptoms of methadone withdrawal and shorten the duration of detox. Medical detox can include the use of medications such as Zofran, clonidine, and baclofen to mitigate anxiety, agitation, high blood pressure, nausea, and muscle pains.

During the weaning process if you decide you would like to continue being on opioid replacement therapy such as suboxone, this can be done if planned ahead with your medical provider

Although withdrawal from any addictive substance can be difficult, the long-term benefit of using methadone for opioid dependence treatment far outweighs its risks.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, and Washington.

The post How Long is Methadone Withdrawal? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" } ["summary"]=> string(213) "

The post How Long is Methadone Withdrawal? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(16083) "

Originally Posted On: How Long is Methadone Withdrawal?

Overdose is the leading cause of unintentional death in the U.S. However, this issue has only worsened after the COVID-19 outbreak. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 81,230 people died of an overdose in the U.S. from June 2019 to May 2020, the highest ever recorded in 12 months. And opioid use disorder (OUD) appears to be the main cause behind such overdose deaths.

The medical community has successfully identified and initiated various measures and treatment options to help fight the opioid crisis. And one of such treatment options is medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD), such as methadone. Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has shown considerable success and is increasingly used to help individuals struggling with an OUD live healthier sober lives. However, methadone’s risk of causing dependence and withdrawals has raised serious concerns regarding its efficacy as a treatment option.

What Is Methadone?

Methadone, sold under brand names Methadose and Dolophine, is a prescription medication used to treat moderate to severe pain and opioid use disorder. Methadone was first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat OUD in the late 1970s. Methadone is a synthetic opioid medication that functions by interacting with opioid receptors in the brain to reduce symptoms of opioid withdrawals. MMT is most effective when used in conjunction with behavioral therapies and counseling.

Methadone is a highly regulated medication that can only be prescribed through a methadone clinic. It is regarded as the gold standard for opioid dependence treatment and is included in the World Health Organization’s list of essential medicines.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), methadone is a relatively safe and effective medication when used as prescribed. However, since it’s still an opioid, prolonged use increases the risk of tolerance, dependence, and addiction to the medication.

Side Effects of Methadone Withdrawal

The addictive nature of methadone may cause individuals to experience withdrawal symptoms upon quitting the medication abruptly. After prolonged use, the sudden absence of methadone triggers uncomfortable reactions while the body relearns to function without the medication again.

Symptoms of methadone withdrawal are similar to withdrawal from other opioids such as heroin and morphine but are usually moderate and flu-like. Some of the most common symptoms of methadone withdrawal are:

Methadone withdrawal can be a painful experience. Hence, individuals receiving MMT are gradually weaned off the medication at the end of their MOUD treatment under the guidance and supervision of their healthcare provider.

Methadone Withdrawal Timeline

Methadone withdrawal symptoms usually appear within 24-36 hours after the last dose due to the long-acting nature of this medication. However, some may not even experience withdrawal symptoms until several days after the last dose. Symptoms of methadone withdrawals are most distressing during the first seven to 10 days of detox.

Methadone withdrawal typically follows the below timeline:

How Long Is Methadone Withdrawal?

Methadone withdrawal is a slow and relatively long process. Withdrawal symptoms begin within 24-36 hours, peak within 7-10 days, and last anywhere between 2-3 weeks to up to six months. However, the withdrawal duration and severity can vary from person to person based on factors such as:

A person who uses methadone as prescribed for three months will generally go through a shorter withdrawal process than someone who has been using methadone for a year or misusing methadone in large doses.

Methadone Withdrawal Cold Turkey – Is It Safe?

Quitting methadone cold turkey is not life-threatening in most instances, but it’s not recommended. Methadone can cause severe withdrawal symptoms and hinder the recovery process. One of the biggest risks of quitting methadone cold turkey is its potential to cause a relapse. It can also trigger health complications that may require immediate medical attention, such as dehydration and electrolyte imbalance from vomiting, diarrhea, and aspiration from breathing stomach contents into the lungs. Thus, people are advised not to quit methadone cold-turkey and seek a healthcare provider’s services to wean off the medication safely instead.

How to Manage Methadone Withdrawal?

The safest and most efficient way to detox from methadone is to undergo a tapering-down program under the supervision of a medical professional. A tapering-down program involves reducing methadone doses over a certain period rather than quitting it cold-turkey to manage methadone withdrawals. Methadone clinics generally provide people with such services at the end of treatment to ensure that they wean off the medication safely and successfully.

Some doctors may utilize certain medications during detox to ease symptoms of methadone withdrawal and shorten the duration of detox. Medical detox can include the use of medications such as Zofran, clonidine, and baclofen to mitigate anxiety, agitation, high blood pressure, nausea, and muscle pains.

During the weaning process if you decide you would like to continue being on opioid replacement therapy such as suboxone, this can be done if planned ahead with your medical provider

Although withdrawal from any addictive substance can be difficult, the long-term benefit of using methadone for opioid dependence treatment far outweighs its risks.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, and Washington.

The post How Long is Methadone Withdrawal? appeared first on Syndication Site.

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The post Methadone Clinic appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(18141) "

Originally Posted On: Methadone Clinic

Opioid misuse and dependence remain a major public health crisis in the United States. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), around 9.7 million Americans aged 12 and older misused prescription opioids in 2019. The opioid crisis in the United States has been long-standing, but the emergence of COVID-19 has further compounded this situation.

There are currently three medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat opioid use disorders (OUD), including methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone. While all these medications are available through an opioid treatment program (OTP), popularly known as methadone clinics, the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 allowed licensed practitioners in (non-OTP) medical clinics to prescribe and administer buprenorphine and naltrexone. However, methadone, on the other hand, can only be exclusively dispensed through SAMHSA-certified methadone clinics.

The epidemic’s mounting health concerns have highlighted various questions concerning the access to medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD), among other treatments. To help increase access to methadone maintenance treatment during such difficult times, the federal government published proposals allowing for the extension of take-home methadone dosages, among other regulatory changes.

But before we delve into these changes, let’s get a better understanding of what a methadone clinic is and how it functions.

What Is a Methadone Clinic?

A methadone clinic is a medical facility that provides MOUD treatments. Because they also provide other medications like Suboxone and naltrexone, they are more appropriately referred to as substance use disorder services (SUDS). However, since methadone is the most frequently prescribed medication in such facilities, this term is more associated with such clinics.

To dispense OUD medications such as methadone, OTP clinics must be approved by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and registered with the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA).

Methadone clinics provide medications for a specific period to help people in recovery overcome withdrawal symptoms and cravings and, in turn, help them enhance focus on other elements of their recovery. To ensure that each individual receives comprehensive care, they also offer family, group, and one-on-one counseling and other evidence-based therapies.

Services Provided by Methadone Clinics

Clinics must meet specific government regulations to receive OTP certification. In addition, all clinics must provide a minimal set of services, which includes:

A methadone clinic must provide these services as a bare minimum. However, other clinics may go above and beyond these standards by providing a wide range of counseling and holistic therapies.

Treatments Offered at Methadone Clinics

Everyone’s addiction recovery is unique, and people require various treatment alternatives to obtain the best treatment possible. Most methadone clinics provide a variety of treatment options. And medication for opioid use disorder is, of course, at the heart of OTP treatment. However, methadone clinics also place a strong emphasis on counseling and behavioral therapy to provide a whole-person approach to OUD treatment.

The following are the most common treatments offered at methadone clinics:

What Happens at a Methadone Clinic?

Individuals who are addicted to opioids can walk into a methadone clinic and ask to be treated. However, treatment is only provided once an individual is deemed eligible through various initial screening processes and interviews.

Most OTP has similar features, and the process can be divided into three stages.

Assessment and Induction – On the first day, individuals discuss their overall health and substance use history with a healthcare provider at the clinic. Individuals will go through a screening test to confirm that they are in an appropriate withdrawal stage before beginning treatment. An intake counselor will review the individual’s medical history and current condition to tailor a personalized treatment plan.

The physician will decide whether or not you can start taking MOUD the same day based on the findings of your assessments. Before being given the first dose, individuals will be required to review the treatment policies and procedures and sign a consent form stating that they voluntarily agree to treatment and are willing to comply with the rules.

Stabilization – Individuals will start with a low dose of medication. They will receive the same dose for three days to allow the medication to build up in the system. After three days, it’s time to evaluate how well the medication is working. If they are still experiencing withdrawal symptoms, the dose will be increased once every three days until they reach maintenance level.

MaintenanceFor the first 90 days, all individuals must visit their methadone clinic daily for treatment. Individuals who meet their treatment goals and show adequate commitment for the first six months may be allowed to take home medications for a few days or weeks.

Eligibility for Treatment at Methadone Clinics

MOUD treatment is only available to those who meet certain requirements. For example, an individual must be physically dependent on opioids during OTP treatment to meet state and federal standards for this form of treatment. Additionally, they also had to have struggled with their addiction for at least a year before seeking treatment.

Individuals can use a doctor’s letter or records of any previous treatment to prove that their opioid use disorder has lasted at least a year. Suppose a person cannot obtain this documentation; they can have a family member complete a notarized certification of their opioid use. A history of being arrested for opioid use or possession, as well as confirmation from a probation officer, may also qualify a person for treatment.

However, there are exceptions to the one-year rule, such as:

MOUD treatment is often reserved for individuals with severe or long-term addiction and has not responded to other forms of therapy. But individuals under the age of 18 are usually not treated at methadone clinics.

Finding the Right Methadone Clinic

Finding the right methadone clinic is the first step toward recovery from opioid use disorder. It’s important to choose a reliable and experienced medical treatment facility that’s accredited, licensed, and follows federal, state, and local methadone clinic procedures. Candidates can start this process by looking up a methadone clinic’s online reputation.

Here are some important factors to consider when choosing a methadone clinic:

Taking Precautions During Covid-19

Due to the age of social distancing, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has made regulation changes as of March 2020 to help ease and improve the accessibility of MOUD treatments. This regulatory modification included the expansion of take-home methadone doses and access to consume their medication in an unsupervised setting, which appears to be an effective way to ensure that those in treatment have easier access to MOUD treatment during the pandemic.

It’s important to note that state regulations control how medications are dispensed in each opioid treatment program; thus, methods and guidelines may vary from provider to provider depending on the state in which they are located.

The following are SAMHSA guidelines for OTPs during the pandemic:

Furthermore, the DEA has relaxed regulations requiring health care practitioners in OTP to provide one-on-one consultations. OTP is now allowed to provide virtual consultations during an initial evaluation.

Since behavioral health services will most likely be limited, individuals in recovery are encouraged to join online support groups such as “In the Rooms” or “SMART Recovery.” These virtual support groups can help you cope with the stressors of COVID while also providing a sense of community with others in similar situations.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Methadone Clinic appeared first on Syndication Site.

" } ["summary"]=> string(182) "

The post Methadone Clinic appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(18141) "

Originally Posted On: Methadone Clinic

Opioid misuse and dependence remain a major public health crisis in the United States. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), around 9.7 million Americans aged 12 and older misused prescription opioids in 2019. The opioid crisis in the United States has been long-standing, but the emergence of COVID-19 has further compounded this situation.

There are currently three medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat opioid use disorders (OUD), including methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone. While all these medications are available through an opioid treatment program (OTP), popularly known as methadone clinics, the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 allowed licensed practitioners in (non-OTP) medical clinics to prescribe and administer buprenorphine and naltrexone. However, methadone, on the other hand, can only be exclusively dispensed through SAMHSA-certified methadone clinics.

The epidemic’s mounting health concerns have highlighted various questions concerning the access to medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD), among other treatments. To help increase access to methadone maintenance treatment during such difficult times, the federal government published proposals allowing for the extension of take-home methadone dosages, among other regulatory changes.

But before we delve into these changes, let’s get a better understanding of what a methadone clinic is and how it functions.

What Is a Methadone Clinic?

A methadone clinic is a medical facility that provides MOUD treatments. Because they also provide other medications like Suboxone and naltrexone, they are more appropriately referred to as substance use disorder services (SUDS). However, since methadone is the most frequently prescribed medication in such facilities, this term is more associated with such clinics.

To dispense OUD medications such as methadone, OTP clinics must be approved by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and registered with the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA).

Methadone clinics provide medications for a specific period to help people in recovery overcome withdrawal symptoms and cravings and, in turn, help them enhance focus on other elements of their recovery. To ensure that each individual receives comprehensive care, they also offer family, group, and one-on-one counseling and other evidence-based therapies.

Services Provided by Methadone Clinics

Clinics must meet specific government regulations to receive OTP certification. In addition, all clinics must provide a minimal set of services, which includes:

A methadone clinic must provide these services as a bare minimum. However, other clinics may go above and beyond these standards by providing a wide range of counseling and holistic therapies.

Treatments Offered at Methadone Clinics

Everyone’s addiction recovery is unique, and people require various treatment alternatives to obtain the best treatment possible. Most methadone clinics provide a variety of treatment options. And medication for opioid use disorder is, of course, at the heart of OTP treatment. However, methadone clinics also place a strong emphasis on counseling and behavioral therapy to provide a whole-person approach to OUD treatment.

The following are the most common treatments offered at methadone clinics:

What Happens at a Methadone Clinic?

Individuals who are addicted to opioids can walk into a methadone clinic and ask to be treated. However, treatment is only provided once an individual is deemed eligible through various initial screening processes and interviews.

Most OTP has similar features, and the process can be divided into three stages.

Assessment and Induction – On the first day, individuals discuss their overall health and substance use history with a healthcare provider at the clinic. Individuals will go through a screening test to confirm that they are in an appropriate withdrawal stage before beginning treatment. An intake counselor will review the individual’s medical history and current condition to tailor a personalized treatment plan.

The physician will decide whether or not you can start taking MOUD the same day based on the findings of your assessments. Before being given the first dose, individuals will be required to review the treatment policies and procedures and sign a consent form stating that they voluntarily agree to treatment and are willing to comply with the rules.

Stabilization – Individuals will start with a low dose of medication. They will receive the same dose for three days to allow the medication to build up in the system. After three days, it’s time to evaluate how well the medication is working. If they are still experiencing withdrawal symptoms, the dose will be increased once every three days until they reach maintenance level.

MaintenanceFor the first 90 days, all individuals must visit their methadone clinic daily for treatment. Individuals who meet their treatment goals and show adequate commitment for the first six months may be allowed to take home medications for a few days or weeks.

Eligibility for Treatment at Methadone Clinics

MOUD treatment is only available to those who meet certain requirements. For example, an individual must be physically dependent on opioids during OTP treatment to meet state and federal standards for this form of treatment. Additionally, they also had to have struggled with their addiction for at least a year before seeking treatment.

Individuals can use a doctor’s letter or records of any previous treatment to prove that their opioid use disorder has lasted at least a year. Suppose a person cannot obtain this documentation; they can have a family member complete a notarized certification of their opioid use. A history of being arrested for opioid use or possession, as well as confirmation from a probation officer, may also qualify a person for treatment.

However, there are exceptions to the one-year rule, such as:

MOUD treatment is often reserved for individuals with severe or long-term addiction and has not responded to other forms of therapy. But individuals under the age of 18 are usually not treated at methadone clinics.

Finding the Right Methadone Clinic

Finding the right methadone clinic is the first step toward recovery from opioid use disorder. It’s important to choose a reliable and experienced medical treatment facility that’s accredited, licensed, and follows federal, state, and local methadone clinic procedures. Candidates can start this process by looking up a methadone clinic’s online reputation.

Here are some important factors to consider when choosing a methadone clinic:

Taking Precautions During Covid-19

Due to the age of social distancing, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has made regulation changes as of March 2020 to help ease and improve the accessibility of MOUD treatments. This regulatory modification included the expansion of take-home methadone doses and access to consume their medication in an unsupervised setting, which appears to be an effective way to ensure that those in treatment have easier access to MOUD treatment during the pandemic.

It’s important to note that state regulations control how medications are dispensed in each opioid treatment program; thus, methods and guidelines may vary from provider to provider depending on the state in which they are located.

The following are SAMHSA guidelines for OTPs during the pandemic:

Furthermore, the DEA has relaxed regulations requiring health care practitioners in OTP to provide one-on-one consultations. OTP is now allowed to provide virtual consultations during an initial evaluation.

Since behavioral health services will most likely be limited, individuals in recovery are encouraged to join online support groups such as “In the Rooms” or “SMART Recovery.” These virtual support groups can help you cope with the stressors of COVID while also providing a sense of community with others in similar situations.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Methadone Clinic appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1636734127) } [4]=> array(10) { ["title"]=> string(34) "What Are Suboxone Strips Used For?" ["link"]=> string(72) "https://syndication.site/content-feed/what-are-suboxone-strips-used-for/" ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 11 Nov 2021 14:28:18 +0000" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(16) "Syndication Site" } ["guid"]=> string(72) "https://syndication.site/content-feed/what-are-suboxone-strips-used-for/" ["description"]=> string(215) "

The post What Are Suboxone Strips Used For? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(15059) "

Originally Posted On: What Are Suboxone Strips Used For?

 


What Are Suboxone Strips Used For?

Suboxone strips, also referred to as Suboxone films, are a form of Suboxone approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2002 to treat opioid use disorder (OUD). Suboxone films contain buprenorphine and naloxone as the active ingredients. And they are available in easily dissolvable strips to be administered sublingually (under the tongue) or buccally (between the gums and the inner lining of the cheek).

Suboxone films contain the same ratio of active ingredients and are available in the same dosage as Suboxone pills. However, the misuse potential is relatively lower for Suboxone films compared to the tablet form as they cannot be crushed and snorted. Suboxone sublingual has also been observed to absorb more quickly and effectively than pills. Suboxone films can be prescribed by doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other medical professionals licensed to prescribe medications.

What Are Suboxone Strips

Suboxone strips help individuals with opioid use disorders achieve long-term recovery and regain control over their lives. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the buprenorphine in Suboxone is a partial opioid agonist medication that works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain to reduce withdrawal symptoms and opioid cravings. And naloxone, on the other hand, is an opioid antagonist (inhibitor) that works by blocking the effects of other opioids to reduce the risk of overdose and relapse. Both work together to help reduce withdrawal symptoms associated with OUD and help individuals in recovery focus on other elements of their rehabilitation program.

How Are Suboxone Strips Taken?

Suboxone sublingual films are administered by either placing it under the tongue or the inner cheeks until it is completely dissolved. These strips generally take around six to 10 minutes to dissolve completely. If two strips are taken, the films should be placed on opposite sides under the tongue or inner cheeks without overlapping them. If more than two strips are taken, the next films should be placed after the first two have completely dissolved.

Suboxone sublingual film strips should not be chewed or swallowed whole. Doing so will not generate the desired effects as they are not designed to be split or broken. Suboxone films should also not be taken with benzodiazepines, alcohol, or other substances. People who take Suboxone with such substances are at higher risk of experiencing serious health effects, including overdose death.

Who Should Not Use Suboxone Strips?

The combination of buprenorphine and naloxone makes Suboxone films an excellent medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD) as it possesses a low risk for addiction and misuse. However, Suboxone treatment may not be ideal for everyone with opioid dependence.

Suboxone films may not be recommended for people who are:

It’s also important to talk to your healthcare provider if you have any of the following health conditions:

Your healthcare practitioner can help you by adjusting your Suboxone dosage or provide you with an alternative treatment.

What Are Suboxone Strips Used For - Eleanor Health

Side Effects of Suboxone Film Strips

As with any medication, Suboxone can also cause a few negative side effects. Suboxone side effects tend to be mild and are most often similar to opioid withdrawal symptoms.

Some of the common side effects of Suboxone include:

In rare instances, Suboxone can also cause severe side effects. People are advised to contact their healthcare provider immediately if they experience any of the following side effects:

It’s crucial to refrain from driving or partaking in any hazardous activities while on Suboxone until you know how Suboxone affects you.

How Long Do Suboxone Strips Stay in Your System?

The half-life of Suboxone’s active ingredient, buprenorphine, is estimated to be around 37 to 42 hours. Since it takes around five half-lives for a substance to completely leave the body, it may take around seven to nine days for buprenorphine to leave the body completely. However, as the liver breaks down buprenorphine into metabolites called norbuprenorphine with an estimated half-life of up to 150 hours, buprenorphine can remain detectable in the body for up to two weeks after the last dose.

The naloxone in the medication has a half-life of around two to 12 hours. Thus, it can stay in the body for up to 60 hours, although it generally clears well before buprenorphine.

Suboxone generally takes seven to nine days to leave the body completely. However, this may differ from person to person based on factors such as:

Suboxone Addiction

Although Suboxone is potentially addictive, the risk of Suboxone addiction is relatively low compared to addictions to other opioids. This risk is lowered because Suboxone does not generate as intense of a sedative effect as most opioids. In addition, it also generates a “ceiling effect” that makes it difficult to enhance its intoxicating effects by taking large doses of the medication. But since the buprenorphine in the medication can trigger withdrawal symptoms when Suboxone use is stopped abruptly, individuals are gradually tapered off the medication by medical professionals towards the end of treatment.

Suboxone has attracted numerous headlines for being a game-changer in the battle against opioid addiction. However, for Suboxone to be successful, it has to be provided in conjunction with other elements of a comprehensive treatment regimen such as counseling and behavioral therapy.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post What Are Suboxone Strips Used For? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" } ["summary"]=> string(215) "

The post What Are Suboxone Strips Used For? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(15059) "

Originally Posted On: What Are Suboxone Strips Used For?

 


What Are Suboxone Strips Used For?

Suboxone strips, also referred to as Suboxone films, are a form of Suboxone approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2002 to treat opioid use disorder (OUD). Suboxone films contain buprenorphine and naloxone as the active ingredients. And they are available in easily dissolvable strips to be administered sublingually (under the tongue) or buccally (between the gums and the inner lining of the cheek).

Suboxone films contain the same ratio of active ingredients and are available in the same dosage as Suboxone pills. However, the misuse potential is relatively lower for Suboxone films compared to the tablet form as they cannot be crushed and snorted. Suboxone sublingual has also been observed to absorb more quickly and effectively than pills. Suboxone films can be prescribed by doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other medical professionals licensed to prescribe medications.

What Are Suboxone Strips

Suboxone strips help individuals with opioid use disorders achieve long-term recovery and regain control over their lives. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the buprenorphine in Suboxone is a partial opioid agonist medication that works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain to reduce withdrawal symptoms and opioid cravings. And naloxone, on the other hand, is an opioid antagonist (inhibitor) that works by blocking the effects of other opioids to reduce the risk of overdose and relapse. Both work together to help reduce withdrawal symptoms associated with OUD and help individuals in recovery focus on other elements of their rehabilitation program.

How Are Suboxone Strips Taken?

Suboxone sublingual films are administered by either placing it under the tongue or the inner cheeks until it is completely dissolved. These strips generally take around six to 10 minutes to dissolve completely. If two strips are taken, the films should be placed on opposite sides under the tongue or inner cheeks without overlapping them. If more than two strips are taken, the next films should be placed after the first two have completely dissolved.

Suboxone sublingual film strips should not be chewed or swallowed whole. Doing so will not generate the desired effects as they are not designed to be split or broken. Suboxone films should also not be taken with benzodiazepines, alcohol, or other substances. People who take Suboxone with such substances are at higher risk of experiencing serious health effects, including overdose death.

Who Should Not Use Suboxone Strips?

The combination of buprenorphine and naloxone makes Suboxone films an excellent medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD) as it possesses a low risk for addiction and misuse. However, Suboxone treatment may not be ideal for everyone with opioid dependence.

Suboxone films may not be recommended for people who are:

It’s also important to talk to your healthcare provider if you have any of the following health conditions:

Your healthcare practitioner can help you by adjusting your Suboxone dosage or provide you with an alternative treatment.

What Are Suboxone Strips Used For - Eleanor Health

Side Effects of Suboxone Film Strips

As with any medication, Suboxone can also cause a few negative side effects. Suboxone side effects tend to be mild and are most often similar to opioid withdrawal symptoms.

Some of the common side effects of Suboxone include:

In rare instances, Suboxone can also cause severe side effects. People are advised to contact their healthcare provider immediately if they experience any of the following side effects:

It’s crucial to refrain from driving or partaking in any hazardous activities while on Suboxone until you know how Suboxone affects you.

How Long Do Suboxone Strips Stay in Your System?

The half-life of Suboxone’s active ingredient, buprenorphine, is estimated to be around 37 to 42 hours. Since it takes around five half-lives for a substance to completely leave the body, it may take around seven to nine days for buprenorphine to leave the body completely. However, as the liver breaks down buprenorphine into metabolites called norbuprenorphine with an estimated half-life of up to 150 hours, buprenorphine can remain detectable in the body for up to two weeks after the last dose.

The naloxone in the medication has a half-life of around two to 12 hours. Thus, it can stay in the body for up to 60 hours, although it generally clears well before buprenorphine.

Suboxone generally takes seven to nine days to leave the body completely. However, this may differ from person to person based on factors such as:

Suboxone Addiction

Although Suboxone is potentially addictive, the risk of Suboxone addiction is relatively low compared to addictions to other opioids. This risk is lowered because Suboxone does not generate as intense of a sedative effect as most opioids. In addition, it also generates a “ceiling effect” that makes it difficult to enhance its intoxicating effects by taking large doses of the medication. But since the buprenorphine in the medication can trigger withdrawal symptoms when Suboxone use is stopped abruptly, individuals are gradually tapered off the medication by medical professionals towards the end of treatment.

Suboxone has attracted numerous headlines for being a game-changer in the battle against opioid addiction. However, for Suboxone to be successful, it has to be provided in conjunction with other elements of a comprehensive treatment regimen such as counseling and behavioral therapy.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post What Are Suboxone Strips Used For? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1636640898) } [5]=> array(10) { ["title"]=> string(28) "Can You Drink on Naltrexone?" ["link"]=> string(66) "https://syndication.site/content-feed/can-you-drink-on-naltrexone/" ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 11 Nov 2021 14:24:08 +0000" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(16) "Syndication Site" } ["guid"]=> string(66) "https://syndication.site/content-feed/can-you-drink-on-naltrexone/" ["description"]=> string(203) "

The post Can You Drink on Naltrexone? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(15639) "

Originally Posted On: Can You Drink on Naltrexone?

 

Can You Drink on Naltrexone?

Addiction claims the lives of thousands of Americans each year and affects millions more. Addiction, also known as substance use disorder (SUD), is a medical condition in which people find it difficult to stop or manage their substance use despite social, occupational, or health repercussions. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), substance use disorder is classified as a chronic, relapsing mental disorder that can vary in severity. It causes long-term alterations in the brain, perpetuating the condition and making people vulnerable to a relapse. Fortunately, many evidence-based treatments and medications are available to help individuals with a SUD achieve and maintain sobriety, regardless of its severity.

Treatment for substance use disorders often involves abstinence-only based approaches. However, some individuals can benefit from treatment even while still using it. One such alternative treatment involves a medication called naltrexone, which allows individuals to reduce their heavy drinking habits gradually.

Naltrexone is usually recommended for individuals who have stopped drinking or completed an alcohol detoxification program. However, individuals actively consuming alcohol can also participate in naltrexone treatment.

How Does Naltrexone Work

Naltrexone is a medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat both opioid use disorder (OUD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD). Naltrexone is marketed under the brand names of ReVia, Vivitrol, and Depade. And is designed to help manage opioid and alcohol cravings and feelings of intoxication associated with substance misuse.

Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist, meaning that it works by blocking the intoxicating and sedative effects of opioids like heroin, morphine, and codeine. Its mechanism differs from that of buprenorphine and methadone, which stimulate opioid receptors and reduce cravings. Naltrexone, as a medication for alcohol use disorder (MAUD), works by blocking the endorphin receptors in the body to suppress the effects of alcohol. Naltrexone, unlike many other medications, possesses no risk of misuse or dependence. In addition, naltrexone is a non-addictive and non-narcotic medication that does not cause withdrawal symptoms during cessation.

As with any maintenance medications, it’s most effective when combined with a comprehensive treatment plan that includes counseling, behavioral therapies, and social support groups.

How Is Naltrexone Prescribed?

Although naltrexone isn’t a controlled substance, it’s currently available only via a prescription. Any licensed physician can prescribe naltrexone to adults 18 years of age and older. The extended-release injectable naltrexone (Vivitrol), on the other hand, does have to be administered in a clinical setting.

Naltrexone in pill form (ReVia, Depade) is taken once a day at a dose of 50 mg. In contrast, the injectable extended-release form (Vivitrol) is given once a month at a dose of 380 mg intramuscularly. Missing doses can hinder its effectiveness and increase the risk of a relapse.

Individuals are advised to abstain from illegal opioids and opioid medication for at least seven to 14 days before starting naltrexone to lower the risk of precipitated withdrawal, also known as sudden opioid withdrawal syndrome (SOWS). While naltrexone cannot be taken with opioids in the system, it can be taken while still drinking. The duration of naltrexone treatment varies from person to person, depending on individual needs and circumstances.

Drinking While on Naltrexone

Naltrexone can be a beneficial tool for those who wish to cut down on drinking. When taken as prescribed, naltrexone allows people to drink alcohol in moderation and reduce their motivation to keep drinking.

Naltrexone functions by:

The main goal of most rehabilitation programs is complete alcohol abstinence. However, for some individuals with severe alcohol use disorder disease, avoiding or preventing relapses may be very difficult. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 50% of individuals relapse within 12 weeks after starting treatment. And up to 90% will relapse at least once in the four years after treatment. When continuous abstinence is not possible, or for those who are not setting a goal of abstinence but rather wish to have controlled drinking, other goals, such as lowering the number, frequency, or severity of relapses, may be of significant value.

According to research, those who take naltrexone experience fewer heavy drinking days and cravings, which means they can better regulate their drinking habits. They can also maintain a level of drinking that is comfortable for them, whether that means cutting back, moderating or controlling their alcohol consumption, or quitting entirely.

It’s vital to note that drinking heavily while on naltrexone to “get over” the boundary and enjoy the effects of alcohol is never a good idea. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), although it’s safe to drink in moderation and for a reasonable amount of time while on naltrexone, continuing to misuse alcohol can create toxic effects that could damage the liver.

Can You Drink on Naltrexone - Eleanor Health

How Long Does Naltrexone Last?

How long naltrexone stays in the body depends on many factors. These factors include the type of medication taken (oral pill or a monthly injection) and the screening method.

The timetable for detecting naltrexone in the system is also dependent upon factors such as:

Naltrexone can be found in urine for up to six hours after the last dose. Most variants of oral naltrexone can be detected in a blood test for up to 24 hours. In addition, naltrexone can be detected for up to a day in a saliva test and up to 90 days in a hair follicle test. Naltrexone medications such as Vivitrol can remain detectable in drug tests for more than 25 days.

How Long Does Naltrexone Block Alcohol?

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), naltrexone has a maximum effect of one hour after administration. The anti-craving effects of naltrexone last longer than many other medications. And naltrexone has a half-life of four to 13 hours in the body. The half-life of a medication refers to the time it takes for the active substance of the medication to reduce in half. Naltrexone is normally taken before drinking and usually lasts the entire night, which is why only one tablet is advised per day.

What to Avoid When Taking Naltrexone

Like most medications, naltrexone can interact with other substances and cause severe side effects. Because naltrexone is used to treat alcohol and opioid addiction, individuals are advised to avoid these substances during treatment.

The following medications can adversely interact with naltrexone:

In addition, avoid using illicit substances while taking naltrexone as they can increase the side effects of the medication. Discuss all medications currently being taken, including over-the-counter medications and herbal supplements, with your doctor before naltrexone treatment. It’s also important to inform your physician if you’ve recently used opioids or opioid-containing medications for any medical condition before starting naltrexone to avoid an opioid withdrawal.

Individuals who wish to be on naltrexone treatment may initially undergo a naloxone challenge test before treatment. This test is performed to evaluate physical dependence on opioids. You will be given naltrexone orally, as an intramuscular injection, or by IV. A positive test is suggestive of physical dependence and consists of common withdrawal symptoms. If your naloxone challenge test is positive, or if you test positive for opioids, naltrexone treatment will be delayed in order to avoid causing opioid withdrawal symptoms.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Can You Drink on Naltrexone? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" } ["summary"]=> string(203) "

The post Can You Drink on Naltrexone? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(15639) "

Originally Posted On: Can You Drink on Naltrexone?

 

Can You Drink on Naltrexone?

Addiction claims the lives of thousands of Americans each year and affects millions more. Addiction, also known as substance use disorder (SUD), is a medical condition in which people find it difficult to stop or manage their substance use despite social, occupational, or health repercussions. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), substance use disorder is classified as a chronic, relapsing mental disorder that can vary in severity. It causes long-term alterations in the brain, perpetuating the condition and making people vulnerable to a relapse. Fortunately, many evidence-based treatments and medications are available to help individuals with a SUD achieve and maintain sobriety, regardless of its severity.

Treatment for substance use disorders often involves abstinence-only based approaches. However, some individuals can benefit from treatment even while still using it. One such alternative treatment involves a medication called naltrexone, which allows individuals to reduce their heavy drinking habits gradually.

Naltrexone is usually recommended for individuals who have stopped drinking or completed an alcohol detoxification program. However, individuals actively consuming alcohol can also participate in naltrexone treatment.

How Does Naltrexone Work

Naltrexone is a medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat both opioid use disorder (OUD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD). Naltrexone is marketed under the brand names of ReVia, Vivitrol, and Depade. And is designed to help manage opioid and alcohol cravings and feelings of intoxication associated with substance misuse.

Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist, meaning that it works by blocking the intoxicating and sedative effects of opioids like heroin, morphine, and codeine. Its mechanism differs from that of buprenorphine and methadone, which stimulate opioid receptors and reduce cravings. Naltrexone, as a medication for alcohol use disorder (MAUD), works by blocking the endorphin receptors in the body to suppress the effects of alcohol. Naltrexone, unlike many other medications, possesses no risk of misuse or dependence. In addition, naltrexone is a non-addictive and non-narcotic medication that does not cause withdrawal symptoms during cessation.

As with any maintenance medications, it’s most effective when combined with a comprehensive treatment plan that includes counseling, behavioral therapies, and social support groups.

How Is Naltrexone Prescribed?

Although naltrexone isn’t a controlled substance, it’s currently available only via a prescription. Any licensed physician can prescribe naltrexone to adults 18 years of age and older. The extended-release injectable naltrexone (Vivitrol), on the other hand, does have to be administered in a clinical setting.

Naltrexone in pill form (ReVia, Depade) is taken once a day at a dose of 50 mg. In contrast, the injectable extended-release form (Vivitrol) is given once a month at a dose of 380 mg intramuscularly. Missing doses can hinder its effectiveness and increase the risk of a relapse.

Individuals are advised to abstain from illegal opioids and opioid medication for at least seven to 14 days before starting naltrexone to lower the risk of precipitated withdrawal, also known as sudden opioid withdrawal syndrome (SOWS). While naltrexone cannot be taken with opioids in the system, it can be taken while still drinking. The duration of naltrexone treatment varies from person to person, depending on individual needs and circumstances.

Drinking While on Naltrexone

Naltrexone can be a beneficial tool for those who wish to cut down on drinking. When taken as prescribed, naltrexone allows people to drink alcohol in moderation and reduce their motivation to keep drinking.

Naltrexone functions by:

The main goal of most rehabilitation programs is complete alcohol abstinence. However, for some individuals with severe alcohol use disorder disease, avoiding or preventing relapses may be very difficult. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 50% of individuals relapse within 12 weeks after starting treatment. And up to 90% will relapse at least once in the four years after treatment. When continuous abstinence is not possible, or for those who are not setting a goal of abstinence but rather wish to have controlled drinking, other goals, such as lowering the number, frequency, or severity of relapses, may be of significant value.

According to research, those who take naltrexone experience fewer heavy drinking days and cravings, which means they can better regulate their drinking habits. They can also maintain a level of drinking that is comfortable for them, whether that means cutting back, moderating or controlling their alcohol consumption, or quitting entirely.

It’s vital to note that drinking heavily while on naltrexone to “get over” the boundary and enjoy the effects of alcohol is never a good idea. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), although it’s safe to drink in moderation and for a reasonable amount of time while on naltrexone, continuing to misuse alcohol can create toxic effects that could damage the liver.

Can You Drink on Naltrexone - Eleanor Health

How Long Does Naltrexone Last?

How long naltrexone stays in the body depends on many factors. These factors include the type of medication taken (oral pill or a monthly injection) and the screening method.

The timetable for detecting naltrexone in the system is also dependent upon factors such as:

Naltrexone can be found in urine for up to six hours after the last dose. Most variants of oral naltrexone can be detected in a blood test for up to 24 hours. In addition, naltrexone can be detected for up to a day in a saliva test and up to 90 days in a hair follicle test. Naltrexone medications such as Vivitrol can remain detectable in drug tests for more than 25 days.

How Long Does Naltrexone Block Alcohol?

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), naltrexone has a maximum effect of one hour after administration. The anti-craving effects of naltrexone last longer than many other medications. And naltrexone has a half-life of four to 13 hours in the body. The half-life of a medication refers to the time it takes for the active substance of the medication to reduce in half. Naltrexone is normally taken before drinking and usually lasts the entire night, which is why only one tablet is advised per day.

What to Avoid When Taking Naltrexone

Like most medications, naltrexone can interact with other substances and cause severe side effects. Because naltrexone is used to treat alcohol and opioid addiction, individuals are advised to avoid these substances during treatment.

The following medications can adversely interact with naltrexone:

In addition, avoid using illicit substances while taking naltrexone as they can increase the side effects of the medication. Discuss all medications currently being taken, including over-the-counter medications and herbal supplements, with your doctor before naltrexone treatment. It’s also important to inform your physician if you’ve recently used opioids or opioid-containing medications for any medical condition before starting naltrexone to avoid an opioid withdrawal.

Individuals who wish to be on naltrexone treatment may initially undergo a naloxone challenge test before treatment. This test is performed to evaluate physical dependence on opioids. You will be given naltrexone orally, as an intramuscular injection, or by IV. A positive test is suggestive of physical dependence and consists of common withdrawal symptoms. If your naloxone challenge test is positive, or if you test positive for opioids, naltrexone treatment will be delayed in order to avoid causing opioid withdrawal symptoms.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Can You Drink on Naltrexone? appeared first on Syndication Site.

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The post Benzodiazepines and Opioids appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(23415) "

Originally Posted On: Benzodiazepines and Opioids

Benzodiazepines and opioids are widely used in the medical field to treat various health conditions. Their use and effectiveness in managing certain health conditions have made them the treatment of choice among the thousands of healthcare providers in the U.S. and worldwide. According to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), benzodiazepines, or benzos, are prescribed at about 66 million doctors’ appointments per year in the U.S., and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), around 153 million opioid prescriptions were dispensed in 2019 alone.

Benzos and opioids are both central nervous system depressants with a high potential for addiction and dependence. However, benzos and opioids fall into two entirely different classifications and are designed for different purposes.

Difference Between Benzos and Opiates

Benzodiazepines, also known as mild tranquilizers, are central nervous system (CNS) depressants widely prescribed for various mental health conditions. They treat moderate to severe panic disorders, anxiety disorders, epileptic seizures, and withdrawal from other CNS depressants such as alcohol.

Most benzodiazepines come in a pill or tablet form for oral consumption, although some brands are also available as a clear, odorless liquid to be administered intravenously. Benzodiazepines are highly regulated and considered the most prominent of all anti-anxiety medications for immediate relief.

There are over 2000 different types of benzos available. However, only around 15 are currently approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Some of the common types of benzos are:

Opioids, also known as narcotics, are substances derived from opium, a natural chemical in poppy seeds and plants or synthesized in laboratories. They include the illegal substance heroin, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, and prescription pain relievers such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and codeine. Prescription opioids are used to treat mild to chronic pain and are also prescribed for pain management after surgery. Opioids are available as tablets, liquid, and film formations and are categorized as opioid antagonists and opioid agonists.

Opioid antagonists are not addictive and include medications such as:

Opioid agonists are addictive and include medications such as:

Opioid addiction remains a major health concern in the U.S. As a result, the opioid crisis was declared a “public health emergency” in 2017.

Benzos Vs. Opiates – How Do They Work?

Benzodiazepines work by amplifying the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA is a neurotransmitter responsible for reducing brain activity related to reasoning, memory, emotions, and essential functions, such as breathing. Hence, by enhancing this neurotransmitter, benzodiazepines help counteract overstimulation caused by anxiety and induce a state of relaxation. In addition, benzodiazepines are relatively fast-acting and can alleviate symptoms within a short period.

In contrast, opioids work by attaching to the opioid receptors in the brain, gut, spinal cord, and other parts of the body. Thus, they help block pain messages sent from the body to the brain and, in turn, relieve both emotional and physical pain. Since most opioids activate opioid receptors, they can be highly habit-forming. However, opioid antagonists, on the other hand, occupy the opioid receptors without activating them, making them a treatment choice for alcohol use disorder (AUD) and opioid use disorder (OUD) that carries less risk of misuse and addiction.

Side Effects of Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepines can cause side effects ranging from mild to severe. The side effects may differ from one person to another but generally include:

Some of the less common side effects of benzos include:

Some of the rare side effects of benzodiazepines include:

It is crucial for people on this anti-anxiety medication to inform their health care professionals regarding any negative side effects to address them duly.

Side Effects of Opioids

Medical professionals closely monitor people on opioid medications due to their ability to cause various side effects. Opioid side effects range from mild to severe and generally include:

Some of the less common side effects of opioids are:

Tolerance, addiction, and dependence are also a few other side effects of opioids. Prolonged use of opioids leads to tolerance and requires individuals to take more medication to achieve the desired effects. The formation of tolerance will gradually lead to physical dependence and addiction, even if the medication is used as prescribed. In addition, individuals with a dependence or addiction to opioids may experience withdrawal symptoms when they reduce or quit their use abruptly. Hence, it’s vital to seek the guidance of a health care provider before stopping them after prolonged use.

Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

Like opioids, benzodiazepines can also trigger a withdrawal phase when their use is discontinued after a certain period. Benzodiazepine withdrawal can manifest after as little as one month of use. The onset of withdrawal depends on the specific type of benzo taken but may begin in as little as eight hours or within two to three days.

Some of the symptoms of benzodiazepine withdrawal are:

Benzo withdrawal can be a difficult and potentially dangerous process. Therefore medical professionals wean people off these prescription medications through a gradual dose reduction.

Opioid Withdrawal

The severity and duration of opioid withdrawal are determined based on several factors: the duration of use, the frequency of use, and the doses taken. Opioid withdrawal symptoms range from mild to severe and may begin within 24 hours from the last dose.

Some of the symptoms of opioid withdrawal include:

Opioid withdrawal symptoms usually improve within 72 hours and reduce in intensity within a week.

Benzodiazepine Overdose

In addition to the risk of misuse, withdrawal, and addiction, benzos can also increase the risk of overdose. An overdose occurs when an individual consumes large doses of benzodiazepines or mixes them with other substances such as alcohol to enhance its effects.

Some of the symptoms of a benzodiazepine overdose are:

While the possibility of a benzo overdose is significantly low, so too is the risk of fatal consequences when taken alone. However, misusing benzos can cause serious health complications and should be used with caution.

Opioid Overdose

An opioid overdose transpires when an individual takes large quantities of an illicit opioid or an opioid pain reliever or mixes it with other substances. Opioid overdoses are fatal in most instances due to their effects on the brain region that regulates breathing. Hence, it’s vital to seek immediate medical attention when someone faces the following symptoms:

Overdose deaths related to opioids are a significant health concern in the modern world. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), opioid-involved overdose deaths increased from 468,02 in 2018 to 49,860 in 2019.

The Risk of Mixing Benzos and Opiates

There is an increasing trend in the number of people combining benzos and opioids for recreational purposes. Since both substances are easily accessible, some people tend to combine them to enhance the intoxicating effects of either of the substances. However, such a combination can be fatal, as both the substances are central nervous system depressants that suppress breathing. Combining them can depress breathing to dangerous levels and lead to a fatal overdose. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), about 16% of opioid overdose deaths in 2019 also involved benzodiazepines.

Misusing both benzos and opioids over a prolonged period can also damage vital organs, memory loss, and cause brain damage. As such, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued new guidelines in 2016 recommending clinicians to avoid prescribing opioids and benzodiazepines concurrently whenever possible.

While benzos and opioids are two different medications widely prescribed to treat various health conditions, their associated risks and health concerns must be acknowledged to avoid negative situations.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Benzodiazepines and Opioids appeared first on Syndication Site.

" } ["summary"]=> string(192) "

The post Benzodiazepines and Opioids appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(23415) "

Originally Posted On: Benzodiazepines and Opioids

Benzodiazepines and opioids are widely used in the medical field to treat various health conditions. Their use and effectiveness in managing certain health conditions have made them the treatment of choice among the thousands of healthcare providers in the U.S. and worldwide. According to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), benzodiazepines, or benzos, are prescribed at about 66 million doctors’ appointments per year in the U.S., and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), around 153 million opioid prescriptions were dispensed in 2019 alone.

Benzos and opioids are both central nervous system depressants with a high potential for addiction and dependence. However, benzos and opioids fall into two entirely different classifications and are designed for different purposes.

Difference Between Benzos and Opiates

Benzodiazepines, also known as mild tranquilizers, are central nervous system (CNS) depressants widely prescribed for various mental health conditions. They treat moderate to severe panic disorders, anxiety disorders, epileptic seizures, and withdrawal from other CNS depressants such as alcohol.

Most benzodiazepines come in a pill or tablet form for oral consumption, although some brands are also available as a clear, odorless liquid to be administered intravenously. Benzodiazepines are highly regulated and considered the most prominent of all anti-anxiety medications for immediate relief.

There are over 2000 different types of benzos available. However, only around 15 are currently approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Some of the common types of benzos are:

Opioids, also known as narcotics, are substances derived from opium, a natural chemical in poppy seeds and plants or synthesized in laboratories. They include the illegal substance heroin, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, and prescription pain relievers such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and codeine. Prescription opioids are used to treat mild to chronic pain and are also prescribed for pain management after surgery. Opioids are available as tablets, liquid, and film formations and are categorized as opioid antagonists and opioid agonists.

Opioid antagonists are not addictive and include medications such as:

Opioid agonists are addictive and include medications such as:

Opioid addiction remains a major health concern in the U.S. As a result, the opioid crisis was declared a “public health emergency” in 2017.

Benzos Vs. Opiates – How Do They Work?

Benzodiazepines work by amplifying the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA is a neurotransmitter responsible for reducing brain activity related to reasoning, memory, emotions, and essential functions, such as breathing. Hence, by enhancing this neurotransmitter, benzodiazepines help counteract overstimulation caused by anxiety and induce a state of relaxation. In addition, benzodiazepines are relatively fast-acting and can alleviate symptoms within a short period.

In contrast, opioids work by attaching to the opioid receptors in the brain, gut, spinal cord, and other parts of the body. Thus, they help block pain messages sent from the body to the brain and, in turn, relieve both emotional and physical pain. Since most opioids activate opioid receptors, they can be highly habit-forming. However, opioid antagonists, on the other hand, occupy the opioid receptors without activating them, making them a treatment choice for alcohol use disorder (AUD) and opioid use disorder (OUD) that carries less risk of misuse and addiction.

Side Effects of Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepines can cause side effects ranging from mild to severe. The side effects may differ from one person to another but generally include:

Some of the less common side effects of benzos include:

Some of the rare side effects of benzodiazepines include:

It is crucial for people on this anti-anxiety medication to inform their health care professionals regarding any negative side effects to address them duly.

Side Effects of Opioids

Medical professionals closely monitor people on opioid medications due to their ability to cause various side effects. Opioid side effects range from mild to severe and generally include:

Some of the less common side effects of opioids are:

Tolerance, addiction, and dependence are also a few other side effects of opioids. Prolonged use of opioids leads to tolerance and requires individuals to take more medication to achieve the desired effects. The formation of tolerance will gradually lead to physical dependence and addiction, even if the medication is used as prescribed. In addition, individuals with a dependence or addiction to opioids may experience withdrawal symptoms when they reduce or quit their use abruptly. Hence, it’s vital to seek the guidance of a health care provider before stopping them after prolonged use.

Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

Like opioids, benzodiazepines can also trigger a withdrawal phase when their use is discontinued after a certain period. Benzodiazepine withdrawal can manifest after as little as one month of use. The onset of withdrawal depends on the specific type of benzo taken but may begin in as little as eight hours or within two to three days.

Some of the symptoms of benzodiazepine withdrawal are:

Benzo withdrawal can be a difficult and potentially dangerous process. Therefore medical professionals wean people off these prescription medications through a gradual dose reduction.

Opioid Withdrawal

The severity and duration of opioid withdrawal are determined based on several factors: the duration of use, the frequency of use, and the doses taken. Opioid withdrawal symptoms range from mild to severe and may begin within 24 hours from the last dose.

Some of the symptoms of opioid withdrawal include:

Opioid withdrawal symptoms usually improve within 72 hours and reduce in intensity within a week.

Benzodiazepine Overdose

In addition to the risk of misuse, withdrawal, and addiction, benzos can also increase the risk of overdose. An overdose occurs when an individual consumes large doses of benzodiazepines or mixes them with other substances such as alcohol to enhance its effects.

Some of the symptoms of a benzodiazepine overdose are:

While the possibility of a benzo overdose is significantly low, so too is the risk of fatal consequences when taken alone. However, misusing benzos can cause serious health complications and should be used with caution.

Opioid Overdose

An opioid overdose transpires when an individual takes large quantities of an illicit opioid or an opioid pain reliever or mixes it with other substances. Opioid overdoses are fatal in most instances due to their effects on the brain region that regulates breathing. Hence, it’s vital to seek immediate medical attention when someone faces the following symptoms:

Overdose deaths related to opioids are a significant health concern in the modern world. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), opioid-involved overdose deaths increased from 468,02 in 2018 to 49,860 in 2019.

The Risk of Mixing Benzos and Opiates

There is an increasing trend in the number of people combining benzos and opioids for recreational purposes. Since both substances are easily accessible, some people tend to combine them to enhance the intoxicating effects of either of the substances. However, such a combination can be fatal, as both the substances are central nervous system depressants that suppress breathing. Combining them can depress breathing to dangerous levels and lead to a fatal overdose. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), about 16% of opioid overdose deaths in 2019 also involved benzodiazepines.

Misusing both benzos and opioids over a prolonged period can also damage vital organs, memory loss, and cause brain damage. As such, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued new guidelines in 2016 recommending clinicians to avoid prescribing opioids and benzodiazepines concurrently whenever possible.

While benzos and opioids are two different medications widely prescribed to treat various health conditions, their associated risks and health concerns must be acknowledged to avoid negative situations.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Benzodiazepines and Opioids appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1636562996) } [7]=> array(10) { ["title"]=> string(20) "Is Kratom an Opioid?" ["link"]=> string(58) "https://syndication.site/content-feed/is-kratom-an-opioid/" ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 10 Nov 2021 16:35:43 +0000" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(16) "Syndication Site" } ["guid"]=> string(58) "https://syndication.site/content-feed/is-kratom-an-opioid/" ["description"]=> string(187) "

The post Is Kratom an Opioid? appeared first on Syndication Site.

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Originally Posted On: Is Kratom an Opioid?

 

Is Kratom an Opioid - Eleanor Health

Plant-based compounds have been used throughout human history, whether for pain relief or as part of religious ceremonies. Emerging from the shadows of the current opioid epidemic is kratom, a plant leaf extract used to manage chronic pain and fatigue in Southeast Asian countries for centuries and is believed to have a similar mechanism of action to opioids.

Kratom’s use has garnered considerable attention in the U.S., and it’s now listed as a “medication of concern” by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Although kratom is allowed at the federal level, it’s prohibited in certain states. Additionally, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has imposed several restrictions on kratom, including import restrictions. Yet certain people who take kratom seem to highly recommend it, claiming that it has helped them manage their pain and opioid withdrawal.

Natural plant compounds will undoubtedly continue to play an important role as sources of therapeutic agents. However, as of 2021, federal regulation will stay on hold as the debate over kratom continues. In addition, the FDA has issued warnings to companies that sell kratom in the United States or illegally market kratom as a herbal supplement to treat addiction, anxiety, pain, and other health conditions, as only FDA-approved medications are allowed to make such claims. As such, the future legal status of kratom is yet to be seen.

So is kratom an opioid? While kratom and opioids are two different substances, the FDA classifies kratom as an opioid. Before we go into the reasoning behind this classification, let’s take a closer look at kratom.

What Is Kratom?

Kratom is a tropical tree indigenous to Southeast Asia and certain parts of Africa, with a long history of medical and ceremonial use. Traditionally kratom was consumed in its natural form to reduce fatigue. However, various forms can now be found, including dried or crushed leaves, capsules, tablets, liquids, and resin. Kratom leaves induce stimulating effects at low doses and sedative effects at high doses.

In the United States, kratom is most typically sold as a dietary or nutritional supplement or under the radar in tobacco or head shops. And it is a substance that is fast becoming a popular alternative therapy and the substance of choice on the recreational market in the U.S.

How Does Kratom Work?

The two main compounds in kratom leaves (mitragynine and 7-α-hydroxy mitragynine) interact with opioid receptors in the brain. As a result, these chemicals generate sedative effects when consumed in large doses and stimulating effects in lower doses. Doctors believe that kratom binds to the same regions of the nerve cell as opioid medicines, thus causing similar effects in the brain. However, there are still insufficient clinical trials and studies to understand the long-term health implications and precise function of kratom.

According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the compound 7-hydroxy mitragynine is about 13 times stronger than morphine. As a result, these compounds cross the blood-brain barrier at a much faster rate. There are currently 25 compounds identified in kratom, and one such compound contributes to the psychoactive effects of kratom.

Kratom Effects

Kratom in low doses can induce increased energy, sociability, and alertness. However, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), kratom can also cause uncomfortable mental and physical health effects such as:

Additionally, kratom can also cause “intoxication,” similar to the effects of opioid misuse. The interaction of kratom with opioid receptors in the brain is compared to how morphine interacts with the brain. Opioid medications attach to opioid receptors, causing a rush of neurotransmitters, or chemical messengers, in the brain, which helps regulate mood and influence decision-making. When the levels of these neurotransmitters in the brain are elevated, it helps improve mood.

The symptoms of kratom misuse are comparable to opioid misuse. In addition, kratom misuse can also result in psychosis (a mental disorder in which one’s thoughts and emotions are so out of control that one loses touch with reality).

Is Kratom an Opioid - Eleanor Health

The Legality of Kratom in the United States

In August 2016, the DEA attempted to designate kratom as a Schedule I medication (a medication or substance with a high potential for misuse or addiction with no FDA-approved medicinal purpose). This attempt was due to the adverse side effects and dependence caused by kratom. However, due to public backlash; it remains legal in America except for the following states:

Although kratom isn’t illegal, there are restrictions imposed. At the moment, kratom cannot be lawfully advertised as an effective treatment for any medical condition.

In recent years, there has been substantial debate in the U.S. concerning the safety of kratom use. Although it’s not currently categorized as a controlled substance under the Controlled Substances Act, the DEA categorizes kratom as a “medication of concern.”

Is Kratom a Safe Substitute For Opioids?

Kratom is essentially a medicinal plant with opioid properties. Although kratom is not chemically identical to opioids, the two chemicals of kratom (mitragynine and 7-α-hydroxy mitragynine) interact with opioid receptors in the brain. This interaction is the reasoning as to why the FDA classified kratom as an opioid. While kratom generates opioid-like effects such as pain relief, drowsiness, and intoxication, it also possesses the risk of tolerance, dependence, and addiction.

There is currently insufficient evidence to verify or disprove that kratom use is safe. However, there are indications that kratom products are highly likely to be tainted with other substances that aren’t safe in and of themselves. In addition, product information like recommended dose is, at best, somewhat hazy. While it’s clear that low dosages have a stimulant effect on the user and high doses have a sedative impact, long-term use can cause withdrawal symptoms and side effects similar to opioids.

As with most opioids and recreational substances, it’s possible to overdose on kratom. The treatment for kratom overdose is the same as that of opioid overdose with similar complications. And more clinical trials are required to better define its benefits, if any, as a therapeutic medication. Therefore, individuals who self-medicate with kratom should be aware of the risks associated with its consumption. Especially those who have developed a tolerance to opioids or kratom, as they are more prone to experience an accidental overdose.

However, kratom does show some potential as a medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD), like methadone or buprenorphine. But since it has not been studied thoroughly, this claim is not clinically confirmed.

Why Is Kratom Popular

At present, methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone are the only FDA-approved medications for treating opioid use disorder. Even though the FDA has outlawed the use of kratom as a dietary supplement, it’s still freely available and far cheaper than buprenorphine. However, it’s vital to note that there is no evidence to demonstrate kratom as a safe alternative for opioid use disorder at this time.

The first indications of kratom being used to treat OUD date back to 1836. Reported benefits include analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects. Recreational use of kratom has grown extensively across Europe and the United States because of easy access via the internet and because kratom’s main alkaloid component, “mitragynine,” is not yet classified as a controlled substance (unlike its derivative 7-α-hydroxy mitragynine, which is a controlled substance in several countries outside the United States).

Given the widespread kratom use and its popularity on social media, practitioners must be educated and contribute to clinical evidence. At the same time, health care providers and consumers are encouraged to report any adverse outcomes to the FDA MedWatch program while the FDA continues to examine the potential for misuse and effects of kratom.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Is Kratom an Opioid? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" } ["summary"]=> string(187) "

The post Is Kratom an Opioid? appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(14550) "

Originally Posted On: Is Kratom an Opioid?

 

Is Kratom an Opioid - Eleanor Health

Plant-based compounds have been used throughout human history, whether for pain relief or as part of religious ceremonies. Emerging from the shadows of the current opioid epidemic is kratom, a plant leaf extract used to manage chronic pain and fatigue in Southeast Asian countries for centuries and is believed to have a similar mechanism of action to opioids.

Kratom’s use has garnered considerable attention in the U.S., and it’s now listed as a “medication of concern” by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Although kratom is allowed at the federal level, it’s prohibited in certain states. Additionally, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has imposed several restrictions on kratom, including import restrictions. Yet certain people who take kratom seem to highly recommend it, claiming that it has helped them manage their pain and opioid withdrawal.

Natural plant compounds will undoubtedly continue to play an important role as sources of therapeutic agents. However, as of 2021, federal regulation will stay on hold as the debate over kratom continues. In addition, the FDA has issued warnings to companies that sell kratom in the United States or illegally market kratom as a herbal supplement to treat addiction, anxiety, pain, and other health conditions, as only FDA-approved medications are allowed to make such claims. As such, the future legal status of kratom is yet to be seen.

So is kratom an opioid? While kratom and opioids are two different substances, the FDA classifies kratom as an opioid. Before we go into the reasoning behind this classification, let’s take a closer look at kratom.

What Is Kratom?

Kratom is a tropical tree indigenous to Southeast Asia and certain parts of Africa, with a long history of medical and ceremonial use. Traditionally kratom was consumed in its natural form to reduce fatigue. However, various forms can now be found, including dried or crushed leaves, capsules, tablets, liquids, and resin. Kratom leaves induce stimulating effects at low doses and sedative effects at high doses.

In the United States, kratom is most typically sold as a dietary or nutritional supplement or under the radar in tobacco or head shops. And it is a substance that is fast becoming a popular alternative therapy and the substance of choice on the recreational market in the U.S.

How Does Kratom Work?

The two main compounds in kratom leaves (mitragynine and 7-α-hydroxy mitragynine) interact with opioid receptors in the brain. As a result, these chemicals generate sedative effects when consumed in large doses and stimulating effects in lower doses. Doctors believe that kratom binds to the same regions of the nerve cell as opioid medicines, thus causing similar effects in the brain. However, there are still insufficient clinical trials and studies to understand the long-term health implications and precise function of kratom.

According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the compound 7-hydroxy mitragynine is about 13 times stronger than morphine. As a result, these compounds cross the blood-brain barrier at a much faster rate. There are currently 25 compounds identified in kratom, and one such compound contributes to the psychoactive effects of kratom.

Kratom Effects

Kratom in low doses can induce increased energy, sociability, and alertness. However, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), kratom can also cause uncomfortable mental and physical health effects such as:

Additionally, kratom can also cause “intoxication,” similar to the effects of opioid misuse. The interaction of kratom with opioid receptors in the brain is compared to how morphine interacts with the brain. Opioid medications attach to opioid receptors, causing a rush of neurotransmitters, or chemical messengers, in the brain, which helps regulate mood and influence decision-making. When the levels of these neurotransmitters in the brain are elevated, it helps improve mood.

The symptoms of kratom misuse are comparable to opioid misuse. In addition, kratom misuse can also result in psychosis (a mental disorder in which one’s thoughts and emotions are so out of control that one loses touch with reality).

Is Kratom an Opioid - Eleanor Health

The Legality of Kratom in the United States

In August 2016, the DEA attempted to designate kratom as a Schedule I medication (a medication or substance with a high potential for misuse or addiction with no FDA-approved medicinal purpose). This attempt was due to the adverse side effects and dependence caused by kratom. However, due to public backlash; it remains legal in America except for the following states:

Although kratom isn’t illegal, there are restrictions imposed. At the moment, kratom cannot be lawfully advertised as an effective treatment for any medical condition.

In recent years, there has been substantial debate in the U.S. concerning the safety of kratom use. Although it’s not currently categorized as a controlled substance under the Controlled Substances Act, the DEA categorizes kratom as a “medication of concern.”

Is Kratom a Safe Substitute For Opioids?

Kratom is essentially a medicinal plant with opioid properties. Although kratom is not chemically identical to opioids, the two chemicals of kratom (mitragynine and 7-α-hydroxy mitragynine) interact with opioid receptors in the brain. This interaction is the reasoning as to why the FDA classified kratom as an opioid. While kratom generates opioid-like effects such as pain relief, drowsiness, and intoxication, it also possesses the risk of tolerance, dependence, and addiction.

There is currently insufficient evidence to verify or disprove that kratom use is safe. However, there are indications that kratom products are highly likely to be tainted with other substances that aren’t safe in and of themselves. In addition, product information like recommended dose is, at best, somewhat hazy. While it’s clear that low dosages have a stimulant effect on the user and high doses have a sedative impact, long-term use can cause withdrawal symptoms and side effects similar to opioids.

As with most opioids and recreational substances, it’s possible to overdose on kratom. The treatment for kratom overdose is the same as that of opioid overdose with similar complications. And more clinical trials are required to better define its benefits, if any, as a therapeutic medication. Therefore, individuals who self-medicate with kratom should be aware of the risks associated with its consumption. Especially those who have developed a tolerance to opioids or kratom, as they are more prone to experience an accidental overdose.

However, kratom does show some potential as a medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD), like methadone or buprenorphine. But since it has not been studied thoroughly, this claim is not clinically confirmed.

Why Is Kratom Popular

At present, methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone are the only FDA-approved medications for treating opioid use disorder. Even though the FDA has outlawed the use of kratom as a dietary supplement, it’s still freely available and far cheaper than buprenorphine. However, it’s vital to note that there is no evidence to demonstrate kratom as a safe alternative for opioid use disorder at this time.

The first indications of kratom being used to treat OUD date back to 1836. Reported benefits include analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects. Recreational use of kratom has grown extensively across Europe and the United States because of easy access via the internet and because kratom’s main alkaloid component, “mitragynine,” is not yet classified as a controlled substance (unlike its derivative 7-α-hydroxy mitragynine, which is a controlled substance in several countries outside the United States).

Given the widespread kratom use and its popularity on social media, practitioners must be educated and contribute to clinical evidence. At the same time, health care providers and consumers are encouraged to report any adverse outcomes to the FDA MedWatch program while the FDA continues to examine the potential for misuse and effects of kratom.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Is Kratom an Opioid? appeared first on Syndication Site.

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The post How Long Do Suboxone Withdrawals Last appeared first on Syndication Site.

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Originally Posted On: How Long Do Suboxone Withdrawals Last

How Long Do Suboxone Withdrawals Last?

Medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD) are increasingly utilized to combat the opioid crisis. The growing awareness of their use and effectiveness in addiction maintenance treatment has turned them into an important component to combat the alarming rate of opioid-related overdose and deaths. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), nearly 50,000 Americans died from an opioid overdose in 2019.

MOUDs are used in different treatment stages and are usually complemented with behavioral therapies and counseling sessions to provide a more whole-person approach to treatment. And one of the medications utilized in opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment is Suboxone.

Suboxone is a prescription medication that contains buprenorphine and naloxone as its primary ingredients. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), buprenorphine is a partial opioid that blocks opioid receptors and decreases cravings. And the second active ingredient, naloxone, helps counteract the effects of opioids and minimize the risk of misuse. In addition, both compounds work together to eliminate the symptoms of withdrawal associated with OUD.

Suboxone in Opioid Use Disorder Treatment

Buprenorphine and naloxone are opioid-based medications that aren’t as addictive as heroin or prescription painkillers. Instead, Suboxone tricks the brain into thinking it’s getting the opioids it craves, and in turn, satisfying the physical dependence on opioids. This feature aids in the successful management of opioid withdrawal symptoms during recovery.

Suboxone for OUD treatment is generally prescribed during the onset of acute opioid withdrawals to prevent the risk of precipitated withdrawals (the sudden occurrence of intense withdrawal symptoms). The duration of Suboxone treatment is determined by the specific needs and requirements of each individual. Suboxone maintenance programs provide a long-term treatment option for opioid use disorder.

The half-life of the opioid being misused determines when Suboxone treatment begins. For example, OxyContin and heroin have a short half-life and leave the body in a couple of hours. Suboxone is therefore prescribed at least 12 hours after the last dose of short-acting opiates and at least 24 hours after the last dose of long-acting opioids.

Suboxone is used in MOUD treatment to help people wean off opioids and avoid inpatient detoxification. Suboxone’s key advantages are as follows:

While Suboxone is an effective MOUD treatment, its prolonged use can lead to the development of dependence. In addition, Suboxone, as a partial opioid medication, can cause similar withdrawal symptoms to other opioids during abrupt cessation. Hence, individuals in Suboxone treatment are gradually tapered off the medication towards the end of their treatment to reduce the risk of Suboxone withdrawals.

Suboxone Withdrawal Symptoms

Suboxone, like all opioids, can cause physical dependence when used for a prolonged period, even when taken as prescribed. Although the buprenorphine in Suboxone does not activate opioid receptors to the same extent as most potent opioid medications, it still blocks them to reduce cravings for other opioids. And as a result, cause withdrawal symptoms during abrupt cessation of Suboxone. This reaction is caused by the sudden absence of the medication, inducing a chemical imbalance in the body and triggering distressing effects. However, Suboxone withdrawal is relatively less intense than other opioid withdrawals.

Suboxone withdrawal symptoms include:

Individuals on Suboxone treatment should seek the advice of their treatment provider before quitting the medication. As abrupt cessation of Suboxone could lead to opioid withdrawal symptoms and increase the chances of a relapse.

Suboxone Withdrawal Timeline

Suboxone is a long-acting opioid with a half-life of 24-60 hours. Hence, symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal do not set in as quickly as other opioids, and withdrawals generally last longer. Certain factors determine the duration of Suboxone withdrawal, including if the medication is gradually tapered down or quit cold turkey.

Suboxone withdrawal generally follows the following timeline:

Day 1-3: Withdrawal symptoms may begin within 6-12 hours since the last Suboxone dose. Early symptoms include anxiety, fatigue, and general discomfort. Suboxone withdrawals may then peak within the first 72 hours and include symptoms such as fever, body aches, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Days 4-7: Symptoms begin to reduce in intensity and gradually subside within this period. Most of the symptoms subside by the end of the first week. However, individuals may begin to experience some of the psychological symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal, such as anxiety and irritability during this period.

Weeks 2-4: During this period, individuals are more susceptible to psychological withdrawal symptoms such as depression. Symptoms such as anxiety and cravings can also continue long after the acute withdrawal phase.

Months: Depression and cravings are likely to persist after a month. In some cases, opioid cravings can appear years after an individual has stopped using the medication. Therefore, improving relapse prevention skills is crucial to stop individuals from using the medication again.

How Long Do Suboxone Withdrawals Last - Eleanor Health

How Long Does Suboxone Withdrawal Last?

Suboxone withdrawals generally occur within 24 hours of the last dose, peak within 72 hours, and last for approximately a month. The physical symptoms subside within about a week, while the psychological symptoms such as depression and cravings can linger for longer. However, the severity and duration of Suboxone withdrawal may vary from person to person based on factors such as:

One strategy to lessen the severity of withdrawal symptoms is to taper off Suboxone gradually. If you wish to stop using Suboxone, consult your healthcare practitioner first.

How to Manage Suboxone Withdrawal?

Tapering down Suboxone doses under the guidance of a treatment provider is generally the recommended method to quit Suboxone treatment without experiencing significant withdrawal symptoms. Since the body has been accustomed to functioning with Suboxone over a long period, utilizing a tapering program can help the body gradually adjust to functioning without Suboxone and minimize the severity of withdrawal symptoms.

Some people may experience unpleasant withdrawal symptoms even during a tapering program. During such instances, medical treatment at a Suboxone detox facility is recommended.

In addition to utilizing a tapering down program or medication-assisted detox program, people can also follow these simple day-to-day habits to manage Suboxone withdrawal:

Although the risk of withdrawal when using Suboxone as a MOUD treatment is a cause for concern, it’s still an effective treatment choice for helping people with OUD achieve and maintain long-term sobriety.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post How Long Do Suboxone Withdrawals Last appeared first on Syndication Site.

" } ["summary"]=> string(205) "

The post How Long Do Suboxone Withdrawals Last appeared first on Syndication Site.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(13980) "

Originally Posted On: How Long Do Suboxone Withdrawals Last

How Long Do Suboxone Withdrawals Last?

Medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD) are increasingly utilized to combat the opioid crisis. The growing awareness of their use and effectiveness in addiction maintenance treatment has turned them into an important component to combat the alarming rate of opioid-related overdose and deaths. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), nearly 50,000 Americans died from an opioid overdose in 2019.

MOUDs are used in different treatment stages and are usually complemented with behavioral therapies and counseling sessions to provide a more whole-person approach to treatment. And one of the medications utilized in opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment is Suboxone.

Suboxone is a prescription medication that contains buprenorphine and naloxone as its primary ingredients. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), buprenorphine is a partial opioid that blocks opioid receptors and decreases cravings. And the second active ingredient, naloxone, helps counteract the effects of opioids and minimize the risk of misuse. In addition, both compounds work together to eliminate the symptoms of withdrawal associated with OUD.

Suboxone in Opioid Use Disorder Treatment

Buprenorphine and naloxone are opioid-based medications that aren’t as addictive as heroin or prescription painkillers. Instead, Suboxone tricks the brain into thinking it’s getting the opioids it craves, and in turn, satisfying the physical dependence on opioids. This feature aids in the successful management of opioid withdrawal symptoms during recovery.

Suboxone for OUD treatment is generally prescribed during the onset of acute opioid withdrawals to prevent the risk of precipitated withdrawals (the sudden occurrence of intense withdrawal symptoms). The duration of Suboxone treatment is determined by the specific needs and requirements of each individual. Suboxone maintenance programs provide a long-term treatment option for opioid use disorder.

The half-life of the opioid being misused determines when Suboxone treatment begins. For example, OxyContin and heroin have a short half-life and leave the body in a couple of hours. Suboxone is therefore prescribed at least 12 hours after the last dose of short-acting opiates and at least 24 hours after the last dose of long-acting opioids.

Suboxone is used in MOUD treatment to help people wean off opioids and avoid inpatient detoxification. Suboxone’s key advantages are as follows:

While Suboxone is an effective MOUD treatment, its prolonged use can lead to the development of dependence. In addition, Suboxone, as a partial opioid medication, can cause similar withdrawal symptoms to other opioids during abrupt cessation. Hence, individuals in Suboxone treatment are gradually tapered off the medication towards the end of their treatment to reduce the risk of Suboxone withdrawals.

Suboxone Withdrawal Symptoms

Suboxone, like all opioids, can cause physical dependence when used for a prolonged period, even when taken as prescribed. Although the buprenorphine in Suboxone does not activate opioid receptors to the same extent as most potent opioid medications, it still blocks them to reduce cravings for other opioids. And as a result, cause withdrawal symptoms during abrupt cessation of Suboxone. This reaction is caused by the sudden absence of the medication, inducing a chemical imbalance in the body and triggering distressing effects. However, Suboxone withdrawal is relatively less intense than other opioid withdrawals.

Suboxone withdrawal symptoms include:

Individuals on Suboxone treatment should seek the advice of their treatment provider before quitting the medication. As abrupt cessation of Suboxone could lead to opioid withdrawal symptoms and increase the chances of a relapse.

Suboxone Withdrawal Timeline

Suboxone is a long-acting opioid with a half-life of 24-60 hours. Hence, symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal do not set in as quickly as other opioids, and withdrawals generally last longer. Certain factors determine the duration of Suboxone withdrawal, including if the medication is gradually tapered down or quit cold turkey.

Suboxone withdrawal generally follows the following timeline:

Day 1-3: Withdrawal symptoms may begin within 6-12 hours since the last Suboxone dose. Early symptoms include anxiety, fatigue, and general discomfort. Suboxone withdrawals may then peak within the first 72 hours and include symptoms such as fever, body aches, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Days 4-7: Symptoms begin to reduce in intensity and gradually subside within this period. Most of the symptoms subside by the end of the first week. However, individuals may begin to experience some of the psychological symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal, such as anxiety and irritability during this period.

Weeks 2-4: During this period, individuals are more susceptible to psychological withdrawal symptoms such as depression. Symptoms such as anxiety and cravings can also continue long after the acute withdrawal phase.

Months: Depression and cravings are likely to persist after a month. In some cases, opioid cravings can appear years after an individual has stopped using the medication. Therefore, improving relapse prevention skills is crucial to stop individuals from using the medication again.

How Long Do Suboxone Withdrawals Last - Eleanor Health

How Long Does Suboxone Withdrawal Last?

Suboxone withdrawals generally occur within 24 hours of the last dose, peak within 72 hours, and last for approximately a month. The physical symptoms subside within about a week, while the psychological symptoms such as depression and cravings can linger for longer. However, the severity and duration of Suboxone withdrawal may vary from person to person based on factors such as:

One strategy to lessen the severity of withdrawal symptoms is to taper off Suboxone gradually. If you wish to stop using Suboxone, consult your healthcare practitioner first.

How to Manage Suboxone Withdrawal?

Tapering down Suboxone doses under the guidance of a treatment provider is generally the recommended method to quit Suboxone treatment without experiencing significant withdrawal symptoms. Since the body has been accustomed to functioning with Suboxone over a long period, utilizing a tapering program can help the body gradually adjust to functioning without Suboxone and minimize the severity of withdrawal symptoms.

Some people may experience unpleasant withdrawal symptoms even during a tapering program. During such instances, medical treatment at a Suboxone detox facility is recommended.

In addition to utilizing a tapering down program or medication-assisted detox program, people can also follow these simple day-to-day habits to manage Suboxone withdrawal:

Although the risk of withdrawal when using Suboxone as a MOUD treatment is a cause for concern, it’s still an effective treatment choice for helping people with OUD achieve and maintain long-term sobriety.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post How Long Do Suboxone Withdrawals Last appeared first on Syndication Site.

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The post Naltrexone for Alcohol appeared first on Syndication Site.

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Originally Posted On: Naltrexone for Alcohol

Naltrexone for Alcohol

Alcohol use disorder (AUD) remains a major health concern in the U.S. and worldwide. The number of individuals with AUD has steadily increased throughout recent years, especially during the recent Covid-19 outbreak. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 13% of Americans admitted to starting or increasing substance use as a means to cope with the stress and isolation that was prevalent during the pandemic.

The increase in the harmful use of alcohol has forced federal governments worldwide to reinforce various measures and policies to control alcohol consumption, including the regulations on marketing alcoholic beverages and their availability. However, the most significant of all is the steps taken to educate the public on AUD and address the stigma associated with addiction. And subsequently, pave the way for more people to seek treatment.

Treatment for AUD generally includes a combination of medications, evidence-based behavioral therapy, and counseling to help address both the physical and psychological components of addiction. There are currently three medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help people achieve long-term sobriety by managing withdrawal symptoms and reducing the risk of relapse. One such approved medication for alcohol use disorder (MAUD) is naltrexone.

What Is Naltrexone?

Naltrexone, sold under the brand names: Vivitrol, Depade, and ReVia, is a prescription medication used to treat alcohol use disorders and opioid use disorders (OUDs). Naltrexone is available as a pill (Depade and ReVia) and injectable (Vivitrol) and is developed to help reduce and suppress cravings for alcohol and opioids. Naltrexone is relatively pure and long-lasting and can be prescribed by any practitioner licensed to prescribe medications.

Naltrexone is a non-addictive and non-narcotic medication with a low risk of misuse. However, since naltrexone tends to create serious withdrawal symptoms in individuals with opioids in their system, it can only be prescribed to people who haven’t taken opioids for 7-14 days before naltrexone treatment. This includes those who have used methadone in the past and are switching to naltrexone. Those who are still currently using alcohol, on the other hand, can be prescribed naltrexone.

A Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) is required for the long-acting injectable formulation of naltrexone (Vivitrol) to ensure that the benefits of the medication outweigh its risks. The pill form is prescribed daily, but the extended-release injectable formulation is administered once a month.

How Does Naltrexone Work?

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), naltrexone works by blocking the intoxicating and sedative effects of opioids such as codeine, heroin, and morphine. It binds to the opioid receptors in the brain to block the effects of opioids and reduce cravings; however, as a MAUD, naltrexone functions by blocking the endorphin receptors in the body to suppress the effects of drinking. This function reduces alcohol cravings and helps individuals in recovery gradually reduce their alcohol intake.

Unlike methadone or buprenorphine, naltrexone does not activate opioid receptors during treatment. Hence, it’s considered a relatively safe medication for AUD and OUD. However, it is crucial to remember that naltrexone is not a complete cure for AUD or OUD. Instead, it’s simply a single component in a comprehensive treatment plan that includes counseling, behavioral therapies, and aftercare programs.

How Is Naltrexone Prescribed?

Naltrexone dosage is determined by each individual’s medical condition and reaction to treatment. Therefore, the doctor may start naltrexone treatment with a lower dosage and monitor the person for any serious side effects before increasing their dose.

Naltrexone pills are prescribed in 50 milligrams to be taken once daily. The injectable form of naltrexone (Vivitrol) is administered once a month in 380-mg doses by a healthcare provider. Naltrexone takes effect within 30 minutes after its use. Missing naltrexone doses can reduce its effectiveness and raise the risk of relapse. Naltrexone is not recommended for anyone under the age of 18 or those suffering from certain medical conditions.

Side Effects of Naltrexone

Similar to many medications, naltrexone has the potential to cause unpleasant side effects. However, the majority of these negative effects are mild and fade away with time.

The following are the more common side effects of naltrexone:

If the side effects persist or worsen, it’s vital to speak with your doctor before stopping the medication. Your doctor can help you by changing your dosage or prescribing an alternative medication.

Some of the less common and severe side effects of naltrexone include:

Seek immediate medical attention if you experience any of the following symptoms.

Naltrexone for Alcohol - Eleanor Health

Naltrexone for Alcohol Use Disorder

Alcohol use disorder is a chronic, relapsing brain disease characterized by the compulsive use of alcohol despite adverse consequences. Naltrexone, as a MAUD, reduces an individual’s motivation to continue drinking. Furthermore, naltrexone has been shown to minimize drinking days in individuals with an AUD and benefit those who struggle with abstinence. Naltrexone functions by:

One of the most significant benefits of utilizing naltrexone is that it has no potential for misuse, addiction, or dependence. Naltrexone aids in the maintenance of sobriety while helping individuals in recovery focus on other areas of treatment.

The duration of naltrexone treatment can vary from one person to another depending on individual requirements and conditions. Naltrexone treatment can last anywhere between 12 weeks to 12 months. Long-term use of naltrexone has not been linked to any concerns thus far.

Naltrexone is generally prescribed after the individuals have ceased alcohol consumption or completed alcohol detoxification. However, individuals actively consuming alcohol can also take naltrexone for treatment.

Despite being a relatively safe medication, naltrexone may not be effective for everyone with an alcohol use disorder. Hence it’s vital to consult a physician or addiction specialist to determine the best treatment option for your alcohol use disorder.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Naltrexone for Alcohol appeared first on Syndication Site.

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The post Naltrexone for Alcohol appeared first on Syndication Site.

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Originally Posted On: Naltrexone for Alcohol

Naltrexone for Alcohol

Alcohol use disorder (AUD) remains a major health concern in the U.S. and worldwide. The number of individuals with AUD has steadily increased throughout recent years, especially during the recent Covid-19 outbreak. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 13% of Americans admitted to starting or increasing substance use as a means to cope with the stress and isolation that was prevalent during the pandemic.

The increase in the harmful use of alcohol has forced federal governments worldwide to reinforce various measures and policies to control alcohol consumption, including the regulations on marketing alcoholic beverages and their availability. However, the most significant of all is the steps taken to educate the public on AUD and address the stigma associated with addiction. And subsequently, pave the way for more people to seek treatment.

Treatment for AUD generally includes a combination of medications, evidence-based behavioral therapy, and counseling to help address both the physical and psychological components of addiction. There are currently three medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help people achieve long-term sobriety by managing withdrawal symptoms and reducing the risk of relapse. One such approved medication for alcohol use disorder (MAUD) is naltrexone.

What Is Naltrexone?

Naltrexone, sold under the brand names: Vivitrol, Depade, and ReVia, is a prescription medication used to treat alcohol use disorders and opioid use disorders (OUDs). Naltrexone is available as a pill (Depade and ReVia) and injectable (Vivitrol) and is developed to help reduce and suppress cravings for alcohol and opioids. Naltrexone is relatively pure and long-lasting and can be prescribed by any practitioner licensed to prescribe medications.

Naltrexone is a non-addictive and non-narcotic medication with a low risk of misuse. However, since naltrexone tends to create serious withdrawal symptoms in individuals with opioids in their system, it can only be prescribed to people who haven’t taken opioids for 7-14 days before naltrexone treatment. This includes those who have used methadone in the past and are switching to naltrexone. Those who are still currently using alcohol, on the other hand, can be prescribed naltrexone.

A Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) is required for the long-acting injectable formulation of naltrexone (Vivitrol) to ensure that the benefits of the medication outweigh its risks. The pill form is prescribed daily, but the extended-release injectable formulation is administered once a month.

How Does Naltrexone Work?

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), naltrexone works by blocking the intoxicating and sedative effects of opioids such as codeine, heroin, and morphine. It binds to the opioid receptors in the brain to block the effects of opioids and reduce cravings; however, as a MAUD, naltrexone functions by blocking the endorphin receptors in the body to suppress the effects of drinking. This function reduces alcohol cravings and helps individuals in recovery gradually reduce their alcohol intake.

Unlike methadone or buprenorphine, naltrexone does not activate opioid receptors during treatment. Hence, it’s considered a relatively safe medication for AUD and OUD. However, it is crucial to remember that naltrexone is not a complete cure for AUD or OUD. Instead, it’s simply a single component in a comprehensive treatment plan that includes counseling, behavioral therapies, and aftercare programs.

How Is Naltrexone Prescribed?

Naltrexone dosage is determined by each individual’s medical condition and reaction to treatment. Therefore, the doctor may start naltrexone treatment with a lower dosage and monitor the person for any serious side effects before increasing their dose.

Naltrexone pills are prescribed in 50 milligrams to be taken once daily. The injectable form of naltrexone (Vivitrol) is administered once a month in 380-mg doses by a healthcare provider. Naltrexone takes effect within 30 minutes after its use. Missing naltrexone doses can reduce its effectiveness and raise the risk of relapse. Naltrexone is not recommended for anyone under the age of 18 or those suffering from certain medical conditions.

Side Effects of Naltrexone

Similar to many medications, naltrexone has the potential to cause unpleasant side effects. However, the majority of these negative effects are mild and fade away with time.

The following are the more common side effects of naltrexone:

If the side effects persist or worsen, it’s vital to speak with your doctor before stopping the medication. Your doctor can help you by changing your dosage or prescribing an alternative medication.

Some of the less common and severe side effects of naltrexone include:

Seek immediate medical attention if you experience any of the following symptoms.

Naltrexone for Alcohol - Eleanor Health

Naltrexone for Alcohol Use Disorder

Alcohol use disorder is a chronic, relapsing brain disease characterized by the compulsive use of alcohol despite adverse consequences. Naltrexone, as a MAUD, reduces an individual’s motivation to continue drinking. Furthermore, naltrexone has been shown to minimize drinking days in individuals with an AUD and benefit those who struggle with abstinence. Naltrexone functions by:

One of the most significant benefits of utilizing naltrexone is that it has no potential for misuse, addiction, or dependence. Naltrexone aids in the maintenance of sobriety while helping individuals in recovery focus on other areas of treatment.

The duration of naltrexone treatment can vary from one person to another depending on individual requirements and conditions. Naltrexone treatment can last anywhere between 12 weeks to 12 months. Long-term use of naltrexone has not been linked to any concerns thus far.

Naltrexone is generally prescribed after the individuals have ceased alcohol consumption or completed alcohol detoxification. However, individuals actively consuming alcohol can also take naltrexone for treatment.

Despite being a relatively safe medication, naltrexone may not be effective for everyone with an alcohol use disorder. Hence it’s vital to consult a physician or addiction specialist to determine the best treatment option for your alcohol use disorder.

If you are seeking help with your loved one’s addiction, contact us today or complete our quick contact form below, to speak with an addiction treatment specialist.

If you need help with your substance use disorder, we are here to help you build your confidence and momentum towards the future you want. We provide treatment services for adults with alcohol, opioid, and other substance use disorders. We are currently located in Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, and Washington.

The post Naltrexone for Alcohol appeared first on Syndication Site.

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