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twelve days after the volcanic eruption, inhabitants of the Tonga islands testify
?Epidemics can never be reduced to biological causes?
France?s energy independence thanks to nuclear power? A statistical sleight of hand and 100% import
the struggle of agricultural workers in Nicaragua taken to French justice
clashes between demonstrators and police in Brussels
Peru declares ?environmental emergency? after oil spill
BA.2, the sub-variant that raises new questions
Europe still divided on its ranking of sustainable activities
Singer Adele forced to postpone her series of concerts in Las Vegas at the last moment
relief for cultural professionals after Jean Castex?s announcements

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                    [title] => twelve days after the volcanic eruption, inhabitants of the Tonga islands testify
                    [link] => https://movs.world/planet/twelve-days-after-the-volcanic-eruption-inhabitants-of-the-tonga-islands-testify/
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                            [creator] => Susan Hally
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                    [pubdate] => Thu, 27 Jan 2022 14:50:27 +0000
                    [category] => PlanetdayseruptioninhabitantsIslandstestifyTongatwelvevolcanic
                    [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/twelve-days-after-the-volcanic-eruption-inhabitants-of-the-tonga-islands-testify/
                    [description] => In total, according to the authorities, 85% of the population of this country of just over 100,000 people was affected by the volcanic eruption or the tsunami that followed. PETTY OFFICER CHRIS WEISSENBORN / AFP It is sometimes necessary to dial their number more than ten times before finally hearing their voices. Chopped. Deaf. Distant. ... Read more
                    [content] => Array
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                            [encoded] => 

It is sometimes necessary to dial their number more than ten times before finally hearing their voices. Chopped. Deaf. Distant. On January 15, when the violent eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano caused a tsunami on the Tonga Islands, the submarine cable connecting the Polynesian archipelago to the rest of the world was damaged, instantly interrupting all telephone communications and Internet. After five days of almost total silence, the operator Digicel was able to partially restore its telephone network. Since then, connections have remained fragile and erratic, but they allow more and more Tongans to bear witness to the drama they have experienced.

All their stories begin with the terrifying sound of explosions. ?There were several, growing louder and louder, to the point of leaving us half deaf, says Marian Kupu, journalist. We immediately understood that something serious was happening, that we had to run, take shelter. » Outside, rolls are already forming on the ocean, which suddenly changes its appearance. The young woman, who lives in a village on the seafront a few kilometers from the capital, Nuku’alofa, jumps into a car to get away from the coast as quickly as possible with her family. Like her, a whole country is moving inland in a gigantic traffic jam.

Polluted water, destroyed crops

?That’s when the sky turned black and it started to rain. Not water, but ashes, pebbles. It was apocalyptic. We couldn’t see anything through our windshield.” says in turn Tulutulu Mafuaiolotele, a former policeman. With his wife, his son, his cousins, nephews and nieces, he manages to find refuge with his in-laws. There, without electricity, without a telephone, he clings like a lifeline to the 90FM radio, which will never stop broadcasting. ?This is the only information that reached us. Luckily they were there. They are the ones who immediately warned us of the risk of a tsunami. » At the seaside, not everyone had time to flee. Some had no choice but to climb trees to escape the waves that reached up to 15 meters high. Miraculously, there were only three deaths.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The Tonga islands still cut off from the world, three days after the volcanic eruption

?We didn’t immediately realize the extent of the damage. It wasn’t until two days later, when we finally decided to go home, that we realized. Everything was covered in a thick mantle of ash, even the animals. Above all, the landscape was upside down: there were electric poles on the ground, uprooted coconut trees, houses on the wrong side of the road. Since then, we spend our time cleaning up,? testifies again Marian Kupu, who, for more than twenty-four hours, remained caulked at her brother-in-law’s house, not daring to go out, terrified at the idea of ??inhaling this gray rain which never stopped falling.

You have 49.71% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

) [summary] => In total, according to the authorities, 85% of the population of this country of just over 100,000 people was affected by the volcanic eruption or the tsunami that followed. PETTY OFFICER CHRIS WEISSENBORN / AFP It is sometimes necessary to dial their number more than ten times before finally hearing their voices. Chopped. Deaf. Distant. ... Read more [atom_content] =>

It is sometimes necessary to dial their number more than ten times before finally hearing their voices. Chopped. Deaf. Distant. On January 15, when the violent eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano caused a tsunami on the Tonga Islands, the submarine cable connecting the Polynesian archipelago to the rest of the world was damaged, instantly interrupting all telephone communications and Internet. After five days of almost total silence, the operator Digicel was able to partially restore its telephone network. Since then, connections have remained fragile and erratic, but they allow more and more Tongans to bear witness to the drama they have experienced.

All their stories begin with the terrifying sound of explosions. ?There were several, growing louder and louder, to the point of leaving us half deaf, says Marian Kupu, journalist. We immediately understood that something serious was happening, that we had to run, take shelter. » Outside, rolls are already forming on the ocean, which suddenly changes its appearance. The young woman, who lives in a village on the seafront a few kilometers from the capital, Nuku’alofa, jumps into a car to get away from the coast as quickly as possible with her family. Like her, a whole country is moving inland in a gigantic traffic jam.

Polluted water, destroyed crops

?That’s when the sky turned black and it started to rain. Not water, but ashes, pebbles. It was apocalyptic. We couldn’t see anything through our windshield.” says in turn Tulutulu Mafuaiolotele, a former policeman. With his wife, his son, his cousins, nephews and nieces, he manages to find refuge with his in-laws. There, without electricity, without a telephone, he clings like a lifeline to the 90FM radio, which will never stop broadcasting. ?This is the only information that reached us. Luckily they were there. They are the ones who immediately warned us of the risk of a tsunami. » At the seaside, not everyone had time to flee. Some had no choice but to climb trees to escape the waves that reached up to 15 meters high. Miraculously, there were only three deaths.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The Tonga islands still cut off from the world, three days after the volcanic eruption

?We didn’t immediately realize the extent of the damage. It wasn’t until two days later, when we finally decided to go home, that we realized. Everything was covered in a thick mantle of ash, even the animals. Above all, the landscape was upside down: there were electric poles on the ground, uprooted coconut trees, houses on the wrong side of the road. Since then, we spend our time cleaning up,? testifies again Marian Kupu, who, for more than twenty-four hours, remained caulked at her brother-in-law’s house, not daring to go out, terrified at the idea of ??inhaling this gray rain which never stopped falling.

You have 49.71% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

[date_timestamp] => 1643295027 ) [1] => Array ( [title] => ?Epidemics can never be reduced to biological causes? [link] => https://movs.world/planet/epidemics-can-never-be-reduced-to-biological-causes/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Tue, 25 Jan 2022 02:44:59 +0000 [category] => Planetbiologicalepidemicsreduced [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/epidemics-can-never-be-reduced-to-biological-causes/ [description] => Lecturer in the history of medicine and health at the University of Strasbourg, Frédéric Vagneron is particularly interested in the history of influenza and that of the relationship between human health and animal health. His current work focuses on the history of European health, the management of deaths in times of pandemic and the role ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

Lecturer in the history of medicine and health at the University of Strasbourg, Frédéric Vagneron is particularly interested in the history of influenza and that of the relationship between human health and animal health. His current work focuses on the history of European health, the management of deaths in times of pandemic and the role of international regulations in the face of the slowdown in innovation on antibiotics. According to him, the Covid-19 pandemic marks a turning point compared to previous epidemics, even if parallels exist with the past, in terms of management or the feelings of the populations.

How does the Covid-19 pandemic differ from past major epidemics?

It is unique, first, by the abundance of data on the disease. We have access to almost instantaneous knowledge of its planetary evolution, for example with the tracking of variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. In this, this pandemic differs from the Spanish flu of 1918-1919, the memory of which has been invoked a lot for two years, for which knowledge remained incomplete over whole sections of territory. To this scientific knowledge is now added information ? or misinformation ? which circulates with unprecedented scale on social networks and in the media.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Back to the Spanish flu: ?We thought we were done with the major epidemics. And boom, 240,000 dead?

Another singularity: this pandemic is developing in an unprecedented globalization of trade, which offers the virus a unique space and speed of proliferation. Echoing this ultra-rapid diffusion, solutions, in particular vaccines, were put in place with unprecedented speed, even though nothing was known about this disease in December 2019.

Is the appearance of a new disease a rare phenomenon?

What seems ?rare? to me is that knowledge about this new disease was built up in an extremely short time. First from knowledge of the virus, its genetic identity card and its spread. Only then, without previous experience with patients, did the doctors draw up the clinical picture of this disease, observed through the very varied damage to the body. It’s a new timeline. Often, throughout history, we faced epidemics of long-known diseases (plague, rabies, smallpox, etc.), but the germ in question was identified much later. Here the process has been reversed. So much so that the disease was named after the identification of the virus. Even for HIV-AIDS, a not so old pandemic, this was not the case: it took several years to determine the viral cause of the disease, in 1983, after the first scattered cases observed in June 1981. Let’s imagine the history of this pandemic if scientists had not identified the virus before 2022! She would have been quite different.

You have 88.91% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

) [summary] => Lecturer in the history of medicine and health at the University of Strasbourg, Frédéric Vagneron is particularly interested in the history of influenza and that of the relationship between human health and animal health. His current work focuses on the history of European health, the management of deaths in times of pandemic and the role ... Read more [atom_content] =>

Lecturer in the history of medicine and health at the University of Strasbourg, Frédéric Vagneron is particularly interested in the history of influenza and that of the relationship between human health and animal health. His current work focuses on the history of European health, the management of deaths in times of pandemic and the role of international regulations in the face of the slowdown in innovation on antibiotics. According to him, the Covid-19 pandemic marks a turning point compared to previous epidemics, even if parallels exist with the past, in terms of management or the feelings of the populations.

How does the Covid-19 pandemic differ from past major epidemics?

It is unique, first, by the abundance of data on the disease. We have access to almost instantaneous knowledge of its planetary evolution, for example with the tracking of variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. In this, this pandemic differs from the Spanish flu of 1918-1919, the memory of which has been invoked a lot for two years, for which knowledge remained incomplete over whole sections of territory. To this scientific knowledge is now added information ? or misinformation ? which circulates with unprecedented scale on social networks and in the media.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Back to the Spanish flu: ?We thought we were done with the major epidemics. And boom, 240,000 dead?

Another singularity: this pandemic is developing in an unprecedented globalization of trade, which offers the virus a unique space and speed of proliferation. Echoing this ultra-rapid diffusion, solutions, in particular vaccines, were put in place with unprecedented speed, even though nothing was known about this disease in December 2019.

Is the appearance of a new disease a rare phenomenon?

What seems ?rare? to me is that knowledge about this new disease was built up in an extremely short time. First from knowledge of the virus, its genetic identity card and its spread. Only then, without previous experience with patients, did the doctors draw up the clinical picture of this disease, observed through the very varied damage to the body. It’s a new timeline. Often, throughout history, we faced epidemics of long-known diseases (plague, rabies, smallpox, etc.), but the germ in question was identified much later. Here the process has been reversed. So much so that the disease was named after the identification of the virus. Even for HIV-AIDS, a not so old pandemic, this was not the case: it took several years to determine the viral cause of the disease, in 1983, after the first scattered cases observed in June 1981. Let’s imagine the history of this pandemic if scientists had not identified the virus before 2022! She would have been quite different.

You have 88.91% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

[date_timestamp] => 1643078699 ) [2] => Array ( [title] => France?s energy independence thanks to nuclear power? A statistical sleight of hand and 100% import [link] => https://movs.world/planet/frances-energy-independence-thanks-to-nuclear-power-a-statistical-sleight-of-hand-and-100-import/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Mon, 24 Jan 2022 16:43:33 +0000 [category] => PlanetenergyFranceshandimportindependencenuclearpowersleightStatistical [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/frances-energy-independence-thanks-to-nuclear-power-a-statistical-sleight-of-hand-and-100-import/ [description] => The Arlit mine in Niger, here in 2005, operated by the French group Orano. PIERRE VERDY / AFP To provide France with a nuclear fleet to reduce its dependence on oil imports, after the oil crisis of 1973, such was the objective of President Valéry Giscard-d’Estaing when he launched a program in 1974 which would ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

To provide France with a nuclear fleet to reduce its dependence on oil imports, after the oil crisis of 1973, such was the objective of President Valéry Giscard-d’Estaing when he launched a program in 1974 which would lead to the construction of 45 nuclear power plants.

The nuclear power plants operated by EDF then produce electricity thanks to the heat emitted by the fission of uranium atoms; a material extracted, imported, enriched and then transformed into fuel by several companies that will be later merged under the name Areva. Energy independence is high, even if not total. French production of natural uranium is at its best, rising from 1,250 tonnes in 1970 to 2,634 tonnes in 1980.

Read also How nuclear is needed in the 2022 presidential campaign

Franco-French uranium mining stops

At the end of the 1990s, the nuclear program slowed down: France stopped building new power plants. In the aftermath, the Franco-French extraction of uranium declines, before stopping completely. Since the early 2000s, the uranium used for French nuclear power plants has been entirely imported, even if it is often then enriched in France, a detail that is important.

However, in its annual report, the Ministry of Ecological Transition states that France’s energy independence stands at 55.3% in 2020 and 53.4% ??in the summer of 2021 according to provisional data. This means that more than half of the energy consumed in France is produced on French soil. But then how do we arrive at this rate, when nuclear represents 70% of the electricity produced, and 100% of the fuel is imported?

An old statistical convention

The answer lies in a “statistical convention” from the statistics manual co-published by the International Energy Agency and by Eurostat, which recommends “counting” as primary energy the heat emitted by the reactor rather than the fuel used to operate it. This convention is old, and goes back “at the time when uranium was produced in France”, explains Bernard Laponche, nuclear physicist and president of the Global Chance association. ?We have since stopped producing it and the French mines have been closed. » The statistical convention remains.

Moreover, in the ?Energy balance sheet of France?, the word ?uranium? appears only twice in 189 pages, in explanatory notes and on the way of producing heat in a power station. In this balance sheet, “we have details on the price of coal, its origin or its calorific value, while we consume very little, laments Mr. Laponche, but we have nothing on uranium, which is nevertheless used to create the heat with which we produce electricity?. As this heat is produced on the hexagonal ground, the uranium is thus naturalized French.

Without this statistical convention, France could only achieve a 10 to 12% rate of energy independence, as the Ministry for Ecological Transition concedes in its energy report:

?In the case of France, which relies entirely on imported fuels (used directly or after recycling), the rate of energy independence would drop around 40 percentage points, to stand at around 12% in 2019, if the he primary energy was considered to be nuclear fuel rather than the heat resulting from its reaction. »

Uranium from Kazakhstan, Niger, Uzbekistan or Australia

Currently, to operate its 56 nuclear reactors, spread over 18 power plants, EDF needs 8,000 to 10,000 tonnes of natural uranium on average each year. Since there is no longer any French extraction of the ore, EDF’s uranium supply policy can be summed up as ?not all eggs in one basket?, by seeking to multiply sources of supply.

Over the sixteen-year period between 2005 and 2020, nearly three-quarters of the 138,230 tons of natural uranium imported into France came from four countries:

  1. Kazakhstan: 27,748 tonnes (i.e. 20.1%);
  2. Australia: 25,804 (18.7%);
  3. Niger : 24 787 (17,9 %) ;
  4. Uzbekistan: 22,197 (16.1%).

These figures, obtained from the Euratom Technical Committee (CTE), nevertheless show more the activity of Orano (ex-Areva focused on the activities of the uranium cycle) in terms of natural uranium enrichment than the origin details of the fuel loaded in French power plants.

Indeed, even if EDF obtains fuel mainly from Orano, the company can also deal with the few other companies that enrich uranium; in Europe (Netherlands, United Kingdom, Germany) or elsewhere in the world such as Russia, Japan or the United States.

Once enriched, uranium intended for use in power plants changes nationality to that of the country where it was enriched. Contacted by The world, EDF gave no details on the precise origin of the fuel loaded in its power plants, simply stating that “EDF’s uranium supplies are ensured over the long term by diversified contracts in terms of origins and suppliers, lasting up to twenty years”.

The nuclear sector defends the ?security of supplies?

On the side of the French nuclear industry, the general manager of Orano, Philippe Knoche, explains in an article Mining Annals than France ?control your supply? in uranium, because the resource ?is not concentrated in a single region of the world?, and so is not ?subject to geopolitical hazards?. Orano currently produces uranium in Kazakhstan (45%), Canada (30%) and Niger (25%).

Mr. Knoche points out that ?nearly 44% of uranium resources are located in OECD countries?, which would shield imports from geopolitical blackmail. It happens, however, that strategic contracts are called into question with these States, as shown by the recent example of the French submarines sold ? then canceled ? to Australia. Moreover, among France’s other major suppliers, Kazakhstan, Niger and Uzbekistan are not examples of political stability.

According to the director of Orano, the known resources of uranium could make it possible to continue to operate power stations until “mid-next century”, even for two hundred and fifty years, “if estimated resources are included” at the current level of use.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Why Emmanuel Macron is slow to clarify his nuclear promises

) [summary] => The Arlit mine in Niger, here in 2005, operated by the French group Orano. PIERRE VERDY / AFP To provide France with a nuclear fleet to reduce its dependence on oil imports, after the oil crisis of 1973, such was the objective of President Valéry Giscard-d’Estaing when he launched a program in 1974 which would ... Read more [atom_content] =>

To provide France with a nuclear fleet to reduce its dependence on oil imports, after the oil crisis of 1973, such was the objective of President Valéry Giscard-d’Estaing when he launched a program in 1974 which would lead to the construction of 45 nuclear power plants.

The nuclear power plants operated by EDF then produce electricity thanks to the heat emitted by the fission of uranium atoms; a material extracted, imported, enriched and then transformed into fuel by several companies that will be later merged under the name Areva. Energy independence is high, even if not total. French production of natural uranium is at its best, rising from 1,250 tonnes in 1970 to 2,634 tonnes in 1980.

Read also How nuclear is needed in the 2022 presidential campaign

Franco-French uranium mining stops

At the end of the 1990s, the nuclear program slowed down: France stopped building new power plants. In the aftermath, the Franco-French extraction of uranium declines, before stopping completely. Since the early 2000s, the uranium used for French nuclear power plants has been entirely imported, even if it is often then enriched in France, a detail that is important.

However, in its annual report, the Ministry of Ecological Transition states that France’s energy independence stands at 55.3% in 2020 and 53.4% ??in the summer of 2021 according to provisional data. This means that more than half of the energy consumed in France is produced on French soil. But then how do we arrive at this rate, when nuclear represents 70% of the electricity produced, and 100% of the fuel is imported?

An old statistical convention

The answer lies in a “statistical convention” from the statistics manual co-published by the International Energy Agency and by Eurostat, which recommends “counting” as primary energy the heat emitted by the reactor rather than the fuel used to operate it. This convention is old, and goes back “at the time when uranium was produced in France”, explains Bernard Laponche, nuclear physicist and president of the Global Chance association. ?We have since stopped producing it and the French mines have been closed. » The statistical convention remains.

Moreover, in the ?Energy balance sheet of France?, the word ?uranium? appears only twice in 189 pages, in explanatory notes and on the way of producing heat in a power station. In this balance sheet, “we have details on the price of coal, its origin or its calorific value, while we consume very little, laments Mr. Laponche, but we have nothing on uranium, which is nevertheless used to create the heat with which we produce electricity?. As this heat is produced on the hexagonal ground, the uranium is thus naturalized French.

Without this statistical convention, France could only achieve a 10 to 12% rate of energy independence, as the Ministry for Ecological Transition concedes in its energy report:

?In the case of France, which relies entirely on imported fuels (used directly or after recycling), the rate of energy independence would drop around 40 percentage points, to stand at around 12% in 2019, if the he primary energy was considered to be nuclear fuel rather than the heat resulting from its reaction. »

Uranium from Kazakhstan, Niger, Uzbekistan or Australia

Currently, to operate its 56 nuclear reactors, spread over 18 power plants, EDF needs 8,000 to 10,000 tonnes of natural uranium on average each year. Since there is no longer any French extraction of the ore, EDF’s uranium supply policy can be summed up as ?not all eggs in one basket?, by seeking to multiply sources of supply.

Over the sixteen-year period between 2005 and 2020, nearly three-quarters of the 138,230 tons of natural uranium imported into France came from four countries:

  1. Kazakhstan: 27,748 tonnes (i.e. 20.1%);
  2. Australia: 25,804 (18.7%);
  3. Niger : 24 787 (17,9 %) ;
  4. Uzbekistan: 22,197 (16.1%).

These figures, obtained from the Euratom Technical Committee (CTE), nevertheless show more the activity of Orano (ex-Areva focused on the activities of the uranium cycle) in terms of natural uranium enrichment than the origin details of the fuel loaded in French power plants.

Indeed, even if EDF obtains fuel mainly from Orano, the company can also deal with the few other companies that enrich uranium; in Europe (Netherlands, United Kingdom, Germany) or elsewhere in the world such as Russia, Japan or the United States.

Once enriched, uranium intended for use in power plants changes nationality to that of the country where it was enriched. Contacted by The world, EDF gave no details on the precise origin of the fuel loaded in its power plants, simply stating that “EDF’s uranium supplies are ensured over the long term by diversified contracts in terms of origins and suppliers, lasting up to twenty years”.

The nuclear sector defends the ?security of supplies?

On the side of the French nuclear industry, the general manager of Orano, Philippe Knoche, explains in an article Mining Annals than France ?control your supply? in uranium, because the resource ?is not concentrated in a single region of the world?, and so is not ?subject to geopolitical hazards?. Orano currently produces uranium in Kazakhstan (45%), Canada (30%) and Niger (25%).

Mr. Knoche points out that ?nearly 44% of uranium resources are located in OECD countries?, which would shield imports from geopolitical blackmail. It happens, however, that strategic contracts are called into question with these States, as shown by the recent example of the French submarines sold ? then canceled ? to Australia. Moreover, among France’s other major suppliers, Kazakhstan, Niger and Uzbekistan are not examples of political stability.

According to the director of Orano, the known resources of uranium could make it possible to continue to operate power stations until “mid-next century”, even for two hundred and fifty years, “if estimated resources are included” at the current level of use.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Why Emmanuel Macron is slow to clarify his nuclear promises

[date_timestamp] => 1643042613 ) [3] => Array ( [title] => the struggle of agricultural workers in Nicaragua taken to French justice [link] => https://movs.world/planet/the-struggle-of-agricultural-workers-in-nicaragua-taken-to-french-justice/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Mon, 24 Jan 2022 06:43:43 +0000 [category] => PlanetagriculturalFrenchjusticeNicaraguastruggleworkers [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/the-struggle-of-agricultural-workers-in-nicaragua-taken-to-french-justice/ [description] => Demonstration by agricultural workers against companies that have been exposed to harmful pesticides in banana plantations, in Managua, Nicaragua, in 2007. MIGUEL ALVAREZ / AFP It is an international, sprawling and unique case that finds itself before the French courts. A billion-dollar public health case. This is the amount of compensation claimed by 1,234 former ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

It is an international, sprawling and unique case that finds itself before the French courts. A billion-dollar public health case. This is the amount of compensation claimed by 1,234 former Nicaraguan farm workers from three American agrochemical multinationals. Until 1983, The Dow Chemical Company, Occidental Chemical (now Oxy) and Shell Oil exported DBCP (Dibromo-chloropropane) to Central America, which was banned in the United States in 1977. This extremely polluting pesticide, which causes cancer and infertility in particular, was used without protection by the plaintiffs to eliminate worms harmful to the roots of banana trees. Monday, January 24, the magistrates of the Paris court will examine the request for summons from the three American groups within the framework of the procedure ofexequatur launched by the victims’ lawyers.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Pesticides: Nicaraguans turn to France to enforce a judgment

This aims to make enforceable in France, and in the other States of the European Union, a Nicaraguan court decision which condemned the American companies to pay 805 million dollars in compensation to these former workers. This judgment, pronounced in 2006, recognizes the responsibility of American groups in the import, distribution and use of DBCP on farms between 1977 and 1983. This was upheld on appeal and, in 2012, by the Supreme Court of Nicaragua. However, this judicial decision could never be executed. Dow Chemical Company, Occidental Chemical and Shell Oil are strongly contesting it and have withdrawn from the country without leaving any seizable assets behind.

Suspicions on the file

Attracted by this case as by a treasure, American lawyers ? for some villainous ? rushed to Chinandega in Nicaragua to identify more and more alleged victims of the DBCP. And this, in order to bring the case before the American justice. It has been shown that certain health data have been doctored by these lawyers, that alleged victims of infertility have had children. At the same time, the American giants in question have never ceased to use their financial and legal power and their influence through lobbying and investigation firms to discredit the justice of Nicaragua, the plaintiffs and their advice.

In 2010, Californian judge Victoria Chaney overturned a ruling in favor of six Nicaraguan farmworkers. This magistrate reputed to be close to the Republican Party then points to a “conspiracy” and concludes to a fraud made possible by “Nicaragua’s peculiar and bizarre social ecosystem”. This judgment dashed the hopes of justice and compensation for Nicaraguan victims. At least in the United States where the three multinationals have their headquarters: in New York for Oxy, in the State of Delaware – considered a small “Tax haven” ? pour Shell Oil et Dow Chemical Company.

You have 45.11% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

) [summary] => Demonstration by agricultural workers against companies that have been exposed to harmful pesticides in banana plantations, in Managua, Nicaragua, in 2007. MIGUEL ALVAREZ / AFP It is an international, sprawling and unique case that finds itself before the French courts. A billion-dollar public health case. This is the amount of compensation claimed by 1,234 former ... Read more [atom_content] =>

It is an international, sprawling and unique case that finds itself before the French courts. A billion-dollar public health case. This is the amount of compensation claimed by 1,234 former Nicaraguan farm workers from three American agrochemical multinationals. Until 1983, The Dow Chemical Company, Occidental Chemical (now Oxy) and Shell Oil exported DBCP (Dibromo-chloropropane) to Central America, which was banned in the United States in 1977. This extremely polluting pesticide, which causes cancer and infertility in particular, was used without protection by the plaintiffs to eliminate worms harmful to the roots of banana trees. Monday, January 24, the magistrates of the Paris court will examine the request for summons from the three American groups within the framework of the procedure ofexequatur launched by the victims’ lawyers.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Pesticides: Nicaraguans turn to France to enforce a judgment

This aims to make enforceable in France, and in the other States of the European Union, a Nicaraguan court decision which condemned the American companies to pay 805 million dollars in compensation to these former workers. This judgment, pronounced in 2006, recognizes the responsibility of American groups in the import, distribution and use of DBCP on farms between 1977 and 1983. This was upheld on appeal and, in 2012, by the Supreme Court of Nicaragua. However, this judicial decision could never be executed. Dow Chemical Company, Occidental Chemical and Shell Oil are strongly contesting it and have withdrawn from the country without leaving any seizable assets behind.

Suspicions on the file

Attracted by this case as by a treasure, American lawyers ? for some villainous ? rushed to Chinandega in Nicaragua to identify more and more alleged victims of the DBCP. And this, in order to bring the case before the American justice. It has been shown that certain health data have been doctored by these lawyers, that alleged victims of infertility have had children. At the same time, the American giants in question have never ceased to use their financial and legal power and their influence through lobbying and investigation firms to discredit the justice of Nicaragua, the plaintiffs and their advice.

In 2010, Californian judge Victoria Chaney overturned a ruling in favor of six Nicaraguan farmworkers. This magistrate reputed to be close to the Republican Party then points to a “conspiracy” and concludes to a fraud made possible by “Nicaragua’s peculiar and bizarre social ecosystem”. This judgment dashed the hopes of justice and compensation for Nicaraguan victims. At least in the United States where the three multinationals have their headquarters: in New York for Oxy, in the State of Delaware – considered a small “Tax haven” ? pour Shell Oil et Dow Chemical Company.

You have 45.11% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

[date_timestamp] => 1643006623 ) [4] => Array ( [title] => clashes between demonstrators and police in Brussels [link] => https://movs.world/planet/clashes-between-demonstrators-and-police-in-brussels/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Sun, 23 Jan 2022 20:41:52 +0000 [category] => PlanetBrusselsclashesdemonstratorspolice [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/clashes-between-demonstrators-and-police-in-brussels/ [description] => During the demonstration against health restrictions, in Brussels, on January 23, 2022. GEERT VANDEN WIJNGAERT / AP Clashes opposed the police and people hostile to the restrictions linked to the Covid-19 pandemic, during a demonstration which brought together tens of thousands of people, in Brussels, on Sunday January 23. According to the authorities, around 50,000 ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

Clashes opposed the police and people hostile to the restrictions linked to the Covid-19 pandemic, during a demonstration which brought together tens of thousands of people, in Brussels, on Sunday January 23.

According to the authorities, around 50,000 people marched in the Belgian capital, some from other European countries. This is the largest in a series of protests in the city over the past few months.

Clashes erupted near European Union headquarters as police used water cannons and tear gas to push back protesters who were throwing cobblestones and firecrackers. According to RTL radio, masked protesters smashed a window at the entrance to the EU foreign affairs headquarters.

The participants in this parade, more crowded than previous processions, carried placards criticizing the Belgian Prime Minister, Alexander De Croo, as well as the sanitary pass.

Demonstrations against the health certificate ? required to access restaurants and cultural events in particular ? have been taking place regularly for several weeks in the Belgian capital. Some of the previous rallies had already been marked by clashes with the police.

Protesters from several countries

A demonstration against health restrictions, in Brussels, on January 23, 2022.

Organizers, including the World Wide Demonstration for Freedom and Europeans United for Freedom movements, had invited protesters from other European countries to participate on Sunday. Dutch, Polish, French and Romanian flags were visible in the procession.

The protest comes as some governments move towards reducing health restrictions, despite the persistence of the Omicron variant. The latter is now dominant in the European Union, announced the European Health Agency on Friday.

Belgium has seen a jump in daily cases above 60,000 in the past week, with authorities citing a « tsunami ». But the less deleterious effects of the Omicron variant and a high rate of vaccination have allowed the health system to be less under pressure than during previous waves. In this context, the Prime Minister announced on Friday that restaurants and bars could extend their opening hours. Nightclubs will remain closed.

In France, the government announced Thursday evening the lifting, in February, of most of the restrictions taken to curb the epidemic: end of wearing a mask outdoors and compulsory teleworking, reopening of nightclubs and return of standing concerts.

Read also: The timetable for lifting restrictions revealed

The World with AFP

) [summary] => During the demonstration against health restrictions, in Brussels, on January 23, 2022. GEERT VANDEN WIJNGAERT / AP Clashes opposed the police and people hostile to the restrictions linked to the Covid-19 pandemic, during a demonstration which brought together tens of thousands of people, in Brussels, on Sunday January 23. According to the authorities, around 50,000 ... Read more [atom_content] =>

Clashes opposed the police and people hostile to the restrictions linked to the Covid-19 pandemic, during a demonstration which brought together tens of thousands of people, in Brussels, on Sunday January 23.

According to the authorities, around 50,000 people marched in the Belgian capital, some from other European countries. This is the largest in a series of protests in the city over the past few months.

Clashes erupted near European Union headquarters as police used water cannons and tear gas to push back protesters who were throwing cobblestones and firecrackers. According to RTL radio, masked protesters smashed a window at the entrance to the EU foreign affairs headquarters.

The participants in this parade, more crowded than previous processions, carried placards criticizing the Belgian Prime Minister, Alexander De Croo, as well as the sanitary pass.

Demonstrations against the health certificate ? required to access restaurants and cultural events in particular ? have been taking place regularly for several weeks in the Belgian capital. Some of the previous rallies had already been marked by clashes with the police.

Protesters from several countries

A demonstration against health restrictions, in Brussels, on January 23, 2022.

Organizers, including the World Wide Demonstration for Freedom and Europeans United for Freedom movements, had invited protesters from other European countries to participate on Sunday. Dutch, Polish, French and Romanian flags were visible in the procession.

The protest comes as some governments move towards reducing health restrictions, despite the persistence of the Omicron variant. The latter is now dominant in the European Union, announced the European Health Agency on Friday.

Belgium has seen a jump in daily cases above 60,000 in the past week, with authorities citing a « tsunami ». But the less deleterious effects of the Omicron variant and a high rate of vaccination have allowed the health system to be less under pressure than during previous waves. In this context, the Prime Minister announced on Friday that restaurants and bars could extend their opening hours. Nightclubs will remain closed.

In France, the government announced Thursday evening the lifting, in February, of most of the restrictions taken to curb the epidemic: end of wearing a mask outdoors and compulsory teleworking, reopening of nightclubs and return of standing concerts.

Read also: The timetable for lifting restrictions revealed

The World with AFP

[date_timestamp] => 1642970512 ) [5] => Array ( [title] => Peru declares ?environmental emergency? after oil spill [link] => https://movs.world/planet/peru-declares-environmental-emergency-after-oil-spill/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Sun, 23 Jan 2022 00:39:22 +0000 [category] => PlanetdeclaresemergencyenvironmentalOilPeruspill [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/peru-declares-environmental-emergency-after-oil-spill/ [description] => Volunteers clean Cavero beach after an oil spill in Peru, January 22, 2022. MARTIN MEJIA / AP The Peruvian government announced on Saturday a “environmental emergency” 90 days for the coastal area damaged by the spill of 6,000 barrels of crude oil a week ago. Thanks to this measure, the authorities plan a ?sustainable management ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

The Peruvian government announced on Saturday a “environmental emergency” 90 days for the coastal area damaged by the spill of 6,000 barrels of crude oil a week ago. Thanks to this measure, the authorities plan a ?sustainable management of affected areas?, with some “recovery and remediation work” to mitigate the consequences of this disaster. The Peruvian coasts north of Lima were stained with oil that spilled at sea when crude oil was unloaded from a tanker at the La Pampilla refinery, owned by the Spanish company Repsol, in the region of Lima.

Read also In Peru, an oil spill threatens flora and fauna

According to the refinery, the accident which took place on January 15, was caused by a violent swell, following the volcanic eruption in Tonga. The tanker, the “Mare Doricum” flying the Italian flag, was loaded with 965,000 barrels of crude oil. For the Peruvian Ministry of the Environment, the declaration of emergency is justified by the fact that the oil spill ?constitutes a sudden event having a significant impact on the coastal marine ecosystem of great biological diversity? and represents a “high risk to public health”.

Arm wrestling between the government and Repsol

This statement indicates that Repsol is responsible for implementing the immediate and short-term action plan. For its part, Repsol considers that it should not bear the responsibility for this disaster, pointing out that the Peruvian maritime authorities had not issued a warning about the possible consequences of the eruption in Tonga. The company has nevertheless deployed teams and specialized equipment to combat pollution at sea and on land.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Ecological disaster in Peru after an oil leak caused by the volcanic eruption in Tonga

According to the Peruvian authorities, the oil spill is moving with the sea current towards the north, which is threatening the flora and fauna in two protected natural areas, the National Reserve of the System of Islands and Islets. ?on approximately 512 hectares? and the Ancon Protected Area ?on 1,758 hectares?. It has already polluted 21 beaches and caused the death of marine species while its potential economic effects are worrying, in particular depriving fishermen of any livelihood and causing the desertion of tourists. Peru demanded damages from Repsol on Wednesday. He gave her 10 days to comply with all cleaning and decontamination actions.

The World with AFP

) [summary] => Volunteers clean Cavero beach after an oil spill in Peru, January 22, 2022. MARTIN MEJIA / AP The Peruvian government announced on Saturday a “environmental emergency” 90 days for the coastal area damaged by the spill of 6,000 barrels of crude oil a week ago. Thanks to this measure, the authorities plan a ?sustainable management ... Read more [atom_content] =>

The Peruvian government announced on Saturday a “environmental emergency” 90 days for the coastal area damaged by the spill of 6,000 barrels of crude oil a week ago. Thanks to this measure, the authorities plan a ?sustainable management of affected areas?, with some “recovery and remediation work” to mitigate the consequences of this disaster. The Peruvian coasts north of Lima were stained with oil that spilled at sea when crude oil was unloaded from a tanker at the La Pampilla refinery, owned by the Spanish company Repsol, in the region of Lima.

Read also In Peru, an oil spill threatens flora and fauna

According to the refinery, the accident which took place on January 15, was caused by a violent swell, following the volcanic eruption in Tonga. The tanker, the “Mare Doricum” flying the Italian flag, was loaded with 965,000 barrels of crude oil. For the Peruvian Ministry of the Environment, the declaration of emergency is justified by the fact that the oil spill ?constitutes a sudden event having a significant impact on the coastal marine ecosystem of great biological diversity? and represents a “high risk to public health”.

Arm wrestling between the government and Repsol

This statement indicates that Repsol is responsible for implementing the immediate and short-term action plan. For its part, Repsol considers that it should not bear the responsibility for this disaster, pointing out that the Peruvian maritime authorities had not issued a warning about the possible consequences of the eruption in Tonga. The company has nevertheless deployed teams and specialized equipment to combat pollution at sea and on land.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Ecological disaster in Peru after an oil leak caused by the volcanic eruption in Tonga

According to the Peruvian authorities, the oil spill is moving with the sea current towards the north, which is threatening the flora and fauna in two protected natural areas, the National Reserve of the System of Islands and Islets. ?on approximately 512 hectares? and the Ancon Protected Area ?on 1,758 hectares?. It has already polluted 21 beaches and caused the death of marine species while its potential economic effects are worrying, in particular depriving fishermen of any livelihood and causing the desertion of tourists. Peru demanded damages from Repsol on Wednesday. He gave her 10 days to comply with all cleaning and decontamination actions.

The World with AFP

[date_timestamp] => 1642898362 ) [6] => Array ( [title] => BA.2, the sub-variant that raises new questions [link] => https://movs.world/planet/ba-2-the-sub-variant-that-raises-new-questions/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Sat, 22 Jan 2022 04:37:24 +0000 [category] => PlanetBA2questionsraisessubvariant [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/ba-2-the-sub-variant-that-raises-new-questions/ [description] => Cautious, the scientists do not seem alarmist about this BA.2 sub-variant. JEROME DELAY / AP Appeared a few weeks ago, a sub-variant of Omicron is now closely followed by epidemiologists. If BA.2 ? the name of this sub-variant ? seems close to the initial version, scientists want to know more about its characteristics and its ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

Appeared a few weeks ago, a sub-variant of Omicron is now closely followed by epidemiologists. If BA.2 ? the name of this sub-variant ? seems close to the initial version, scientists want to know more about its characteristics and its possible consequences on the Covid-19 pandemic.

The name Omicron is actually a ” generic term “ which designates without distinction several very close virus lineages, explains the World Health Organization (WHO), Friday January 21, in its weekly update. Among these brother lineages supervised under the name of Omicron, it is the one designated by the name BA.1 which is almost hegemonic. But certain data attract attention: BA.2, another of these lineages, would have become the majority in India or Denmark, where the number of daily cases has started to rise again.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Covid-19: the hope of a near epidemic peak is dissipating

?What surprised us was how quickly this sub-variant, which circulated a lot in Asia, settled in Denmark?, epidemiologist Antoine Flahault told Agence France-Presse (AFP). ?The country was expecting a peak in contamination in mid-January; it did not occur and may be due to this subvariant, which appears highly transmissible but no more virulent? than the original variant, he continues.

Scientists cautious but not alarmist

For the moment, the health authorities are waiting to learn more.

?What interests us is whether (this sub-variant) has different characteristics (from BA.1) in terms of contagiousness, immune escape or severity?, said the French public health agency on Friday.

To date, the BA.2 sub-variant has been detected in France, ?but at very low levels?. In Denmark, on the other hand, it is gradually replacing the BA.1, the Omicron variant “classic”, noted the French public health agency. ?The Danish authorities have no explanation for this phenomenon but it is being closely monitored?, she added. France on its side ?closely follows the data that will be produced by Denmark?.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Covid-19: the spread of Omicron in France disrupts the screening strategy

Cautious, the scientists do not seem alarmist. For Antoine Flahault, it is still too early to worry, but the « vigilance » is appropriate. “We have the impression for the moment that it is of a severity comparable to Omicron but many questions are still on the table”, he adds, inviting “put in place screening techniques to properly detect” BA.2 et ?see quickly what its properties are?.

“Very early observations in India and Denmark suggest that there is no major difference in severity compared to BA.1”, tweeted Tom Peacock, a virologist at Imperial College London. According to him, the mutations observed should not call into question the effectiveness of vaccines either. ?Even with slightly higher transmissibility? than the classic version of Omicron, he does not expect a change equivalent to that which occurred when the latter variant supplanted Delta. “I don’t think BA.2 is going to have a substantial impact on the current wave of the pandemic”, he observed.

The Minister of Health Olivier Véran also estimated Thursday that BA.2 does not “don’t change the situation” at this stage, while avoiding a final judgement. ?There are variations fairly regularly?, he recalled during a press conference with Prime Minister Jean Castex. “For what we know so far, it more or less matches the characteristics we know of Omicron”added the minister.

Read also Vaccination pass: the Constitutional Council validates the essentials of the bill

The World with AFP

) [summary] => Cautious, the scientists do not seem alarmist about this BA.2 sub-variant. JEROME DELAY / AP Appeared a few weeks ago, a sub-variant of Omicron is now closely followed by epidemiologists. If BA.2 ? the name of this sub-variant ? seems close to the initial version, scientists want to know more about its characteristics and its ... Read more [atom_content] =>

Appeared a few weeks ago, a sub-variant of Omicron is now closely followed by epidemiologists. If BA.2 ? the name of this sub-variant ? seems close to the initial version, scientists want to know more about its characteristics and its possible consequences on the Covid-19 pandemic.

The name Omicron is actually a ” generic term “ which designates without distinction several very close virus lineages, explains the World Health Organization (WHO), Friday January 21, in its weekly update. Among these brother lineages supervised under the name of Omicron, it is the one designated by the name BA.1 which is almost hegemonic. But certain data attract attention: BA.2, another of these lineages, would have become the majority in India or Denmark, where the number of daily cases has started to rise again.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Covid-19: the hope of a near epidemic peak is dissipating

?What surprised us was how quickly this sub-variant, which circulated a lot in Asia, settled in Denmark?, epidemiologist Antoine Flahault told Agence France-Presse (AFP). ?The country was expecting a peak in contamination in mid-January; it did not occur and may be due to this subvariant, which appears highly transmissible but no more virulent? than the original variant, he continues.

Scientists cautious but not alarmist

For the moment, the health authorities are waiting to learn more.

?What interests us is whether (this sub-variant) has different characteristics (from BA.1) in terms of contagiousness, immune escape or severity?, said the French public health agency on Friday.

To date, the BA.2 sub-variant has been detected in France, ?but at very low levels?. In Denmark, on the other hand, it is gradually replacing the BA.1, the Omicron variant “classic”, noted the French public health agency. ?The Danish authorities have no explanation for this phenomenon but it is being closely monitored?, she added. France on its side ?closely follows the data that will be produced by Denmark?.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Covid-19: the spread of Omicron in France disrupts the screening strategy

Cautious, the scientists do not seem alarmist. For Antoine Flahault, it is still too early to worry, but the « vigilance » is appropriate. “We have the impression for the moment that it is of a severity comparable to Omicron but many questions are still on the table”, he adds, inviting “put in place screening techniques to properly detect” BA.2 et ?see quickly what its properties are?.

“Very early observations in India and Denmark suggest that there is no major difference in severity compared to BA.1”, tweeted Tom Peacock, a virologist at Imperial College London. According to him, the mutations observed should not call into question the effectiveness of vaccines either. ?Even with slightly higher transmissibility? than the classic version of Omicron, he does not expect a change equivalent to that which occurred when the latter variant supplanted Delta. “I don’t think BA.2 is going to have a substantial impact on the current wave of the pandemic”, he observed.

The Minister of Health Olivier Véran also estimated Thursday that BA.2 does not “don’t change the situation” at this stage, while avoiding a final judgement. ?There are variations fairly regularly?, he recalled during a press conference with Prime Minister Jean Castex. “For what we know so far, it more or less matches the characteristics we know of Omicron”added the minister.

Read also Vaccination pass: the Constitutional Council validates the essentials of the bill

The World with AFP

[date_timestamp] => 1642826244 ) [7] => Array ( [title] => Europe still divided on its ranking of sustainable activities [link] => https://movs.world/planet/europe-still-divided-on-its-ranking-of-sustainable-activities/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Fri, 21 Jan 2022 18:36:40 +0000 [category] => PlanetactivitiesdividedEuropeRankingsustainable [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/europe-still-divided-on-its-ranking-of-sustainable-activities/ [description] => European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen in Brussels on January 11, 2022. OLIVER MATTHYS / AP New delay in the European taxonomy, this classification of sustainable activities which aims to direct private investments towards sectors contributing to reduce greenhouse gases. The delegated act that the Commission has been preparing for several months will not ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

New delay in the European taxonomy, this classification of sustainable activities which aims to direct private investments towards sectors contributing to reduce greenhouse gases. The delegated act that the Commission has been preparing for several months will not be presented during the last week of January, as planned.

Brussels first wants to make sure that it will not be rejected by the co-legislators. Because, once published, the text can no longer be amended, but the Member States and the European Parliament can oppose it, within four months, by a qualified majority of 20 Member States representing 65% of the population of European Union (EU) for the former, and by a simple majority for the latter.

Since the beginning of the year, the Commission has stepped up contacts with its experts, the Member States and the European Parliament, who had until Friday 21 January to give their feedback.

Berlin has yet to make its position clear

On the side of the Twenty-Seven, the draft delegated act, which provides for nuclear and gas to be included in the list of activities « durables », to the extent that they would contribute to the « transition » towards a green economy, divides. But a circumstantial alliance between the proponents of gas and those of the atom assures him, at this stage, of being adopted. The former, notably Poland and its Eastern European neighbours, need gas to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. The latter, led by France, know how to put forward their arguments, at a time when energy prices are soaring and when Europe is committed to respecting the Paris climate agreement of 2015 and achieve carbon neutrality by 2050.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The European Commission is preparing to classify nuclear as green energy

During a meeting in Amiens of European environment ministers on Friday 21 January, Luxembourg and Austria reaffirmed their opposition to the inclusion of nuclear power in the taxonomy and recalled their intention, if the text should not evolve, to seize the Court of Justice of the EU. The day before, Vienna and Luxembourg had published a letter with Copenhagen and Madrid, in which they ask the Commission to reconsider its plan to grant gas and nuclear power a green label, even on a transitional basis.

Berlin, for the time being, has not made its position clear, as the three coalition parties are so divided: the liberals of the FDP support the Commission’s text, the SPD is against the atom, but can live with gas, and the Greens are hostile to both energies. Nuclear is not ?not green energy? ni « durable », nevertheless affirmed, in Amiens on Thursday, Secretary of State Stefan Tidow, while adding that he does not “thought” not only that ?weighs on Franco-German relations?. So far, Chancellor Olaf Scholz has not made taxonomy a casus belli with Paris.

You have 31.11% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

) [summary] => European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen in Brussels on January 11, 2022. OLIVER MATTHYS / AP New delay in the European taxonomy, this classification of sustainable activities which aims to direct private investments towards sectors contributing to reduce greenhouse gases. The delegated act that the Commission has been preparing for several months will not ... Read more [atom_content] =>

New delay in the European taxonomy, this classification of sustainable activities which aims to direct private investments towards sectors contributing to reduce greenhouse gases. The delegated act that the Commission has been preparing for several months will not be presented during the last week of January, as planned.

Brussels first wants to make sure that it will not be rejected by the co-legislators. Because, once published, the text can no longer be amended, but the Member States and the European Parliament can oppose it, within four months, by a qualified majority of 20 Member States representing 65% of the population of European Union (EU) for the former, and by a simple majority for the latter.

Since the beginning of the year, the Commission has stepped up contacts with its experts, the Member States and the European Parliament, who had until Friday 21 January to give their feedback.

Berlin has yet to make its position clear

On the side of the Twenty-Seven, the draft delegated act, which provides for nuclear and gas to be included in the list of activities « durables », to the extent that they would contribute to the « transition » towards a green economy, divides. But a circumstantial alliance between the proponents of gas and those of the atom assures him, at this stage, of being adopted. The former, notably Poland and its Eastern European neighbours, need gas to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. The latter, led by France, know how to put forward their arguments, at a time when energy prices are soaring and when Europe is committed to respecting the Paris climate agreement of 2015 and achieve carbon neutrality by 2050.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The European Commission is preparing to classify nuclear as green energy

During a meeting in Amiens of European environment ministers on Friday 21 January, Luxembourg and Austria reaffirmed their opposition to the inclusion of nuclear power in the taxonomy and recalled their intention, if the text should not evolve, to seize the Court of Justice of the EU. The day before, Vienna and Luxembourg had published a letter with Copenhagen and Madrid, in which they ask the Commission to reconsider its plan to grant gas and nuclear power a green label, even on a transitional basis.

Berlin, for the time being, has not made its position clear, as the three coalition parties are so divided: the liberals of the FDP support the Commission’s text, the SPD is against the atom, but can live with gas, and the Greens are hostile to both energies. Nuclear is not ?not green energy? ni « durable », nevertheless affirmed, in Amiens on Thursday, Secretary of State Stefan Tidow, while adding that he does not “thought” not only that ?weighs on Franco-German relations?. So far, Chancellor Olaf Scholz has not made taxonomy a casus belli with Paris.

You have 31.11% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

[date_timestamp] => 1642790200 ) [8] => Array ( [title] => Singer Adele forced to postpone her series of concerts in Las Vegas at the last moment [link] => https://movs.world/planet/singer-adele-forced-to-postpone-her-series-of-concerts-in-las-vegas-at-the-last-moment/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Fri, 21 Jan 2022 08:35:57 +0000 [category] => PlanetAdeleConcertsforcedlasmomentpostponeSeriessingerVegas [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/singer-adele-forced-to-postpone-her-series-of-concerts-in-las-vegas-at-the-last-moment/ [description] => Adèle, February 12, 2017, at the Grammy Awards, in Los Angeles (California). VALERIE MACON / AFP ?I’m sorry but the show is not ready. » It is in tears that the British singer Adele announced, Thursday, January 20, the indefinite postponement of her series of concerts in residence in Las Vegas (Nevada), on the eve ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

?I’m sorry but the show is not ready. » It is in tears that the British singer Adele announced, Thursday, January 20, the indefinite postponement of her series of concerts in residence in Las Vegas (Nevada), on the eve of the first appointment.

?Half of my team is [malade] of the Covid and it was impossible to finalize the show. I’m disgusted”, explains the singer in a video posted on his Twitter account and Instagram, apologizing to ?everyone who made the trip? to attend the concert planned in the Colosseum hall of the Caesars Palace hotel.

Read the interview with Adele: Article reserved for our subscribers “I still don’t consider myself a real singer”

In November 2021, shortly after the release of her fourth studio album, 30, the star announced that she would perform every weekend for twelve weeks from January 21 in Las Vegas.

Dates to reschedule

?We tried absolutely everything we could to get everything ready on time. (?) but we were rolled by the delivery times and the Covid?, laments the singer. ?We will reschedule all the dates, we are taking care of it?, promises the 33-year-old artist.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers With ?30?, Adele crosses the valley of tears

The title of the album, 30, is a reference to Adele’s age when she started it three years ago, when her life was all torment, between her divorce and the abrupt end to her career. The Londoner exiled in Los Angeles (California) spoke at length in the magazine Vogue to say how cathartic this very personal record was.

The World with AFP

) [summary] => Adèle, February 12, 2017, at the Grammy Awards, in Los Angeles (California). VALERIE MACON / AFP ?I’m sorry but the show is not ready. » It is in tears that the British singer Adele announced, Thursday, January 20, the indefinite postponement of her series of concerts in residence in Las Vegas (Nevada), on the eve ... Read more [atom_content] =>

?I’m sorry but the show is not ready. » It is in tears that the British singer Adele announced, Thursday, January 20, the indefinite postponement of her series of concerts in residence in Las Vegas (Nevada), on the eve of the first appointment.

?Half of my team is [malade] of the Covid and it was impossible to finalize the show. I’m disgusted”, explains the singer in a video posted on his Twitter account and Instagram, apologizing to ?everyone who made the trip? to attend the concert planned in the Colosseum hall of the Caesars Palace hotel.

Read the interview with Adele: Article reserved for our subscribers “I still don’t consider myself a real singer”

In November 2021, shortly after the release of her fourth studio album, 30, the star announced that she would perform every weekend for twelve weeks from January 21 in Las Vegas.

Dates to reschedule

?We tried absolutely everything we could to get everything ready on time. (?) but we were rolled by the delivery times and the Covid?, laments the singer. ?We will reschedule all the dates, we are taking care of it?, promises the 33-year-old artist.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers With ?30?, Adele crosses the valley of tears

The title of the album, 30, is a reference to Adele’s age when she started it three years ago, when her life was all torment, between her divorce and the abrupt end to her career. The Londoner exiled in Los Angeles (California) spoke at length in the magazine Vogue to say how cathartic this very personal record was.

The World with AFP

[date_timestamp] => 1642754157 ) [9] => Array ( [title] => relief for cultural professionals after Jean Castex?s announcements [link] => https://movs.world/planet/relief-for-cultural-professionals-after-jean-castexs-announcements/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Thu, 20 Jan 2022 22:34:26 +0000 [category] => PlanetannouncementsCastexsculturalJeanprofessionalsrelief [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/relief-for-cultural-professionals-after-jean-castexs-announcements/ [description] => During a concert at the AccorHotels Arena, in Paris, on May 29, 2021. STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN / AFP The professionals were waiting for it impatiently. Thursday January 20, the Prime Minister, Jean Castex, announced a relief ?graduated and progressive? health restrictions that have hit the cultural sector since the beginning of the year. Concretely, shows ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

The professionals were waiting for it impatiently. Thursday January 20, the Prime Minister, Jean Castex, announced a relief ?graduated and progressive? health restrictions that have hit the cultural sector since the beginning of the year. Concretely, shows taking place with a seated audience can take place without a gauge from February 2. Since January 3, the maximum capacity of the halls had been set at 2,000 spectators indoors and 5,000 outdoors, which had led to the cancellation of many events.

For standing concerts, which were purely and simply banned since January 3, both indoors and outdoors, professionals will have to wait until February 16 before they can resume their activity. An additional period deemed necessary by the Prime Minister to “absorb the effects of the epidemic peak” and ensure a real ebb of the fifth wave of contamination, when more than 425,000 positive cases for Covid-19 were still recorded on Thursday.

Read also: Article reserved for our subscribers Concert halls and sporting events subject to new restrictions

This resumption of normal activity is on one condition: spectators aged 16 and over must, from January 24, present a vaccination pass, that is to say a complete vaccination schedule, to be able to enter a auditorium, cinema or museum. Only those aged 12 to 15 will still be able to present a health pass and be admitted to a cultural place with a simple negative test. Children under 12 are not affected by these restrictions. Wearing a mask, on the other hand, remains compulsory for everyone.

?We finally get out of the artistic blur?

Unsurprisingly, these announcements were rather well received by professionals. ?We are finally getting out of the artistic blur. Since the end of December [2021], we asked for a calendar to be able to work with the producers and schedule concerts. From tomorrow, the public will be able to start buying tickets again with confidence., rejoices Daniel Colling, the president of the Zenith of Paris, Nantes and Toulouse, who had suspended all the shows and concerts planned in its halls in January.

“It’s good, we needed visibility, we asked for it and we got it, abounds Angelo Gopee, general manager of the French subsidiary of Live Nation, the largest concert organizer in the world. But you have to be realistic, the public will have a hard time getting over it. When we reopened last year, many rooms continued to suffer from people’s weariness. We will have to reschedule dates again next week. Our activity should not resume normally until the end of March. »

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) [summary] => During a concert at the AccorHotels Arena, in Paris, on May 29, 2021. STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN / AFP The professionals were waiting for it impatiently. Thursday January 20, the Prime Minister, Jean Castex, announced a relief ?graduated and progressive? health restrictions that have hit the cultural sector since the beginning of the year. Concretely, shows ... Read more [atom_content] =>

The professionals were waiting for it impatiently. Thursday January 20, the Prime Minister, Jean Castex, announced a relief ?graduated and progressive? health restrictions that have hit the cultural sector since the beginning of the year. Concretely, shows taking place with a seated audience can take place without a gauge from February 2. Since January 3, the maximum capacity of the halls had been set at 2,000 spectators indoors and 5,000 outdoors, which had led to the cancellation of many events.

For standing concerts, which were purely and simply banned since January 3, both indoors and outdoors, professionals will have to wait until February 16 before they can resume their activity. An additional period deemed necessary by the Prime Minister to “absorb the effects of the epidemic peak” and ensure a real ebb of the fifth wave of contamination, when more than 425,000 positive cases for Covid-19 were still recorded on Thursday.

Read also: Article reserved for our subscribers Concert halls and sporting events subject to new restrictions

This resumption of normal activity is on one condition: spectators aged 16 and over must, from January 24, present a vaccination pass, that is to say a complete vaccination schedule, to be able to enter a auditorium, cinema or museum. Only those aged 12 to 15 will still be able to present a health pass and be admitted to a cultural place with a simple negative test. Children under 12 are not affected by these restrictions. Wearing a mask, on the other hand, remains compulsory for everyone.

?We finally get out of the artistic blur?

Unsurprisingly, these announcements were rather well received by professionals. ?We are finally getting out of the artistic blur. Since the end of December [2021], we asked for a calendar to be able to work with the producers and schedule concerts. From tomorrow, the public will be able to start buying tickets again with confidence., rejoices Daniel Colling, the president of the Zenith of Paris, Nantes and Toulouse, who had suspended all the shows and concerts planned in its halls in January.

“It’s good, we needed visibility, we asked for it and we got it, abounds Angelo Gopee, general manager of the French subsidiary of Live Nation, the largest concert organizer in the world. But you have to be realistic, the public will have a hard time getting over it. When we reopened last year, many rooms continued to suffer from people’s weariness. We will have to reschedule dates again next week. Our activity should not resume normally until the end of March. »

You have 40.57% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

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